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Archive for the ‘servo motor’ Category

mechbox

Les Boites Mécaniques are a set of four automated boxes that produce music out of wood and metal. These experimental instruments enable anyone to explore the magic of making sound by pressing buttons on a remote, which activate each respective device to vibrate, knock, and rub materials.

The boxes were developed by Kogumi‘s Anatole Buttin and Yan Godat for educational electronic music workshops, and can be played either solo or in unison. There’s even a mode that allows users to control it all via MIDI notes on a computer.

In terms of hardware, each box is equipped with an Arduino Uno, a TLC59711 LED driver, step motors with AccelStepper library and a 3D-printed microstep driver.

Watch the video below to see how it all comes together to create a unique sound!

Google showed the world that you could make a virtual reality headset from cardboard. We figure that might have been [Uladz] inspiration for creating a robotic arm also made out of cardboard. He says you can reproduce his design in about two hours.

You’ll need an Arduino and four hobby servo motors. The cardboard doesn’t weigh much, so you could probably use fairly small motors. In addition to the cardboard, there’s a piece of hardboard for the base and a few metal clips. You can control it all from the Arduino program or add an IR receiver if you want to run it by remote control. There’s a video of the arm–called CARDBIRD–in action, below.

If you want to build something more robust, we’ve looked at some serious arms before. If you want to go big, we’ve seen that before, too. But every project has to start somewhere, and a cardboard mock-up is one of our favorite things.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, robots hacks

at-at

Dave Stein is a software engineer during the day and a tinkerer on Arduino projects in his free time after work. He submitted on the blog his first Arduino project with the goal of powering his old AT-AT Walker toy (mid 1980s) with Arduino Uno and make it walk and perform some of the functions we see in the Star Wars movies.

AT-AT (All Terrain Armored Transport) are four-legged combat walkers 22.5mt (73.8ft) tall of the Galactic Empire, one of its most famous military symbols introduced  in “Star Wars V: The Empire strikes back”, and we may see them again in the next weeks on “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” the upcoming episode of the saga opening December 18th.

The AT-AT walker toy updated by Dave is controlled by a wired Xbox 360 controller that interfaces with a computer and transports a signal to the Arduino Uno for walker movement:

The left and right triggers move the walker forward and backward while the right stick moves the head horizontally. If you have ever played with this toy you may remember it was clumsy and difficult to move. In my project I wanted to learn about and conquer the difficulties of quadrupedal movement. The realization process for my project involved a massive amount of trial and error, research, and failures. I have to say that I failed many more times than I succeeded with configuring the servos with the Arduino. I went down many long roads to learn about prototyping with the breadboard, soldering, and redesigns of the final product. The most difficult part of the project aside from adjusting the gait of the walker for balance and movement was providing enough power to the servos without frying the microcontroller or any of the components. I was finally able to overcome these difficulties by implementing the Adafruit servo shield.

Check AtAt Project website for all info, parts list and upcoming tutorial!

wings

Wing is an interactive installation created by Dmitry Morozov  and commissioned by the Center for Art and Media (ZKM) in Karlsruhe, special for GLOBALE: Exo-Evolution exhibition, 2015. It’s a 2,5-meter wing that can be flapped by visitors thanks to compact dermal myLeaographic sensors (sensors measuring the electrical potential of muscles) installed  behind their ears and connected to an Arduino Uno:

The main idea of the project is an ironical and at the same time serious research on the topic of development of new instruments and prostheses as “extensions” of human body and accordingly its possibilities and potentials, which are being revealed by new technologies. At the same time, it’s an attempt to stimulate people to perceive and train the body in a different way, expanding the limits of self-control and self-organisation in order to adapt to the new conditions. At the same time, just like many spiritual practices aiming at the elevation of human soul through deep relaxation and control over seemingly uncontrollable muscles, this project uses the metaphor of flying as a reward for the ability to direct your mind to solving of non-standard tasks.

9_670

Feb
14

Build a Touchscreen Controlled Marionette with Intel Galileo

ArduinoCertified, Galileo, Intel Galileo, lasercut, leds, servo, servo motor, tutorial Commenti disabilitati su Build a Touchscreen Controlled Marionette with Intel Galileo 

image00

Making gets really interesting and fun especially when mixing laser cut shapes, servo motor, tft screen, MDF, plexiglass and Intel Galileo Gen 2. After you assemble the parts and follow the steps of this tutorial, you’ll be able to control the puppet through an interface on the screen. Enjoy the tutorial!

We are going to have a little fun with the Intel® Galileo development board. This time around, we’ll make a simple puppet control system. We’ve put together a “running robot” marionette with a simple mechanism that uses a continuous servo. We’ll be use a touchscreen interface to control various outputs using sliders and switches.

As always, you can modify the designs to suit your needs. We will teach you how to incorporate touchscreens, and make the interface necessary for controlling the Intel® Galileo Gen 2 board.

Just so you know, the instructions this time around are quite long. That’s due to the assembly of the marionette. I would review the assembly instructions fully before attempting to put it together. While it looks long and complicated, if you group the parts, it much simpler.

So, let’s start the puppet show!

