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Archive for the ‘lamp’ Category

Clara

Clara is a smart lamp able to respond to your brain waves and subtly adjust your environment. The project, running on Arduino Uno, was created by  Marcelo Mejía Cobo, Belen Tenorio, and Josh Sucher for a class at the School of Visual Arts in NYC (US).

clara02

The team worked with the Neurosky MindWave Mobile, a Bluetooth EEG-reading headset in order to wirelessly detect “attention” and map the lamp’s color temperature and speaker volume accordingly:

At first, the lamp emits a warm, comforting glow, conducive to idea generation and creativity. But as you start homing in on a specific idea, the light becomes crisper and cooler, and the volume of the ambient noise flowing from the embedded speaker slowly increases, enhancing your ability to concentrate and block out external distractions.

In the picture below you can see the inside of the lamp with the Arduino Uno and Adafruit Music Maker shield:
clara-inside

Explore the Arduino Sketch on Github.

[Connor] was working on a project for his college manufacturing class when he came up with the idea for this sleek desk lamp. As a college student, he’s not fond of having his papers glowing brightly in front of him at night. This lamp takes care of the problem by adjusting the color temperature based on the position of the sun. It also contains a capacities touch sensor to adjust the brightness without the need for buttons with moving parts.

The base is made from two sheets of aluminum and a bar of aluminum. These were cut and milled to the final shape. [Connor] found a nice DC barrel jack from Jameco that fits nicely with this design. The head of the lamp was made from another piece of aluminum bar stock. All of the aluminum pieces are held together with brass screws.

A slot was milled out of the bottom of the head-piece to make room for an LED strip and a piece of 1/8″ acrylic. This piece of acrylic acts as a light diffuser.  Another piece of acrylic was cut and added to the bottom of the base of the lamp. This makes for a nice glowing outline around the bottom that gives it an almost futuristic look.

The capacitive touch sensor is a pretty simple circuit. [Connor] used the Arduino capacitive touch sensor library to make his life a bit easier. The electronic circuit really only requires a single resistor between two Arduino pins. One of the pins is also attached to the aluminum body of the lamp. Now simply touching the lamp body allows [Connor] to adjust the brightness of the lamp.

[Connor] ended up using an Electric Imp to track the sun. The Imp uses the wunderground API to connect to the weather site and track the sun’s location. In the earlier parts of the day, the LED colors are cooler and have more blues. In the evening when the sun is setting or has already set, the lights turn more red and warm. This is easier on the eyes when you are hunched over your desk studying for your next exam. The end result is not only functional, but also looks like something you might find at that fancy gadget store in your local shopping mall.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Ott
09

GPS lamps and the (in)visible landscape of the networked city

arduino, arduino uno, Featured, gps, lamp, Lamp(s), oslo Commenti disabilitati su GPS lamps and the (in)visible landscape of the networked city 

gps-lamps2

Satellite Lamps is a project investigating one of the most important contemporary infrastructures, the Global Positioning System or GPS. It’s a project curated by Einar Sneve Martinussen, Jørn Knutsen and Timo Arnall as part of the Yourban research project at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design and continues their previous work on revealing the materials of technologies that started in 2009 with RFID and Immaterials: Light Painting Wifi. The project uses Arduino extensively, and is also thoroughly documented:

GPS is widely used yet it’s invisible and few of us really have any idea of how it works or how it inhabits our everyday environments. We created a series of Lamps that change brightness according to the accuracy of received GPS signals, and when we photograph them as timelapse films, we start to get a picture of how these signals behave in actual urban spaces.

 

They published a film that you can watch above, and published an article that details very thoroughly how it was made and why. If you are interested in the project, you can read more on how they explored GPS , how the visualisations were made, and about the cultural history of GPS.

gps-lamps

This is a GPS receiver connected to Arduino that sends data to a piece of software running on a laptop. It is a quickly designed tool, a transparent plastic box that that allows us to observe the performance of the electronics, and still mobile enough to carry in hand or a backpack.

Ott
03

Tinkernut’s Lamp Comes To Life Using Ultrasonic Waves

arduino, Electronics, General, lamp, Sonar Commenti disabilitati su Tinkernut’s Lamp Comes To Life Using Ultrasonic Waves 

Tinkernut’s Motion Controlled Ultrasonic Lamp takes uses sound to detect motionThe Motion Controlled Ultrasonic Lamp is great for beginners starting out with the Arduino Uno. It may or may not detect ninjas but will illuminate and follow most everyone else.

