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Archive for the ‘crowdfunding’ Category

Kickstarter and its ilk seem like the Wild West when it comes to claims of being “The world’s most (Insert feature here) device!” It does add something special when you can truly say you have the world record for a device though, and [MellBell Electronics] are currently running a Kickstarter claiming the worlds smallest Arduino compatible board called Pico.

We don’t want to knock them too much, they seem like a legit Kickstarter campaign who have at time of writing doubled their goal, but after watching their promo video, checking out their Kickstarter, and around a couple of minutes research, their claim of being the world’s smallest Arduino-compatible board seems to have been debunked. The Pico measures in at an impressive 0.6 in. x 0.6 in. with a total area of 0.36 sq.in. which is nothing to be sniffed at, but the Nanite 85 which we wrote up back in 2014 measures up at around 0.4 in. x  0.7in. with a total area of around 0.28 sq.in.. In this post-fact, fake news world we live in, does it really matter? Are we splitting hairs? Or are the Pico team a little fast and loose with facts and the truth?

There may be smaller Arduino compatible boards out there, and this is just a case study between these two. We think when it comes to making bold claims like “worlds smallest” or something similar perhaps performing a simple Google search just to be sure may be an idea.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Crowd Funding

Four creators fixed an Arduino powered LED binary clock inside a wooden model of a Parisian building to create a fancy addition to any home.

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The post This Model Parisian Building Is Actually a Binary Clock appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

This Week in Making saw the reveal of the Two Bit Circus Foundation, hand-made Dark Souls rings, some new crowd funding campaigns, and more.

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The post This Week in Making: ChickTech Meetup, Dark Souls Props, and Robotic Arms appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

talos-rendering-labeled_png_project-bodyA fully open source, Arduino-compatible microcontoller based on the RISC-V architecture.

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The post The Open-V, World’s First RISC-V-based Open Source Microcontroller appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

The Raspberry Pi was made to be inexpensive with an eye toward putting them into schools. But what about programs targeted at teaching embedded programming? There are plenty of fiscally-starved schools all over the world, and it isn’t uncommon for teachers to buy supplies out of their own pockets. What could you do with a board that cost just one dollar?

That’s the idea behind the team promoting the “One Dollar Board” (we don’t know why they didn’t call it a buck board). The idea is to produce a Creative Commons design for a simple microcontroller board that only costs a dollar. You can see a video about the project, below.

Despite being licensed under Creative Commons, there isn’t much detail available that we could find. It appears the board uses an 8 pin Atmel CPU (and the FAQ indicates that the board will use the Arduino IDE). We’re guessing that it’s essentially a Digispark / Adafruit Trinket / ATtiny85 with V-USB installed.

The crowdfunding campaign page lists the following details:

  • CPU: 8-bit
  • GPIO (input and output ports): 6
  • USB Interface: Yes
  • Memory: Flash 8 kBytes (expandable to 256 kBytes)
  • Spaces for expansions: WiFi ESP8266, Memory 24C256, H bridge L293
  • Voltage: 5V
  • Indicator LEDs: 2
  • Reset Button: Yes
  • Fitting Spaces: 4 (compatible with Arduíno UNO or similar)
  • Quick Guide: The English board comes with a printed guide in other languages.

If it is an ATTtiny85-based design, two of those “GPIO” pins will be eaten up by the USB programmer, and maybe two more by the indicator LEDs. And some of that 8 kB of flash is consumed by the bootloader. In short, it’s not going to be able to do everything all at once. Still, it could be just the thing for getting your feet wet.

But the real story is the price. The dollar price tag doesn’t include shipping or taxes, of course, but even getting the price down that low is impressive. Time will tell if the market has an appetite for a dollar board. If we had to guess, the real value will be in ready-made course material.

There are plenty of educational boards out there, but few (if any) cost a buck.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, ATtiny Hacks, Crowd Funding

The new XLR8 board.The XLR8 is an FPGA based board that looks and feels like an Arduino Uno. But not all is what it seems on the surface.

