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Okay, we’ve just left May and stepped into June, why are we talking about Arduino Day — traditionally a March 16th event where makers congregate and share projects? I live in Ho Chi Minh City, and the event tends to take place in mid-May, but the enthusiasm and collaborative spirit are just as strong. Organized by the awesome local maker group Fablab Saigon with the venue provided by Intek Institute, there were some neat projects on display along with some talks from local companies.

The first thing that struck me about the event was how young the maker movement is here – most attendees were still in high school or early university. By contrast, I was 23 when I first learned to use AVR microcontrollers with assembly language (by the time Arduino started to get traction the boat effectively missed me). I couldn’t help but feel like a bit of a relic, at least until we all started talking excitedly about robots (I had brought a couple). It seems that geeking out about electronics is the great equalizer which knows no age limits.

Tesla Coils, Blinking Circuits, and Robot Races

Among the projects on display was this low-power Tesla coil, happily making small sparks, turning on CCFL bulbs in its immediate vicinity, and generating a bit of plasma too.

There was a learn to solder workshop for attendees to join in anytime and produce artful dead-bug style transistor multivibrator circuits.

Many of you will be familiar with the astable multivibrator circuit seen here as a popular introduction to electronics and soldering. But if you’re not, it’s a good place to start as you’ll learn about several different components, and the result has blinking lights… while leaving your Arduino free to be used in other projects! Someone had also brought in a bit of a show-and-tell on using GSM modules here.

Next there was a workshop where rover-style robots were built from a locally developed STEM education kit called GaraStem. Fundamentally, it’s a tacklebox filled with instructions, laser-cut chassis parts, an Arduino compatible board and sensors, and an Android control application for your smartphone. It looked easy and fun to work with, and I wish that STEM robot kits like this were available when I was a kid. I can’t help but feel a little jealous – all we had in my area when I was in high school was the occasional science fair!

Of course, any time more than one remote controlled robot is in the same place, a race is necessary and we got right to that. Entirely by coincidence, the floors were painted in a way that sort of looked like a racetrack.

Talks from Hardware Startups

Besides the projects and workshops, there was a track of talks from local companies on what they’ve been up to. One of them, called Indruino, designs their own Arduino boards for use in industrial environments, along with all the bells and whistles that requires. They had a good demo of a speed controller for a 3-phase motor, and talked about what they’ve done to make the platform suitable for industrial use.

At the very least, I could tell that their boards made ample use of optoisolators, secure connectors, and high quality shielded DC-DC converters. According to their pamphlet, they’ve already deployed in a number of factories, with industrial touchscreens and a freeze-drying system controller — not surprising as freeze dried foods is an industry that has really been taking off in Vietnam the last few years and designing what you can locally is a good move.

Vulcan Augmentics, a local startup that designs modular prosthetic limbs was there to present their work on practical human-machine interfaces. For a variety of reasons, there are quite a few amputees of all ages in Vietnam, and so any effort to better serve them is certainly appreciated. Unfortunately, their prosthetic limbs were either overseas or in use at the time, so I couldn’t examine the hardware. Nonetheless, it’s a nice example of how the skills we learn as a hobby can one day develop to the point where we can make a positive impact on another person’s life.

I presented some IoT use cases and demos, many of which I’ve written about here, along with some notes on the importance and implementation of security such as MQTT with either AES or TLS. I also talked about ways to define reliable failure states for IoT devices in case of loss of connectivity. While it’s an extreme example, you can’t have a large robot plow into a wall because the last command received before a connection loss was ‘go forward’! Of course, there exists the argument that we shouldn’t be connecting dangerous robots to the Internet frivolously in the first place, but it’s not very interesting and the lessons in control systems still apply. It was good fun and no robot, human, or architecture was harmed.

Chúc mừng sinh nhật Arduino!

Even the Cake was High Tech

At the end of the day, there was the requisite cake (strawberry jam). The local bakeries have something like a type of marzipan sheet that they can print on at a surprisingly good resolution, and the cake featured some pretty good imagery as a result.

The event wrapped up with a trivia competition, with some kits that had been donated as prizes for the highest scores.

Overall the sense of community at the event was strong, and despite the fairly high attendance it was well organized. My hat is off to Fablab Saigon for putting it together.