Read more on MAKE

Set
15

The internet of trees makes smart birdhouses using Arduino Yún

arduino, Arduino Yún, bird, Featured, inspiration, iot, lamp, Lamp(s), nest, Yun Commenti disabilitati su The internet of trees makes smart birdhouses using Arduino Yún 

tumblr_inline_nbjvwkqaDW1rxqn91

The connected birdhouse is a project prototyped during a workshop ran by Massimo Banzi at Boisbuchet, last August in France. It was developed using Arduino Yún, by Valentina Chinnici, who shared with us the project, and two other students taking part to  the week of learning-by-doing around the theme of  the Internet of Trees.

They redesigned a traditional object, a wooden birdhouse to be placed outdoor, and connected it to a lamp shaped like a nest, to be placed indoor:

The connected birdhouse was in fact an interactive object able to communicate to the nest/lamp the presence of a bird inside the house, and accordingly to a color coded signal was giving also some informations about the size of the bird itself. In the event of a bird entering into the house, the nest/lamp remotely controlled via WiFi by an Arduino Yún, was turned on. The nest/lamp received the notification from the birdhouse translating it firstly with a rainbow effect. After few seconds the light changed according to the weight of the bird (green, yellow or red).

The LED strip used for the nest lamp was an Adafruit Neopixel strip controlled by an Arduino Yún.

On this blog you can find the sketch to make it work and create one yourself.

Giu
12

An origami night light

3DPrinting, arduino, arduino mega, lamp, mega Commenti disabilitati su An origami night light 

elephant01

Trent Brook is a designer based in Sydney who created an elefant-shaped night lamp for his daughter Harpa (1 and a half years old). It has evolved from a small paper origami elephant with blinking LEDs, to a large 3-d printed elephant lamp shade with Wifi controlled RGB LEDs, microphone, speaker, and a custom designed iPad application to teach her about colour:

The electronics are driven by an Arduino MEGA 2560 microcontroller with ethernet shield for network control. Connected to the board is a 50cm 5V RGB addressable LED strip with 30 LEDs, a 3.3V microphone module for sound detection, and an 8ohm speaker for playing back generated ‘white-noise’ audio. Total cost for the all the electronics was less than $100.

elephant02

Check the details of this cute project on his page on Behance.

 

Giu
04

Wood and electronics in a kinetic steampunk-flavored sculpture

arduino, arduino mega, lamp, lasercut, mega Commenti disabilitati su Wood and electronics in a kinetic steampunk-flavored sculpture 

orbis01

Orbis is a kinetic & lighting  lasercut sculpture controlled by Arduino Mega and created by an engineering design service located in Long Island NY which submitted it to our blog:

Orbis has several unique features and modes of operation not usually seen in Kinetic Art work. There are six specialized lighting modes and two motion modes which are all controlled via two independent Arduino Atmega 2560 control boards.
Orbis was created for a client’s new home who wanted something truly unique. The client specifically requested something which blends the classic look of wood with electronics and mechanics in a simple artistic manner.

It also had to be large enough to highlight a central wall in the home while combining elements of old and new technologies. The client also wanted a separate control box which would allow guests to his home the ability to interact with the Kinetic Sculpture.
In order to create such a unique Kinetic Sculpture and control box, custom 3D models were developed. Once the client approved, these same files were sent out to a laser wood cutting service. Each piece was then hand stained and carefully assembled.

 


In the picture below you can see the inside of the control box:

orbis-inside

 

More pictures and videos on the project’s website.

Apr
15

The most advanced Lamp/Speaker is open source and also Arduino at heart

arduino, ArduinoAtHeart, crowdfunding, lamp, Open source hardware, speaker Commenti disabilitati su The most advanced Lamp/Speaker is open source and also Arduino at heart 

cromatica digital habits

Interacting with objects in a new way has always been the main focus of Digital Habits, a design studio based in Milan.  Today we are proud to announce they’ve become a partner  of the Arduino At Heart program with their new project called Cromatica (it was exhibited at the coveted Fuorisalone Milan Design Week in the Superstudio Temporary Museum for New Design and started the crowdfunding campaign just some days ago!).

Cromatica is half speaker and half desk lamp: it can be controlled through a natural gestural interface, touch sensors or remotely via the Cromatica Android and iOS app. Designed to deliver both light and sound functions, Cromatica features wireless 4.0 Bluetooth connection for streaming music and a RGB lamp for multiple ambient effects.