Follow the link and start making!

marionette

Gen
27

Design a LEGO-compatible servo holder and print it with Materia 101

3D printing, 3DPrinting, arduino, Featured, LEGO, materia 101, Materia101, servo motor, tutorial, tutorials Commenti disabilitati su Design a LEGO-compatible servo holder and print it with Materia 101 

Materiatut7

This week we are presenting you a new tutorial on 3d printing of Lego-compatible pieces with Materia 101. Kristoffer designed a brick with the parametric 3d modeler FreeCAD that can hold a small servo. Following the 10-step instructions  you can easily add wheels to robots built in LEGO and  use specific servos with different sizes.


Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

materiatut7-3

Giu
08

Attiny PWM Generator and Servo Tester

arduino hacks, attiny, instructable, pulse-width modulation, PWM, servo, servo motor, Tool, tool hacks Commenti disabilitati su Attiny PWM Generator and Servo Tester 

PWM-Servo-Tester

Having the right tool for the job makes all the difference, especially for the types of projects we feature here at Hackaday. [Jan_Henrik's] must agree with this sentiment, one of his latest projects involves building a tool to generate a PWM signal and test servos using an Attiny25/45/85.

Tools come in all kinds of different shapes and sizes. Even if it might not be as widely used as [Jan_Henrik's] earlier work that combines an oscilloscope and signal generator, having a tool that you can rely upon to test servos and generate a PWM can be very useful. This well written Instructable provides all the details you need to build your own, including the schematic and the necessary code (available on GitHub). The final PWM generator looks great. For simple projects, sometimes a protoboard is all you need. It would be very cool to see a custom PCB made for this project in the future.

What tools have you build recently? Indeed, there is a tool for every problem. Think outside the (tool) box and let us know what you have made!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, tool hacks
Apr
29

Make your lasercut datamonster with Intel Galileo

arduino, ArduinoCertified, datamonster, Galileo, Intel Galileo, sensors, servo motor Commenti disabilitati su Make your lasercut datamonster with Intel Galileo 

datamonster

Datamonsters are creatures that respond to you. They can see you and respond to your presence and movement. In addition to responding to immediate interactions, they can also be influenced by events happening in the world outside.

 

The project you see in the picture was made by Lucas Ainsworth  using Intel Galileo board and needs 3 main things:

- a physical structure
The physical structure uses commonly available materials and a relatively easy-to build wooden kit pattern, so that the physical form “gets out of the way”
as much as possible. If you cut this kit and put it together, you will have a robot with 5 joints: waist rotation, waist elevation, mid-body elevation, neck rotation, and head movement.

- sensing
For this version, we’re using 3 long range active IR sensors for simplicity and low cost. This sensor pack estimates object location in 3D space. Next gen could possibly use a webcam and OpenCV to include face-detection and motion in addition to presence.

- software
This is where the fun is and where the most work remains to be done. We have code for the Arduino IDE (written for the Intel Galileo board) that you
can use to calibrate and control your monster. If you use our code unchanged, you’ll have some basic reactions to objects, and a connection over WiFi to Thingspeak. Thingspeak is an easy-to-use repository for data collected from the internet or any data sources you create.

You can make your own Datamonster following the detailed documentation at this link. The Galileo code to get started (for the Arduino IDE) is on GitHub.

 

datamonster2

Ott
09

Moti on Kickstarter: spin the dials and the motors follow!

kickstarter, motor, Robot, servo motor, servos Commenti disabilitati su Moti on Kickstarter: spin the dials and the motors follow! 

moti on kickstarted

Moti is a smart motor you can control from an app . It allows to use your fingers directly on the screen to move the motor, adjust speed with sliders and even program motions with simple building blocks. You can attach it to any kind of objects and bring them to life with intuitive and easily understandable steps.

At the same time Moti is advanced enough to satisfy makers and developers who are looking to build complex robots. Each one is programmable with Arduino, has bunch of built-in sensors, daisy-chains, and even has a web-API so you can develop sites and games for your robot.

Nick wrote us:

Our aim with Moti is to make robotics accessible to everyone by providing a
tool that’s as intuitive to use as a hammer. Simply attach Moti smart motors to anything and then use the graphical app to bring your creation to life…spin the dials and the motors follow. Presto, instant robot!

Moti was born out of our frustrations in building robots.  We’ve just done a lot of the grunt work so you don’t have to.

At present, a lot of low level work is required to get a robot moving, and that prevents most people from exploring beyond the basics, if at all. Moti simplifies robotics so more people can apply it to interests such as amateur filmmaking, animatronics, window displays, art projects, 3D printed robots, DIY toys, RC vehicles, home automation and much more.

In the 80′s computing shifted from labs and industry into everyday life. We think robotics is ready for a similar shift, and Moti is here to help that happen.

They are on Kickstarter now! See how it works:

 

Giu
11

A painting machine sensing your touch

Android, arduino, diy, DUE, painting, servo motor Commenti disabilitati su A painting machine sensing your touch 

arduino android painting machine

 

Kris Temmerman, a freelance creative developer based in Belgium, just published a nice report on how he built a painting machine running on an Arduino Due and an Android tablet.

I was always interested to remove the perfection from computer graphics. So thought it would be fun to try to make the most obvious thing first. A machine that uses a paint brush to print a drawing.

arduino painting detail

As you can see from the video below, Kris was able to translate the pen pressure on the tablet into specific brush strokes on the paper:

Follow the link to discover the code on github and enjoy the painting!

 



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