Back on Arduino Day, we announced the winners of the Arduino Day Community Challenge, awarding the best community projects and their impact on the local and global community.

The contest collected more than 120 projects from all over the world, broken down into seven different categories: home automation, social innovation, kids and education, environment and space, robotics, audio and visual arts, small scale manufacturing, and startups.

With this blog post, we want to inaugurate a series where we learn more about each of the winning entries. The first project highlighted is Andruino, the best submission from the ‘home automation’ category. Prototyped in Palermo (Italy) by Andrea Scavuzzo, Andruino is an Arduino-based smart home system that enables users to control the devices around their house in real-time via an accompanying app, the AndruinoApp.

What’s the project about?

‘The Andruino ecosystem is based on the AndruinoApp and a number of Arduino-compatible nodes (e.g. Arduino Mega, NodeMCU, ESP8266 or STM32 Nucleo boards). Once the hardware is configured with the AndruinoApp, users will be able to communicate with their nodes (over a proprietary IoT infrastructure), checking their status, and controlling the devices in real-time. For instance, with Andruino you can control the room temperature, the humidity, and check if your door is locked all in an instant via your phone. Moreover, you can also record the data and create graphs to analyse consumption around your home to make it more efficient.’

What inspired you to develop this project?

With my phone in my hands, I thought that my mobile device was the best interface for my Arduino.

What is the impact of Andruino on the local/global community?

I have created an easy to use, open-source and inexpensive remote control system for the home… almost everyone can benefit from it.  

What are the next developments for your project?

I want to prototype ‘Garagino,’ a remote control system for my garage.

How can we learn more about Andruino?

You can visit my website, or check out my write-up on the Arduino Project Hub.

Watch the video below as Andrea Scavuzzo presents Andruino to the Arduino community.

This year’s Arduino Day, held on March 16th, consisted of 659 celebrations across 106 countries with talks, project exhibitions, open activities, workshops, live demos, hackathons, and Ask the Expert sessions.

The Official Arduino Day event took place in Milan, in collaboration with Manifattura (see photos), where Massimo Banzi and Fabio Violante unveiled some important figures on Arduino, including the number of IDE downloads over the last year (28M), active users (863K), and Forum contributors (762K). They also presented the latest additions to the MKR family — the MKR GPS Shield, the MKR RGB Shield, the MKR ENV Shield and the MKR THERM Shield — as well as announced the development of the Vidor Visual Composer.

Other keynote sessions by our team focused on Arduino and the open source community, the winners of the Arduino Day Community Challenge, the new Arduino IoT Cloud, and highlights around Arduino Education.

Were you unable to join us in Italy or tune in to the Arduino Day live stream? Well, we’ve got some good news. You can watch the event in its entirety below, including the AMA with Massimo Banzi!

We are immensely proud of the amazing success of Arduino Day 2019, and we want to THANK all of the communities that helped make this special occasion possible. Already looking ahead to next year? Mark your calendars, because Arduino Day 2020 will be taking place on March 21st. In the meantime, don’t forget to share any images or videos of your Arduino Day fun with the hashtag #ArduinoD19!

Arduino Day is quickly approaching and we are blown away by the amazing support of the Arduino community, with over 620 events in more than 100 countries scheduled for March 16th.

As recently announced, the Official Arduino Day (register here)—directly organized by the Arduino team—will be held in Milan at the Milano Luiss Hub for Maker and Students, in collaboration with Manifattura Milano Camp.

The agenda of the official event includes an exhibition of Arduino projects, free kids activities, several keynotes by Arduino team members, and last but not least, an ‘Ask Me Anything’ with Massimo Banzi. The talks and the AMA will be live streamed via Arduino’s homepage, YouTube, and Facebook.

Here’s a look at the Official Arduino Day’s program:

11 AM (CET): Doors open and exhibition of Arduino projects, in collaboration with WeMake

2:30 – 5:30 PM: EDU activities for children ages 5 to 15

1:45 – 3:15 PM: Talks by local makers, in collaboration with WeMake (in Italian)

3:30 – 5:30 PM: Keynotes by the Arduino team. These sessions will be streamed on Arduino’s homepage, YouTube, and Facebook.

