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Arduino Day is now less than three weeks away, and we cannot wait to celebrate with everyone on April 1st. So far, we’ve received hundreds of submission from all across the world and are constantly updating our map with new events — which by the way, if yours has been approved, do not forget to add the agenda!

As we prepare for Arduino Day, we’ve got three more announcements to share:  

  • NEW DEADLINE: The call for submissions has been extended until March 18th! Remember, participation is open to everyone and anyone can organize event of their own Submit yours here!
  • OFFICIAL ARDUINO DAY IN MALMÖ: Aside from our festivities in Turin, the Arduino team will host another official event in Malmö. The program will include a showcase of Maker projects, free activities for kids, and a lineup of talks. Live in Sweden or nearby? Join us!
  • ONLINE EVENTS: Not only will the Arduino community come together at various physical locations throughout the globe, but now several celebrations this year will also be taking place virtually. If you want to host an online event — such as a hangout or a live streamed workshop (we are very open!) — please contact arduinoday2017@arduino.cc with your idea, and we’ll get back to you!

Last but not least, be sure to post and invite your friends via social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD17

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As recently announced, Arduino Day 2017 will be celebrated on April 1st. (If you want to organize an event of your own, please submit your proposal by March 11th.) Though festivities will be taking place worldwide, the Arduino team will be holding this year’s official event at Toolbox Coworking in Turin–which happens to be in the same building as Arduino’s new Italian headquarters.

The Arduino Day Turin program (11am – 6pm), organized in collaboration with Fablab Torino, will include an exhibition area with boards and projects, a talk area with speeches by Massimo Banzi and other Arduino co-founders, a workshop/demo area with free activities for kids–with the Fablab for Kids team–and adults, as well as an Arduino store with special prices and offers.

We are currently seeking projects for Arduino Day Turin’s exhibition space: if you are an individual or team of Makers and would like to show off  your creations, feel free to fill out this form by March 18th. If you are an Arduino enthusiast and want to help out, we are also looking for volunteers (application here) to welcome guests, document the event, and assist the Arduino crew.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing more news and updates on Arduino Day Turin’s agenda and activities. In the meantime, don’t forget to post and invite your friends via ia social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD17! 

For the fourth year, we invite the open source community to join us in celebrating Arduino’s birthday on Saturday, April 1st!

Arduino Day is a 24-hour-long worldwide event – organized by our team and the community – where people interested in Arduino can get together, share their experiences, and learn more about the platform through all sorts of activities, tailored to local audiences. Participation is open to anyone, from young Makers and students to professional engineers and designers.

More than 330 were held by Arduino enthusiasts across the globe in 2016. This year, we are hoping to make that number 500! If you want to organize Arduino Day festivities of your own, please fill out the online form and submit your proposal here by March 11th.

In the coming weeks, be sure to visit the official website to learn more or find an event in your area. And don’t forget to post, engage, and follow along on social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD17!

Congratulations to Geoff Seawright for the following photo showing a cute dog getting angry with four-legged Arduino spider. He’s the last winner of our MKR1000 giveaway, which kicked off back on Arduino Day! Thanks to all the participants sharing their pics and mentioning our new official Arduino Instagram account!

Dog getting angry with 4-legged arduino spider…possibly it will replace him #arduinoD16 @Arduino.cc

A photo posted by Geoff Seawright (@geoffseawright) on

 

We’re excited to announce the winner of this week’s Instagram giveaway, who will be receiving an Arduino MKR1000 and an Arduino t-shirt for sharing this #ArduinoD16 picture. With Maker Faire Bay Area quickly approaching, it is only fitting to have a winner from San Francisco — congratulations to Amped Atelier!

We spent #arduinod16 #genuinod16 as part of a technology fashion show showcasing our mimic dresses powered by @arduino.cc

A photo posted by Amped Atelier (@amped_atelier) on

Think your pic is a winner? You have one more week to submit it:

– Follow our official Arduino.cc account on Instagram

– Share your photos on your account on Instagram using the hashtag #ArduinoD16 and #GenuinoD16, and be sure to mention us at @arduino.cc

– Every Thursday, from April 7th to May 26th, we are going to choose one of your images (posted starting April 2nd) and announce the winner of an Arduino or a Genuino MKR1000, and one of our t-shirts or mugs, right here on the blog. :) That’s a total of of eight lucky people! Easy enough, right?

Back at Arduino Day 2016, Massimo Banzi explored the true meaning of the Internet of Things in a more philosophical, approachable way. During his presentation, the Arduino co-founder touched upon the current state of the industry, some guiding principles, as well as what the future may entail.

“A lot of people are trying to build products that are connected, but not a lot of stuff makes a lot of sense right now. There’s a lot of strange stuff happening. It’s the beginning of an industry,” Banzi explained. “There’s a couple of misconceptions. A lot of people tend to equate the Internet of Things with smart thermostats for your home, and it’s much more than that. The part of the IoT that right now is impacting and can impact your life the most is the least sexy one.”