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The post XLR8 Project Blends FPGA Speed with Arduino Coding appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Ago
05

LightBlue Bean+ adds Battery, Connectors, Price

arduino hacks, Bean, BTLE, Crowd Funding, crowdfunding, kickstarter, LightBlue Bean, wireless hacks Commenti disabilitati su LightBlue Bean+ adds Battery, Connectors, Price 

PunchThrough, creators of the LightBlue Bean, have just launch a Kickstarter for a new version called LightBlue Bean+. The tagline for the hardware is “A Bluetooth Arduino for the Mobile Age” which confirms that the hardware is targeted at a no-hassle, get it connected right now sort of application.

lightblue-bean-plus-thumbFor those unfamiliar, the original LightBlue Bean is a single board offering meant to marry Bluetooth connectivity (think Cellphones with BTLE) to the capabilities of a microcontroller-based hardware interface. The Bean+ augments this hardware with a 300m+ range increase, an integrated LiPo (600mAh or more), and headers/connectors where there were only solder pads before.

On the software side of things the Bean+ has four firmware options that make it speak MIDI, ANCS, HID, or Peer-to-Peer, only not all at the same time. The good news is that these are ecosystem upgrades and will work for existing Bean hardware too. The entire thing comes with online-platform integration and easy to use Smartphone tools to guide you through connecting and making something useful.

The board includes a battery tending circuit that allows it to be charged via the USB port but can run over a year between recharges if you use it judiciously. There is a slider switch near the pin sockets marked “A3, A4, A5″ which toggles between 3.3v and 5v so that no level shifters are needed for sensors and other hardware you might use with it. The white connectors seen near the bottom of this image are Grove connectors. These provide I2C and Analog support to that ecosystem of add-on boards.

All in all this is a pretty sweet upgrade. The MSRP will be $45 but early backers can get in around 10-25% less than that. The price doesn’t mean it’s a no-brainer to pick one up, but the header options make this much more versatile and reusable than the original Bean and we like the idea of a rechargeable battery of the coin cells used by Bean+’s predecessor. It is an each choice for drop-in no hassle connectivity when bottom line isn’t your top concern.

Original LightBlue Bean is available in the Hackaday Store.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Crowd Funding, wireless hacks
Ago
05

First Look: Bean+ Microcontroller Adds Greater Range, Better Battery, and More

arduino, Bean, BLE, bluetooth, Bluetooth LE, crowdfunding, kickstarter, Light Blue Bean, Punch Through Design Commenti disabilitati su First Look: Bean+ Microcontroller Adds Greater Range, Better Battery, and More 

BeanFamilyToday Punch Through Design launched a Kickstarter campaign for their new Bluetooth LE Arduino-compatible microcontroller board the Bean+.

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The post First Look: Bean+ Microcontroller Adds Greater Range, Better Battery, and More appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Feb
25

Cellular Connectivity Comes to Microcontrollers With The Spark Electron

arduino, crowdfunding, Electronics Commenti disabilitati su Cellular Connectivity Comes to Microcontrollers With The Spark Electron 

The new Spark ElectronMeet Electron from Spark, the new board that puts GSM cellular connectivity directly on the microcontroller. With its onboard cellular antenna, this diminutive board will offer a huge range of deployment options and alleviate the hassle of using a custom cellular breakout board with your micro controller projects. They’re offering two […]

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Feb
13

Tindie Biz is Yelp For Manufacturing

arduino, crowdfunding, Maker Pro, Raspberry Pi, tindie, yelp Commenti disabilitati su Tindie Biz is Yelp For Manufacturing 

tindieMaker marketplace Tindie, an online store where Makers can buy and sell homemade gadgets, launched a beta service called Tindie Biz this week for finding and reviewing suppliers and manufacturers. “We hear stories of makers paying $20k for introductions to manufacturers or a startup losing $100k to middlemen that never produce,” […]

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