3:30 – 3:35: Welcome by Massimo Banzi and Fabio Violante

3:35 – 3:50: The State of Arduino with Massimo Banzi and Fabio Violante

3:50 – 4:15: Winners of the Arduino Day Community Challenge

4:15 – 4:30: Arduino and the open-source community

4:30 – 5:00: Arduino for IoT with Luca Cipriani and Gianluca Varisco

5:00 – 5:15: Arduino Education with Nerea de la Riva Iriepa

5:15 – 5:30: Closing remarks

6:00-7:00 PM: Ask Me Anything with Massimo Banzi

The AMA will also be streamed on the Arduino homepage, YouTube and Facebook. Have a question? Please register on the Arduino Forum and submit it by 6:45 PM (CET) at this link.

We look forward to celebrating Arduino Day with everyone!  In the meantime, don’t forget to share your events on social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD19.

Mancano poche ore ad Arduino Day, e siamo grati ed emozionati per l’incredibile supporto della nostra Community, che organizzerà nella giornata del 16 Marzo 2019 oltre 620 eventi in oltre 100 nazioni.

Come annunciato di recente, Official Arduino Day, ovvero l’evento direttamente organizzato dal team Arduino (registrazione qui) si terrà a Milano presso Milano Luiss Hub for Maker and Students (Via Massimo D’Azeglio, 3 – zona Porta Garibaldi), in collaborazione con Manifattura Milano Camp.

L’agenda dell’evento ufficiale include una mostra di progetti Arduino, delle attività edu per bambini/e teenager dai 5 ai 15 anni, un programma di talk con il team Arduino e, infine, una sessione di Ask Me Anything con Massimo Banzi. Le talk e l’AMA saranno trasmessi in streaming sull’homepage di Arduino e sui canali Youtube e Facebook .

Ecco il programma di Official Arduino Day a Milano:

11.00 AM: Open Day e mostra di progetti Arduino, in collaborazione con WeMake

1.45 – 3.15 PM: Community Talk a cura di maker locali, in collaborazione con WeMake

2.30 – 5.30 PM: Attività educative per bambine/i e teenager. Le attività sono gratuire e continuative, non serve prenotazione.

  • 5-8 anni: Laboratorio di pasta modellabile conduttiva Anche i più piccoli possono giocare con l’elettricità! Con la pasta modellabile si può dare spazio alla manualità e alla creatività, con (in più) la magia dei led!
  • 8-12 anni: Laboratorio di tinkering “Voglio Fare l’Inventore” Oggi tutti possono fare gli inventori! Flussi di energia, luci, suoni e movimenti non sono mai stati così facili da realizzare. Programmando con i sensori e attuatori, si possono costruire un’elica, un semaforo e addirittura un braccio robotico.
  • 12-15 anni: Laboratorio di robotica “mBot and basic robotics” I robot sono tutti intorno a noi, non solo umanoidi ma anche automobili ed elettrodomestici! Con un’ app, cacciaviti e un pizzico d’ingegno, è possibile imparare le prime mosse per dargli vita e controllarli!

3.30 – 5.30 PM: Talk con Massimo Banzi e Arduino team. Le talk saranno disponibili via streaming sui canali social Arduino.

3.30 – 3.35: Welcome con Massimo Banzi e Fabio Violante

3.35 – 3.50: The State of Arduino con Massimo Banzi e Fabio Violante

3.50 – 4.15: Arduino Day Community Challenge: Winners

4.15 – 4.30: Arduino and the open-source community

4.30 – 5.00: Arduino for IoT con Luca Cipriani e Gianluca Varisco

5.00 – 5.15: Arduino Education con Nerea de la Riva Iriepa

5.15 – 5.30: Chiusura

6.00 – 7.00 PM: Ask Me Anything con Massimo Banzi

Anche l’AMA (Ask me anything) sarà trasmesso in streaming sulla homepage di Arduino e sui canali Youtube e Facebook. Vuoi fare una domanda? Per favore, registrati sull’Arduino Forum e invia la tua domanda entro le 6.45 cliccando qui.

Non vediamo l’ora di festeggiare Arduino Day, nel frattempo non dimenticarti di condividere  il tuo evento sui social con l’hashtag #ArduinoD19.

We at Arduino believe that the combination of our technology and your passion make it possible to have an impact on everyone’s everyday life. Ingenuity, innovation, and social good are the cornerstones of our community, and we want to celebrate those traits with a contest whose winners will be announced on Arduino Day.

