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Archive for the ‘Infrared’ Category

[Hari Wiguna’s] father is ninety years young. He started having trouble pushing the buttons on his TV remote, so [Hari] decided to build a custom remote that just has the buttons his dad needs. Oh, and the buttons are big.

There are few interesting things about this project. [Hari] wanted to maximize battery life, so he went through a good bit of effort to keep the processor asleep and minimize power consumption. The remote is programmable, but [Hari] didn’t have access to his dad’s remotes. His answer was elegant. He used his Android phone to mimic the required remotes and provided a way for the remote to learn from another remote (in this case, the phone).

[Hari] made a series of videos that cover the project from the breadboard to a good-looking plastic case with laser cut overlays. It is a well-thought out and documented Arduino project and a good model for what you can do to make life more accessible to anyone with special needs.

[Hari’s] code is available on Github. We are sure his dad will be happy with the result. It is sometimes easier to think of what we want (like a cool and complex touch screen remote) instead of what the end user will appreciate, but [Hari] nailed it, we think. Of course, back in the day, your remote only had seven buttons, anyway.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, home entertainment hacks

The world’s first Android autonomous vehicleLearn how a team of students created the first Google Android-based autonomous R/C car, able to detect lanes, avoid obstacles, self-park, and more.

Read more on MAKE

The post Build Your Own Android-Powered Self Driving R/C Car appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Chances are pretty good you’ve had a glowing probe clipped to your fingertip or earlobe in some clinic or doctor’s office. If you have, then you’re familiar with pulse oximetry, a cheap and non-invasive test that’s intended to measure how much oxygen your blood is carrying, with the bonus of an accurate count of your pulse rate. You can run down to the local drug store or big box and get a fingertip pulse oximeter for about $25USD, but if you want to learn more about photoplethysmography (PPG), [Rajendra Bhatt]’s open-source pulse oximeter might be a better choice.

PPG is based on the fact that oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin have different optical characteristics. A simple probe with an LED floods your fingertip with IR light, and a photodiode reads the amount of light reflected by the hemoglobin. [Rajendra]’s Easy Pulse Plugin receives and amplifies the signal from the probe and sends it to a header, suitable for Arduino consumption. What you do with the signal from there is up to you – light an LED in time with your heartbeat, plot oxygen saturation as a function of time, or drive a display to show the current pulse and saturation.

We’ve seen some pretty slick DIY pulse oximeters before, and some with a decidedly home-brew feel, but this seems like a good balance between sophisticated design and open source hackability. And don’t forget that IR LEDs can be used for other non-invasive diagnostics too.

The 2015 Hackaday Prize is sponsored by:


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Medical hacks, The Hackaday Prize

torch1Tiki torches are a fun summer lighting solution and this RGB LED version, that uses an Arduino, can be a great alternative to an open flame.

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The post Mason Jar LED Tiki Torches Glow Any Color appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Gen
27

A Remote for CHDK Cameras Made Possible with Arduino

arduino, arduino hacks, atmega 328p, bluetooth, camera, chdk, control, Infrared, IR, photo, Photography, remote control, USB Commenti disabilitati su A Remote for CHDK Cameras Made Possible with Arduino 

[AlxDroidDev] built himself a nice remote control box for CHDK-enabled cameras. If you haven’t heard of CHDK, it’s a pretty cool software modification for some Canon cameras. CHDK adds many new features to inexpensive cameras. In this case, [AlxDroidDev] is using a feature that allows the camera shutter to be activated via USB. CHDK can be run from the SD card, so no permanent modifications need to be made to the camera.

[AlxDroidDev’s] device runs off of an ATMega328p with Arduino. It operates from a 9V battery. The circuit contains an infrared receiver and also a Bluetooth module. This allows [AlxDroidDev] to control his camera using either method. The device interfaces to the camera using a standard USB connector and cable. It contains three LEDs, red, green, and blue. Each one indicates the status of a different function.

