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An embedded MEMS sensor might be lots of fun to play with on your first foray into the embedded world–why not deploy a whole network of them? Alas, the problem with communicating with a series of identical sensors becomes increasingly complicated as we start needing to handle the details of signal integrity and the communication protocols to handle all that data. Fortunately, [Artem], [Hsin-Liu], and [Joseph] at MIT Media Labs have made sensor deployment as easy as unraveling a strip of tape from your toolkit. They’ve developed SensorTape, an unrollable, deployable network of interconnected IMU and proximity sensors packaged in a familiar form factor of a roll of masking tape.

Possibly the most interesting technical challenge in a string of connected sensor nodes is picking a protocol that will deliver appreciable data rates with low latency. For that task the folks at MIT Media labs picked a combination of I²C and peer-to-peer serial. I²C accomodates the majority of transmissions from master to tape-node slave, but addresses are assigned dynamically over serial via inter-microcontroller communication. The net effect is a fast transfer rate of 100 KHz via I²C with a protocol initialization sequence that accommodates chains of various lengths–up to 128 units long! The full details behind the protocol are in their paper [PDF].

With a system as reconfigurable as SensorTape, new possibilities unfold with a solid framework for deploying sensors and aggregating the data. Have a look at their video after the break to get a sense of some of the use-cases that they’ve uncovered. Beyond their discoveries, there are certainly plenty others. What happens when we spin them up in the dryer, lay them under our car or on the ceiling? These were questions we may never have dreamed up because the tools just didn’t exist! Our props are out to SensorTape for giving us a tool to explore a world of sensor arrays without having to trip over ourselves in the implementation details.

via [CreativeApplications]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, news

The Reality Editor (Credit: Fluid Interface Group/MIT)Augmented reality has yet to find a foothold in widespread applications, but MIT has just released an AR app that allows you to control IoT devices.

Read more on MAKE

The post MIT’s Reality Editor Controls IoT Devices via Augmented Reality appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

The Reality Editor (Credit: Fluid Interface Group/MIT)Augmented reality has yet to find a foothold in widespread applications, but MIT has just released an AR app that allows you to control IoT devices.

Read more on MAKE

The post MIT’s Reality Editor Controls IoT Devices via Augmented Reality appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Giu
05

Open Hardware Summit: call for papers is open!

Announcements, events, Hardware, mit, open hardware, open source, Summit Commenti disabilitati su Open Hardware Summit: call for papers is open! 

open hardware 2013

The Open Source Hardware Association invites submissions for the fourth annual Open Hardware Summit, to be held September 6, 2013 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The Open Hardware Summit is the world’s first comprehensive conference on open hardware; a venue to discuss and draw attention to the rapidly growing Open Source Hardware movement. The Open Hardware Summit is a venue to present, discuss, and learn about open hardware of all kinds. The summit examines open hardware and its relation to other issues, such as software, design, business, law, and education.

They are seeking proposals for talks, posters, and demos from individuals and groups working with open hardware and related areas.  Submissions are due by JUNE 21, 2013. Please see the complete call for papers for additional details.

Topics of interest for the summit include, but are not limited to:

Digital fabrication

Means of supporting collaboration and community interaction

Open source business and legal models

Manufacturing models

Open Source Hardware Licenses

Software/Hardware

Sustainability

Communities of Practice

Other topics related to the intersection openness and hardware

ohs2013

Apr
13

Beat Feet: set your beats and effects with gestures using Arduino

bangalore, mit, music, wearable, Wearable Computing, workshop Commenti disabilitati su Beat Feet: set your beats and effects with gestures using Arduino 

 

bare feet

One of the teams participating to the MIT Media Labs Design Innovation workshop at PESIT Bangalore last January built something called  Beat Feet using Arduino Uno:

We designed a system which will allow musicians, guitarists and keyboardists to set the beats according to the music they play, without getting up from their place or even without lifting their hands off the instrument! Yes, simply by tapping foot at a constant rate. Don’t believe it?

Beat Feet allows musicians to add drum and guitar effects  using only feet gestures and wearable sensors. Check the details of the project on this website and watch the video below to see it in action!

Feb
15

Beginner’s Android/Arduino example shows the power of App Inventor

Android, app inventor, arduino hacks, bluetooth, graphical, mit Commenti disabilitati su Beginner’s Android/Arduino example shows the power of App Inventor 

app-inventor-android-bluetooth-example

This is a simple project. It uses an Android device to switch an LED driven by the Arduino. Connectivity is provided by the Bluetooth module inserted in the breadboard. But one look at the UI on the Android device and you might think this is anything but simple. The truth is that [Kerimil] didn’t spend forever learning Java and programming the app. Instead he’s showing off the power of  App Inventor to get your Android controls up and running fast.

Check out the third button down; when was the last time you added voice commands to your project? It’s worth clicking through to see just how simple that portion was. App Inventor — a Google cast-out that is now maintained by MIT — is a graphical tool that unlocks the power of an Android handset to those with the most basic of programming understanding. For instance, the voice controls shown off after the break are provided by a single bracket which uses conditional statements to ‘listen’ for the words on, off, and blink. You’ll find the voice recognition diagram after the break as well.

You could try to go completely graphical with this project. There’s the option of programming the Arduino side of the project in a similar way.

app-inventor-voice-controls


Filed under: arduino hacks


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