The Arduino Day Community Challenge aims to award the best community projects that can have a lasting effect on some or all of us. Seven winning entries will be selected, one in each of the following categories:

  • Social innovation
  • Kids and education
  • Home automation
  • Environment & space
  • Robotics
  • Audio and visual arts
  • Small scale manufacturing and startups

Prizes include boards, hardware, and other goodies valued up to €1,000. If you want to apply, please fill out this form by March 3rd. Aside from a description, you will need to upload a photo or video of your work. The winners will be revealed on Arduino Day during the live stream from our official celebration in Milan.

And remember: we are seeking inspirational, problem-solving projects that represent the core values of Arduino Day and can improve the lives of others! Let’s make a difference, together.

As recently announced, Arduino Day 2019 will be celebrated on March 16th. If you plan on organizing your your own event, don’t forget to submit your proposal by March 3rd!

We have already received a hundred submissions from all across the globe and will continue to update our map regularly with new events — we are hoping to make it even bigger and better than last year!

As we prepare for the festivities, we have an important announcement for our community: the Arduino team will be holding this year’s official event at Milano Luiss Hub for Makers and Students in Milan, Italy.

The Official Arduino Day program will include an exhibition area with Arduino projects, a talk area, and an activity space for kids. The event is organized in collaboration with Manifattura Milano, a local initiative dedicated to craftsmanship, urban manufacturing and Industry 4.0 promoted by Milan Municipality – Labour Policies department.  

We are currently seeking makers, speakers and activities for the Official Arduino Day in Milan. If you are able to physically attend and/or want to showcase your creations and their impact on your community, please fill out this form by March 3rd. Additionally, we are looking for volunteers to help out during the event, welcoming guests and assisting visitors. If you are interested in this opportunity, please feel free to complete this application. The call for local makers and volunteers will be powered by WeMake.

On Arduino Day, we will also support LoRa and the City, a hackathon organized by Codemotion and A2A, that will take place in Milan at Casa dell’Energia from March 16th to 17th. If you want to join the hackathon as an individual or a group, apply here — the winners of the two challenges (urban mobility and monitoring and energy and sustainability) will receive a €3,000 Amazon coupon.

Stay tuned over the next few weeks as we will be providing updates on the Official Arduino Day agenda. In the meantime, don’t forget to apply on the Arduino Day website and share your celebration on social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD19.


Come annunciato di recente, il 16 marzo celebreremo Arduino Day 2019; se volete festeggiare con noi e organizzare un evento community, avete tempo fino al 3 marzo per mandare la vostra proposta attraverso questo form!

Abbiamo già ricevuto un centinaio di candidature da tutto il mondo e continueremo ad aggiornare regolarmente la nostra mappa con nuovi eventi: speriamo di renderlo ancora più grande rispetto agli scorsi anni!

Mentre ci prepariamo per la festa, abbiamo un annuncio importante per la nostra community: Official Arduino Day, ovvero quello organizzato dal team Arduino, per il 2019 si terrà al Milano Luiss Hub for Makers and Students a Milano!

Il programma prevede un’area espositiva con progetti Arduino, un’area talk e uno spazio per con attività gratuite per i più piccoli. L’evento è organizzato in collaborazione con Manifattura Milano, l’iniziativa dedicata all’artigianato, alla produzione urbana e all’Industria 4.0 promossa dal Comune di Milano – Assessorato Politiche del Lavoro.

Call for maker and volunteers! Stiamo cercando maker e speaker per l’Official Arduino Day a Milano. Se puoi partecipare fisicamente all’evento e vuoi mostrare il tuo progetto o raccontare l’impatto che ha avuto sulla tua comunità, completa questo form entro il 3 marzo. Stiamo anche cercando volontari e volontarie che diano una mano durante l’evento, dando il benvenuto ai nostri ospiti, oppure aiutandoci con le attività. Se ti interessa questa opportunità, compila questo form. La call for maker and volunteers di Milano e dintorni è supportata da WeMake.