Cromatica is embedded with an Arduino allowing for a highly digital, multi-sensory music and desktop working experience.  It blends  light and sound functionalities in unexpected ways, taking IoT products to a new level of quality.  For example you can download the app for natural awakening: light will rise and music streaming will start allowing you to wake up to your favourite playlist, perfect for early mornings.

Take a look at the video for the Natural Interaction:

In the video below you can see how you can create your favorite ambient  to match with your mood:

Innocenzo Rifino, Director of Digital Habits, told us:

“The Cromatica is a multi-purpose light-speaker but it is also our vision of the evolution of electronics, a vision that is moving in a more human and open direction. Crowdrooster have helped tremendously by opening our product up to a wider community whilst giving us the chance to generate enough funding to share our concepts more widely.”

The Cromatica is also true to its maker roots being Open Source and hackable, opening the doors for endless innovation from the maker community as it can be adapted to integrate with other tech and the Internet of Things. To enable this there will be a special ‘Maker Edition’ campaign reward complete with digital file to 3D print the shell.

Take a look at their campaign Crowdrooster and make your pledge!
Crowdrooster, the new ‘all tech’ crowdfunding site, introduced Cromatica as the first maker project available for funding on the site.

Nov
29

RFID RGB Lamp Goes the Distance

arduino hacks, bandsaw, lamp, led hacks, led strip, mosfet, RGB, Woodworking Commenti disabilitati su RFID RGB Lamp Goes the Distance 

rfid-RGB-lamp

[Philippe Chrétien's] project makes it to our front page just based on its completeness. When you hear about a multicolored lamp which changes based on an RFID tag you might not get too excited. When you look at the refined electronics and the quality of the wooden enclosure it’s another story entirely.

As we’ve said many times before, coming up with the idea for a project is the hardest part… especially when you just want to start hacking. With his kids in mind [Philippe] figured this would be something fun for them to play around with, opening the door to discussing the electronics concepts behind it.

He prototyped on a breadboard using three N-type MOSFETs to drive the colors of an RGB LED strip. The proven circuit was laid out and etched at home to arrive at the clean-looking Arduino shield shown off above. The entire thing gets a custom enclosure cut using layered plywood, a paper template, and a bandsaw.

Need a use for this once the novelty has worn off? Why not mod it to use as a motion activated night light? Alas the actual project link for that one is dead, but you get the idea.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, led hacks
Set
13

Making a Gmail Lamp with Arduino Yún

arduino, Arduino Yún, gmail, Hardware, lamp, Yun Commenti disabilitati su Making a Gmail Lamp with Arduino Yún 

Arduino Yún

I am delighted to welcome Stefano Guglielmetti who, together with other Arduino friends/supporters, accepted to start experimenting with  Arduino Yun and write a blog post to present some hands-on results. Starting today we are going to host a series of guest bloggers exploring different unique features of our new board.

Stefano, has more than 16 years of experience in the Internet industry, working both with small companies and start-ups up to very big and complex environments. His post below was orginally published at this link.

————-

Finally!!! Finally I put my hands on a brand new  Arduino Yún. I’ve been waiting for this a long, loooong time. I’ve been playing with Arduino since the “diecimila” model came out and I, as a lot of people, always suffered the lack of connectivity and of real computing power. I tried to solve some of these problems using RaspberryPi and/or Electric Imp, but I always missed the Arduino approach… easy, lots of shields and Arduino ready parts, a lot of documentation, a strong community and the freedom of Open Source.

Now one of my dreams came true, and every time I go deeper into the discovery of the Yún’s capabilities, I find something amazing, very smart and very well done.

I won’t describe the platform itself, as many articles talking about that are already published and there will be many more to come. I’ll start directly with a real life example, in just a few hours I finally built something really, really useful to me, something I already built several times in various ways but none of which really satisfied me.

The task is pretty simple, and I believe it will be very useful to many people: I need to be alerted in real time when I receive some important emails. Not all the emails: we provide customer care for many clients, with different SLAs, and I need to be alerted only for the most important ones. Moreover, sometimes I look forward to receiving a precise email… a shipment confirmation, a mail from a special someone… I need something flexible, eye catching, that doesn’t depend on my computer or my cellphone (that always has only 1% battery)

So I decided to build a GMail Lamp and Arduino Yún was the perfect choice (and now that I built it, I can confirm that. It is perfect)

The working principle is very straightforward: On GMail, I defined a new label, so I can quickly change the rules for the messages that will go under it, then I tell to Arduino Yún which label to watch for (via REST APIs… amazing) and that’s it! The lamp (actually only just a led, the lamp will come in the future) turns on every time I get new messages under that label. It’s the bat-signal principle! :)

LED Display with Arduino Yún

Okay, now let’s get a bit more technical… how did I do it?

