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Archive for the ‘screen’ Category

When building projects with a simple goal in mind, it’s not unheard of for us to add more and more switches, buttons, and complexity as the project goes through its initial prototyping stages. Feature creep like this tends to result in a tangled mess rather than a usable project. With enough focus, though, it’s possible to recognize when it’s happening and keep to the original plans. On the other hand, this single-button project with more than one use seems to be the opposite of feature creep. (YouTube, embedded below.)

[Danko]’s project has one goal: be as useful as possible while only using a single button and a tiny screen. Right now the small handheld device can be used as a stopwatch, a counter, and can even play a rudimentary version of flappy bird. It uses an Arduino Pro Mini, a 64×48 OLED screen running on I2C, and has a miniscule 100 mAh 3.7V battery to power everything. The video is worth watching if you’ve never worked with this small of a screen before, too.

Getting three functions out of a device with only one button is a pretty impressive feat, and if you can think of any other ways of getting more usefulness out of something like this be sure to leave it in the comments below. [Danko] is no stranger to simple projects with tiny screens, either. We recently featured his homebrew Arduino calculator that uses an even smaller screen.

Gen
30

An award-winning LCD with an Arduino built-in (using only 2 pins!)

arduino, ArduinoAtHeart, LCD, screen, Touch Commenti disabilitati su An award-winning LCD with an Arduino built-in (using only 2 pins!) 

arLCD

 

We are happy to announce a new entry in the Arduino At Heart program. It’s called arLCD by EarthMake, an US based company with the mission to introduce ezLCD technology produced by its sister company EarthLCD to the Maker Market through special products.

The new Arduino at Heart is not just an LCD and you should not confuse it with a snails pace 2.8 LCD shield that uses almost all your I/O pins!

arLCD is a full smart ezLCD GPU with the Arduino Uno R3 on the same PCB in a thin, easy to integrate package with a panel mount bezel available in the near future.

The 3.5 has 64% more display area than a 2.8 LCD. The arLCD combines the Arduino and the award winning ezLCD into a single product, ready to accept all Arduino compatible shields. The arLCD can be used in many applications such as thermostat control, lighting controls, home security, audio control, water level gauge, robotics, operational control, and button switches.

In the video demo you can see how it works. Jazz shows us how to switch screens and display different programs. The first sketch is an design tool for choosing the colors for the screen layout, the second app explores a thermostat prototyped on a breadboard using a thermistor to read the current temperature and turn on/off an led.

Want to learn more? Take a look at the documentation, download the library and then check the introductory video below:

 

 

If you’re interested add your email on this page and get notified when available in the Arduino Store.

Feb
25

Using a flashing LCD monitor to transfer data

arduino hacks, data transfer, flashing, ldr, light sensor, monitor, screen, temt6000 Commenti disabilitati su Using a flashing LCD monitor to transfer data 

lcd-screen-data-transferWe love the concept of using an LCD screen to transfer data. The most wide-spread and successful method we know of is the combination of a QR code and the camera on a smart phone. But for less powerful/costly devices data can be transferred simply by flashing colors on the screen. That’s what [Connor Taylor] is testing out with this project. He’s using a TEMT6000 light sensor to turn a white and black flashing monitor into binary data.

So far this is just a proof of concept that takes measurements from the light sensor which is held in front of a Macbook Retina display with different backlight levels. At 3/4 and full brightness it provides more than enough contrast to reliably differentiate between black and white when measuring the sensor with the Arduino’s ADC. What he hasn’t gotten into yet is the timing necessary to actually transfer data. The issue arises when you need to have multiple 1′s or 0′s in a row. We’ve tried this ourselves using an LDR with limited success. We know it’s possible to get it working since we’ve seen projects like this clock which can only be programmed with a flashing screen.

[Connor's] choice of the TEMT6000 should prove to be a lot more sensitive than using just an LDR. We figure he could find a way to encode using multiple colors in order to speed up the data transfer.


Filed under: arduino hacks


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