Durante Arduino Day, daremo supporto ad un’altra iniziativa a Milano, LoRa and the City, un hackathon che avrà luogo presso la Casa dell’Energia tra il 16 e il 17 Marzo. Se vuoi partecipare come singolo o con il tuo gruppo, clicca qui – in palio per le due sfide dell’hackathon (Urban Mobility and monitoring and Energy and Sustainability) ci saranno due buoni da 3000 € per Amazon.

Continua a seguirci, durante le prossime settimane condivideremo tutti i dettagli dell’agenda di Arduino Day. Nel frattempo, non dimenticarti di mandare la tua application attraverso il sito di Arduino Day e di condividere i festeggiamenti sui social con l’hashtag #ArduinoD19.

For the sixth year, we are inviting the open source community to join us for Arduino Day 2019 on Saturday, March 16th!

Arduino Day is a worldwide celebration of Arduino’s birthday. It’s a 24-hour-long event—organized by both the community and our team—where those interested in Arduino get together, share their experiences, and learn more about the platform. Participation is open to anyone, either as a organizer or participant, from makers and students to professional developers and educators.

In 2018, there were 529 events spanning across the globe full of activities, workshops, talks, and project exhibitions for a wide range of audiences and skill sets. This year, we are hoping to make Arduino Day even bigger! If you want to organize an event, please fill out this online form and submit your proposal by March 3rd.

For the fifth year in a row we are inviting the open-source community to join us for Arduino Day 2018 on Saturday, May 12th!

Arduino Day is a worldwide celebration of Arduino’s birthday. It’s a 24 hours-long event–organized by the community and our team–where people interested in Arduino get together, share their experiences, and learn more about the platform.  Participation is open to anyone, either as a local organizer or participant.

In 2017, there were 499 global events consisting of various activities, workshops, talks, and project exhibitions for a wide range of audiences and skill sets. This year, we are hoping to pass the 500 mark! If you want to organize an Arduino Day festivity, please fill out this online form and submit your proposal by April 29th.

Over the next few weeks, make sure to visit the Arduino Day website to learn more or locate an event in your area. Moreover, don’t forget to spread the word on social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD18! 

On April 1st, Arduino Day was celebrated by more than 499 communities in 79 different countries, with official events held in Turin, Malmo and San Jose.

In Turin (photos can be found here), Massimo Banzi and Federico Musto unveiled the latest developments of the Arduino platform, including products like the MKRFOX1200, NFC Shield, LoRA Gateway Shield, LoRA Node Shield, as well as the Casetta and Libretto Kits. Moreover, they also highlighted new improvements to Arduino Create, particularly its expansion to Chromebook users, and recent advancements of Arduino’s educational project, CTC.  

Weren’t able to tune in to our live stream? Watch the video below to catch all of the day’s talks by various members of the Arduino team.

Most importantly, we would like to express a heartfelt thanks to our extremely passionate and awesome community. It was YOU who made Arduino Day a huge and successful celebration we will never forget.

 

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As Arduino Day quickly approaches, we are blown away by the tremendous support of the Arduino community with more than 480 events from all around the world.

Arduino Day Turin will feature talks by Massimo Banzi, Federico Musto, and other Arduino members, which will be streamed live on the Arduino Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels. The streaming will begin at 3pm CET. A final program of presentations will be posted as soon as possible at this linkStarting at 11am CET at Toolbox Turin, the agenda will include: two workshops for children in collaboration with Fablab for Kids (registration here and here), a basic and an advanced workshop for adults in coordination with the Casa Jasmina crew (registration here and here), as well as a young Maker activity corner supported by Codemotion Kids. Everything will be free of charge.

Arduino Day Malmö festivities (full program here) will consist of an Arduino project showcase, a panel of discussions with David Cuartielles and local Makers, in addition to a pair of free activities for kids (registration is not necessary). Starting at 5pm, there will also be a live streaming of the talks from Arduino Day Turin.

Last but not least, the Arduino team will be hosting a third official event in San Jose, CA (register here). The program will kick off with a demonstration of Arduino projects, followed by a live video exchange with Arduino Day Toronto. This is a great opportunity for Arduino enthusiasts in America to socialize with one another, exhibit their latest creations, and even learn more about Arduino in the classroom. Everyone is welcome to attend!

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We cannot wait to celebrate with our community this Saturday! Until then, continue sharing your plans and inviting your friends to join Arduino Day via social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD17.



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