You can watch the entire talk below:

Jerome Calvo, who took this sweet pic during Arduino Day in Berkeley, is this week’s winner of our Instagram giveaway. He’ll be taking home an Arduino MKR1000 and an Arduino t-shirt!

Starting at a young age with @arduino.cc #arduinod16 #genuinod16

A photo posted by Jerome Calvo (@caljer) on

There’s still a few weeks left to share your pics for a chance to win. Here’s how:

– Follow our official Arduino.cc account on Instagram

– Share your images on your account on Instagram using hashtag #ArduinoD16 and #GenuinoD16 and mention us with the tag @Arduino.cc

– Every Thursday, from April 7th to May 26th, we are going to choose one of your pics (posted starting April 2nd) and announce the winner of an Arduino or a Genuino MKR1000 and one of our t-shirt or mug :) on the blog. That’s a total of of eight lucky people! Easy enough, right?

Congratulations to Gustavo Reynaga from Sinaloa (Mexico) for the following picture taken at Genuino Day at Mazatlan International Center. We’re sending him a Genuino MKR1000 and a Genuino Mug!

First Arduino/Genuino Day in Sinaloa State of Mexico @arduino.cc @arduino.cc #ArduinoD16 #GenuinoD16

A photo posted by Gustavo Reynaga (@hulkco) on


It’s your time to win a MKR1000 too!

– Follow our official Arduino.cc account on Instagram

– Share your pics on your account on Instagram using hashtag #ArduinoD16 and #GenuinoD16 and mention us with the tag @Arduino.cc

– Every thursday, from April 7th to May 26th we are going to choose one of your pics (posted starting April 2nd) and announce on this blog a winner of an Arduino or a Genuino MKR1000 and one of our t-shirt or mug :) for a total of of 8 lucky people. Easy enough, right?

Remember to share cool pictures regarding Arduino and Genuino moments in your community also beyond Arduino and Genuino Day.
Show us your local activities!

mellis-aday

At Arduino Day, I talked about a project I and my collaborators have been working on to bring machine learning to the maker community. Machine learning is a technique for teaching software to recognize patterns using data, e.g. for recognizing spam emails or recommending related products. Our ESP (Example-based Sensor Predictions) software recognizes patterns in real-time sensor data, like gestures made with an accelerometer or sounds recorded by a microphone. The machine learning algorithms that power this pattern recognition are specified in Arduino-like code, while the recording and tuning of example sensor data is done in an interactive graphical interface. We’re working on building up a library of code examples for different applications so that Arduino users can easily apply machine learning to a broad range of problems.

The project is a part of my research at the University of California, Berkeley and is being done in collaboration with Ben Zhang, Audrey Leung, and my advisor Björn Hartmann. We’re building on the Gesture Recognition Toolkit (GRT) and openFrameworks. The software is still rough (and Mac only for now) but we’d welcome your feedback. Installations instructions are on our GitHub project page. Please report issues on GitHub.

Our project is part of a broader wave of projects aimed at helping electronics hobbyists make more sophisticated use of sensors in their interactive projects. Also building on the GRT is ml-lib, a machine learning toolkit for Max and Pure Data. Another project in a similar vein is the Wekinator, which is featured in a free online course on machine learning for musicians and artists. Rebecca Fiebrink, the creator of Wekinator, recently participated in a panel on machine learning in the arts and taught a workshop (with Phoenix Perry) at Resonate ’16. For non-real time applications, many people use scikit-learn, a set of Python tools. There’s also a wide range of related research from the academic community, which we survey on our project wiki.

For a high-level overview, check out this visual introduction to machine learning. For a thorough introduction, there are courses on machine learning from coursera and from udacity, among others. If you’re interested in a more arts- and design-focused approach, check out alt-AI, happening in NYC next month.

If you’d like to start experimenting with machine learning and sensors, an excellent place to get started is the built-in accelerometer and gyroscope on the Arduino or Genuino 101. With our ESP system, you can use these sensors to detect gestures and incorporate them into your interactive projects!

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April 2nd was a great day. We spent it celebrating Arduino and Genuino Day in more than 330 local communities and we had lots of fun!

Our social channels were full of mentions from pics and messages about the events and all the activities you organized or took part to worldwide. That’s why we want to keep celebrating and have some of you win goodies.

Now we are launching a giveaway on Instagram and you’re invited to participate!  How does it work?

– Follow our official Arduino.cc account on Instagram

– Share your pics on your account on Instagram using hashtag #ArduinoD16 and #GenuinoD16 and mention us with the tag @Arduino.cc

– Every thursday, from April 7th to May 26th we are going to choose one of your pics (posted starting April 2nd) and announce on this blog a winner of an Arduino or a Genuino MKR1000 and one of our t-shirt or mug :) for a total of of 8 lucky people. Easy enough, right?

Remember to share cool pictures regarding Arduino and Genuino cool moments in your community beyond Arduino and Genuino Day!
We’re looking forward to see your pics!
mkr1000ISO



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