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Archive for the ‘Robots’ Category

One of the simplest ways to make a mobile robot involves differential steering, where two wheels move at different speeds as needed to turn, and a roller on the back keeps it from tipping over. The MrK_Blockvader is an excellent take on this type of bot, demonstrated in the first clip below. It features a nice blocky body comprised out of 3D-printed parts, wheels driven by tiny gear motors, and an integrated roller ball on the back.

The MrK_Blockvader is controlled via an Arduino Nano, along with an nRF24 breakout that allows it to receive signals from a radio transmitter unit. The build includes LED lighting as well as a piezo buzzer for all the beeps and boops. It can also take advantage of various sensors if necessary.

The eventual goal is to use the MrK_Blockvader in a network of robots, hinted at in the second video with a worker at its side.

Poisonous plants, like poison ivy, can really ruin your day. In an effort to combat this “green menace,” YouTuber Sciencish decided to create his own quadruped robot.

The robotic dog is equipped with two servos per leg, for a total eight, which enable it to move its shoulders and elbows back and forth.

An Arduino Uno controller determines leg positions via trigonometric calculation, and when in position, it dispenses weed killer via a relay and aquarium pump setup. The reservoir can also be used to hold other liquids, whether for watering duties or even to provide extra fuel to a fire.

If you’d like to build a walking biped robot, this 3D-printed design by Technovation looks like a fantastic place to start. Each leg features three servos that actuate it at the hip, knee, and ankle for a total of six degrees of freedom.

Control is handled by an Arduino Uno board that rides on top of the legs, along with a perfboard to connect to the servos directly.

Movements are calculated via inverse kinematics, meaning one simply has to input the x and z positions, and the Arduino calculates the proper servo angles. The bot is even able to take steps between two and 10 centimeters without falling over.

The Internet has been perhaps more important than ever to keep us connected these days. Available technology, however, apparently wasn’t good enough for brothers Hunter and Josh Irving, who built their own telepresence robot using parts on-hand during their own two-person hackathon.

The robot they came up with, dubbed TELEBOT, features a partially 3D-printed face along with a set of chattering teeth and eyes recycled from an antique doll. An Arduino Uno is used to take audio signals from remote “guests,” simulating their facial expressions with servos that drive its mouth and LED-lit eyes. 

The duo designed TELEBOT’s “body” out of an adjustable lamp for manual movement. And, as an added bonus, the device is capable of glowing in the dark and can be customized with a wizard, cowboy or top hat. 

While it might not be the most comforting robot you’ve ever seen, it looks like a fun build! 

Daniel Hingston wanted to build a four-legged walking robot for several years, and with current coronavirus restrictions he finally got his chance. His 3D-printed robodog, dubbed “GoodBoy,” is reminiscent of a miniature version of Boston Dynamics’ Spot, which helped inspired the project. 

It’s extremely clean, with wiring integrated into the legs mid-print. Two micro servos per leg move it in a forward direction, controlled by an Arduino Uno.

Obstacle avoidance is provided by a pair of ultrasonic sensor “eyes,” allowing it to stop when something is in its path. An LDR sensor is also implemented, which when covered by its human minder commands it to present its paw for shaking.

Be sure to check out a short demo of GoodBoy below! 

Gregory Leveque has created an adorable 3D-printed robot that not only walks on four legs, but folds up into a ball when not in use. 

To accomplish this, the round quadruped utilizes one servo to deploy each leg via a parallelogram linkage system and another to move it forwards and backwards. A clever single-servo assembly is also implemented on the bottom to fill gaps left by the legs.

The device is controlled by an Arduino Nano, along with a 16-channel servo driver board. Obstacle avoidance is handled via an ultrasonic sensor, which sticks out of the top half of the sphere and rotates side to side using yet another servo. 

It’s an impressive mechanical build, especially considering its diminutive size of 130mm (5.12in) in diameter.

Mech-Dickel Robotics has designed a beautiful quadruped robot dubbed mechDOG, which utilizes a dozen servos for motion. This gives each leg three degrees of freedom, allowing the cat-sized beast to travel a meter in 8.46 seconds. While it won’t break any speed records, creating a walking motion on this sort of unstable platform is an impressive feat in itself.

mechDOG is controlled by an Arduino Uno, while a Lynxmotion Smart Servo Adapter Board interfaces with the servos themselves. The device is remote-controlled via an RF unit, though it does have a pair of ultrasonic sensors that presumably could be used for obstacle avoidance. 

You can check it out in action in the videos below, looking sharp in its yellow-finished aluminum sheet metal chassis.

Will Cogley, known for his awesome animatronics, has created a robotic mouth that’s already a work of art and could form the basis of something even more amazing. 

The device features an array of servo mechanisms to actuate its jaw, forceps, cheeks, and a tongue. The cheek assemblies are particularly interesting, employing two servos each and a linkage system that allows it to move in a variety of positions.

For control, the project uses a Python program to break typed sentences up into individual sounds. It then sends these to an Arduino, which poses the mouth in sequence. Cogley has also experimented with microphone input and hopes to explore motion capture with it in the future.

For TEDx Copenhagen 2019, MAKESOME was contacted about building a trash can. Not just any ordinary waste bin, however, but one that would fit in with their theme of “expect the unexpected” by driving around and being rude to participants. From the video, the bot looks like it was a great success, and something that caught attendees off guard with its “in your face” attitude.

Mechanically, the base of the device is an omniwheel robot, which moves in any direction under the power of four DC gearmotors. An Arduino Uno is the brains of the project, with user interface provided by a PlayStation gamepad over Bluetooth. A Nano takes controls motors, while an MP3 module, amp, and speakers allow it to conversate and joke around while receiving their refuse.

The robot is built around an Arduino Uno used as the main controller and an Arduino Nano for the motor control. Commucation is via an USB Host Shield and a Bluetooth dongle. 2 MDD10A 2.0 motorcontrollers were used to control the 4 JGB37-550 motors. The mp3 player is a Serial mp3 player v1.0 and the amplifier and speakers come from a set of Z150 Logitech computer speakers. Battery is a Tattu 22000 mAh, 14.8V 4 cells LiPo battery. A DC-DC converter was used to deliver 5V for the controllers.

If you want to “enhance your athletic training regimen,” or perhaps just have a bit of fun with robotically launched ping pong balls, then be sure to check out the Pingo apparatus shown in the video below. This robot moves back and forth on four DC motor-powered wheels, searching for targets with an ultrasonic rangefinder.

When something comes into view, Pingo adjusts its ping pong launching tube’s angle to match the target distance, then loads a ball and flings it into the air with a pair of spinning disks. 

The device is controlled by an Arduino Mega and uses a half-dozen DC motors, a pair of steppers, and even a servo to accomplish its mission.



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