The Arduino uses Ken Shirrif’s IR Remote library to handle the infrared remote control functions. SoftwareSerial is used to connect to the Bluetooth module. The Arduino code has built-in functionality for both Canon and Nikon infrared remote controls. To control the camera via Bluetooth, [AlxDroidDev] built a custom Android application. The app can not only control the camera’s shutter, but it can also control the level of zoom.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Gen
11

Simple and Inexpensive Heartbeat Detector

arduino, arduino hacks, heartbeat, Infrared, LED, Medical, photodiode, photoplethysmography, pulse Commenti disabilitati su Simple and Inexpensive Heartbeat Detector 

There are many ways to detect a heartbeat electronically. One of the simpler ways is to take [Orlando’s] approach. He’s built a finger-mounted pulse detector using a few simple components and an Arduino.

This circuit uses a method known as photoplethysmography. As blood is pumped through your body, the volume of blood in your extremities increases and decreases with each heartbeat. This method uses a light source and a detector to determine changes in the amount of blood in your extremities. In this case, [Orlando] is using the finger.

[Orlando] built a finger cuff containing an infrared LED and a photodiode. These components reside on opposite sides of the finger. The IR LED shines light through the finger while the photodiode detects it on the other side. The photodiode detects changes in the amount of light as blood pumps in and out of the finger.

The sensor is hooked up to an op amp circuit in order to convert the varying current into a varying voltage. The signal is then filtered and amplified. An Arduino detects the voltage changes and transmits the information to a computer via serial. [Orlando] has written both a LabVIEW program as well as a Processing program to plot the data as a waveform. If you’d rather ditch the PC altogether, you might want to check out this standalone heartbeat sensor instead.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Nov
11

Smart Remote Control Doubles as Super Simple IR Sniffer

arduino, Arduino Yún, Electronics, GreatCreate, Infrared, IR, RadioShack, Weekend Projects Commenti disabilitati su Smart Remote Control Doubles as Super Simple IR Sniffer 

A mini breadboard fits perfectly snug between the Yún's header sockets.Want to sniff a remote control or other IR device's control codes? The Smart Remote Control will make quick work of that, combining an Arduino Yún with a simple solderless breadboard circuit.

Read more on MAKE

smrt_sniffCombine the Arduino Yún with a simple solderless breadboard circuit to create a homemade 'universal' remote control that you can navigate with your laptop or smartphone.

Read more on MAKE

Ago
18

Play the DIY arpeggiator with infrared detectors and Arduino Mega

arduino, arduino mega, arpeggiator, Featured, Infrared, mega Commenti disabilitati su Play the DIY arpeggiator with infrared detectors and Arduino Mega 

infraharp

After spending some time on Arduino Forum and finding the right solutions for his project’s sketch, Connor Hubeny shared with us the infraHarp: an Arduino-powered eight-tone arpeggiator made with infrared emitters and detectors, Sparkfun’s Musical Instrument Shield, and an Arduino Mega 2560:

The InfraHarp was my first Arduino project. At first the project seemed daunting since I had no previous experience in programming and electrical engineering. Yet after spending some time with the Arduino I realized that electronics work very much the same, and by learning a few core components you are really right on the doorstep of exploring any technology you have the faintest interest in.

The InfraHarp can play in the keys of A, B, C, D, E, F, G in major, minor melodic and harmonic scales, with two octave choices. Listen to it in the video below:

 

The project requires basic soldering skills and Connor shared all the info and the sketch on this page.

bb4

Mag
31

Bare Bones Arduino IR Receiver

arduino, arduino hacks, Infrared, IR, IR emitter, remote, remote control, TV remote Commenti disabilitati su Bare Bones Arduino IR Receiver 

TV Remote

Old infrared remote controls can be a great way to interface with your projects. One of [AnalysIR's] latest blog posts goes over the simplest way to create an Arduino based IR receiver, making it easier than ever to put that old remote to good use.

Due to the popularity of their first IR receiver post, the silver bullet IR receiver, [AnalysIR] decided to write a quick post about using IR on the Arduino. The part list consists of one Arduino, two resistors, and one IR emitter. That’s right, an emitter. When an LED (IR or otherwise) is reverse biased it can act as a light sensor. The main difference when using this method is that the IR signal is not inverted as it would normally be when using a more common modulated IR receiver module. All of the Arduino code you need to get up and running is also provided. The main limitation when using this configuration, is that the remote control needs to be very close to the IR emitter in order for it to receive the signal.

What will you control with your old TV remote? It would be interesting to see this circuit hooked up so that a single IR emitter can act both as a transmitter and a receiver. Go ahead and give it a try, then let us know how it went!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks


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