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Archive for the ‘piano’ Category

Brandon Switzer had a grand image in mind when he set off to create this player piano. Like most of us, he had an arduino that had been sitting there doing nothing for quite some time. He needed a project to focus his attention and learn some things. He landed […]

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The post Brandon’s Player Piano Took Patience, and A Whole Lot of Solenoids appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Giu
03

Quick and dirty touch-sensitive keyboard project

arduino, arduino hacks, capsense, keyboard, piano, synthesizer, touch sensitive, touch sensor Commenti disabilitati su Quick and dirty touch-sensitive keyboard project 

quick-dirty-touch-sensitive-keyboard

You don’t have to have high-quality parts to play around with electronics and here’s a great example. [Vishal] used junk to play around with CapSense, the touch sensitive Arduino library. What he ended up with is this touch-based piano keyboard.

We’ve featured the CapSense library in the past, but even that example uses a very meticulously crafted test rig of foil tape, protoboard, and some resistors. If you still haven’t given it a try follow this example of using aluminum foil, electrical tape, and a cardboard box.

[Vishal] just sandwiched the end of jumper wire between two pieces of foil to make each ‘key’. We believe the other end of the wire is soldered to the bias resistors where they connect to a couple of pin headers. The headers were hot-glued in place through holes in the bottom of the box, making the entire rig simple to plug into the Arduino board driving it. After adding in a small speaker and flashing the code he’s finished. It certainly makes for a short afternoon project which you won’t feel bad about taking apart later since you didn’t sink a ton of time or resources into the build.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Feb
07

Fruit piano uses a different circuit than the Makey Makey

arduino, arduino hacks, banana, capacitive, fruit, Makey Makey, peripherals hacks, piano, touch sensor Commenti disabilitati su Fruit piano uses a different circuit than the Makey Makey 

screen

[Hasbi Sevinç] is using perishable goods in his electronics project. The orange, tomato, and two apples seen above act as keys for the virtual piano. The concept is the same as the Makey Makey which is often demonstrated as a banana piano. This implementation uses an Arduino to read the sensors and to connect to the computer running the piano program.

You can see there’s a fair amount of circuitry built on the breadboard. Each piece of fruit has its own channel to make it into a touch sensor. The signal produced when your finger contacts the food is amplified by transistors connected in a Darlington pair. That circuit drives the low side of a optoisolator transmitter. The receiving side of it is connected the I/O pin of the Arduino. You can see the schematic as well as a demo clip after the break.

This use of hardware frees up a lot of your microcontroller cycles. That’s because projects like this banana piano use the timers to measure RC decay. [Hasbi's] setup provides a digital signal that at most only needs to be debounced.

circuit


Filed under: arduino hacks, peripherals hacks
Feb
07

Fruit piano uses a different circuit than the Makey Makey

arduino, arduino hacks, banana, capacitive, fruit, Makey Makey, peripherals hacks, piano, touch sensor Commenti disabilitati su Fruit piano uses a different circuit than the Makey Makey 

screen

[Hasbi Sevinç] is using perishable goods in his electronics project. The orange, tomato, and two apples seen above act as keys for the virtual piano. The concept is the same as the Makey Makey which is often demonstrated as a banana piano. This implementation uses an Arduino to read the sensors and to connect to the computer running the piano program.

You can see there’s a fair amount of circuitry built on the breadboard. Each piece of fruit has its own channel to make it into a touch sensor. The signal produced when your finger contacts the food is amplified by transistors connected in a Darlington pair. That circuit drives the low side of a optoisolator transmitter. The receiving side of it is connected the I/O pin of the Arduino. You can see the schematic as well as a demo clip after the break.

This use of hardware frees up a lot of your microcontroller cycles. That’s because projects like this banana piano use the timers to measure RC decay. [Hasbi's] setup provides a digital signal that at most only needs to be debounced.

circuit


Filed under: arduino hacks, peripherals hacks


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