The hardware

  • An Arduino Yún, and it must be connected to the internet.
  •  A LED (or a relay if you want to turn on a real lamp, as I will do in the future)

This is the connection scheme (supersimple)

The LED goes on Digital Pin 13
The LED Display uses pins 10,11,12 and, obviously, GND and +5V

Schematic -  Arduino Yún

Ok, the hardware is ready. When you will program the Yún for the first time, even if you can program it over the wifi network, I suggest you use the serial port via USB because it’s faster and I still use the serial port to debug (even if you have a brand new Console object :) . But it’s just a personal choice.

Now, the Code

Even if it’s short, I think it’s very interesting because I used many new features of the Yún. I’m not going to describe all the code, that you can freely download or fork from GitHub (https://github.com/amicojeko/Arduino-Yun-Gmail-Check). I’ll try to describe only the parts that involve brand new code and that are peculiar of the Yún

Let’s start from the beginning

#include <Process.h>

With the Process library, you can run some code on the Linux side of the Yún and catch the stdout on Arduino. It’s amazing because you can delegate to Linux all the dirty jobs and the heavy computing. In this case, I use the Linux “curl” command to get the ATOM feed of my label from GMail.

The Process library also includes the Bridge library, that allows you to pass information between the two sides of the Yún (Linux and Arduino) using a key/value pairing. And it gives you the power of REST APIs, I use it to configure the label to observe.

#include <FileIO.h>

With this library, you can use the inernal memory or a micro SD card/USB key for storage. All these features are native on the Yún!

#include "LedControl.h"  
/* Downloaded From http://playground.arduino.cc/Main/LedControl */

I use this library to control the 7 segment LED Display

const int ledPin = 13;

I’ve used the pin 13 for the led. As I told you before, you can replace the LED with a relay in order to turn on and off a real lamp!

const char* settings_file = "/root/gmail_settings\0"; 
/* This is the settings file */

I’m saving under “/root” cause /tmp and /var will be erased at every reboot.

Bridge.get("label", labelbuffer, 256);

This is a supercool line of code that uses an übercool Yún’s feature. I’m telling Arduino to listen for a REST call on the URL http://arduino.local/data/put/label/LABEL

When I get some data, it will put the value of LABEL in the localbuffer. The localbuffer was initialized like that

char labelbuffer[256];

That means that you can actually talk with your Arduino while it runs projects! You can get or put variables, you can finally make dynamic projects! I used it to tell Arduino which label to observe, but I can, and I will go further, I promise.

label = String(labelbuffer);
File settings = FileSystem.open(settings_file, FILE_WRITE);
settings.print(label);
settings.close();

This is cool too. Using the FileIO object, I save the label in a local file on the Linux side of Arduino, so when I will turn it off and on again, It will remember my settings.

File settings = FileSystem.open(settings_file, FILE_READ);
while (settings.available() > 0){
  char c = settings.read();
  label += c;
}
settings.close();

This is how I read a file from the filesystem.

Process p;

p.runShellCommand("curl -u " + username + ":" + password + " 
\"https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom/" + label + "\" -k --silent |grep -o \"
<fullcount>[0-9]*</fullcount>\" |grep -o \"[0-9]*\"");

while(p.running()); // do nothing until the process finishes, so you get the whole output
int result = p.parseInt();

This is another bit of Yún’s magic. I run the curl command to get the ATOM feed of a specific label, and then I parse it with the grep command, and finally I get the number of unread messages for that label. Even if on the Yún’s Linux stack there are both Python and Lua, I thought that this solution was the most simple and stupid, and I love to KISS.

That’s it, now i just have to turn the LED on and to display the number of unread messages on the LED Display…

In a single day I learned how to use the Bridge library to get data from REST webservices, how to save and load data from the Linux filesystem, and how to run processes on the Linux side and get the STDOUT results. I already knew how to use the LED Display but I hope that someone learned something new even about that :)

Now I will build the actual lamp, improving both the Hardware and the Software sides, I will make it gorgeous and fully configurable, and I will keep you informed about that!
Cheers to everybody and happy hacking!

——

Text and pictures by Stefano Guglielmetti

 



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