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Since its launch in 2013, the Yùn–a small Linux machine and a microcontroller in a small Arduino form factor–found its way into hundreds of thousands of projects and professional applications. Last year, we decided that it was time for a refresh and began working hard to develop a true open-source design, with more compelling features and better overall software support.

The new board, which is expected to hit the market in the second half of April, will include enhanced functionality and compatibility with its predecessor.

Why a New Yùn

The Yùn enjoyed tremendous success; however, it ended up being affected by the internal issues we dealt with over the past couple of years and support has been quite intermittent.

For example, the board was never really an open-source product and the software had some challenges that we wanted to fix, especially from a security point of view.

What’s New in Rev.2

Hardware:  

  • Much better, more robust power supply
  • New Ethernet connector with a clever mounting solution that enables the use of all possible shields with no risk for accidental short circuits
  • Horizontal USB connector to save vertical space
  • Improved USB hub

Software: 

  • Software stack updated to OpenWRT latest version, including all patches
  • SSL support on the bridge Arduino / Linux bridge

Yùn Rev.2 is scheduled to begin shipping in April. Until then, you can stay up-to-date by clicking “NOTIFY ME” on our store

Today, at Embedded Linux Conference 2018, Arduino announced the expansion of the number of architectures supported by its Arduino Create platform for the development of IoT applications. With this new release, Arduino Create users can manage and program a wide range of popular Linux® single-board computers like the AAEON® UP² board, Raspberry Pi® and BeagleBone® as if they were regular Arduino boards. Multiple Arduino programs can run simultaneously on a Linux-based board and interact and communicate with each other, leveraging the capabilities provided by the new Arduino Connector. Moreover, IoT devices can be managed and updated remotely, independently from where they are located.

To further simplify the user journey, Arduino has also developed a novel out-of-the-box experience for Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone boards, in addition to Intel®  SBCs, which enables anyone to set up a new device from scratch via the cloud without any previous knowledge by following an intuitive web-based wizard. Arduino plans to continue enriching and expanding the set of features of Arduino Create in the coming months.

“With this release, Arduino extends its reach into edge computing, enabling anybody with Arduino programming experience to manage and develop complex multi-architecture IoT applications on gateways,” said Massimo Banzi, Arduino CTO. “This is an important step forward in democratizing access to the professional Internet of Things.”

“At Arduino we want to empower anyone to be an active player in the digital world. Being able to run Arduino code and manage connected Linux devices is an important step in this direction, especially for IoT applications that need more computing power, like AI and computer vision,” added Fabio Violante, Arduino CEO.

We’re excited to announce a new update to the Arduino Create web platform, which will enable fast and easy development and deployment of IoT applications with integrated cloud services on Linux-based devices.

What this means is that users will be able to program their Linux boards as if they were regular Arduinos. Multiple Arduino programs can run simultaneously on a Linux board and programs can communicate with each other leveraging the capabilities of the new open source Arduino Connector. 

Arduino Create Cloud now allows users to manage individual IoT devices, and configure them remotely and independently from where they are located. To further simplify the user journey, we’ve also developed a novel “out of the box” experience that will let anyone set up a new device from scratch via the cloud without any previous knowledge by following an intuitive web-based wizard

The initial release has been sponsored by Intel® and supports X86/X86_64 boards. As a reference implementation, a simplified user experience has been designed for the AAEON® UP² board, although other platforms are already supported by the Arduino Create Cloud platform, such as the Intel® NUC, Dell Wyse®, Gigabyte™ GB-BXT.

In the coming months, we plan to expand support for Linuxbased IoT devices running on other hardware architectures. Until then, you can find more information here and follow the tutorials below to help get you going:

 

ARMIde

As many of you already noticed, we recently released a new “Linux ARM” version of the Arduino IDE available for download on our website together with the usual “Linux 32bit” and “Linux 64bit.”

This release enables you to run the Arduino Software (IDE) on many of the mini PC boards based on ARM6+ processors currently on the market, including Raspberry Pi, C.H.I.P., BeagleBone, UDOO… just to name a few.

downloadArm

The Linux ARM release has been strongly supported by our community and we would like to thank all the people that helped to make this happen: GitHub handles @CRImier, @NicoHood, @PaulStoffregen, @ShorTie8, and to everyone that patiently tested and reported problems.

If you are interested (and brave!), you can read the full story and explore the complete list of collaborators below:

https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/pull/3549
https://github.com/arduino/arduino-builder/issues/105
https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/pull/4457
https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/pull/4517

Disclaimer: The release is “experimental,” meaning that it mostly works but some boards do not work or may not produce the desired result… enjoy imperfection and give us feedback on Github!

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit organization that sponsors the work of Linus Torvalds. Supporting companies include HP, IBM, Intel, and a host of other large corporations. The foundation hosts several Linux-related projects. This month they announced Zephyr, an RTOS aimed at the Internet of Things.

The project stresses modularity, security, and the smallest possible footprint. Initial support includes:

  • Arduino 101
  • Arduino Due
  • Intel Galileo Gen 2
  • NXP FRDM-K64F Freedom

The project (hosted on its own Website) has downloads for the kernel and documentation. Unlike a “normal” Linux kernel, Zephyr builds the kernel with your code to create a monolithic image that runs in a single shared address space. The build system allows you to select what features you want and exclude those you don’t. You can also customize resource utilization of what you do include, and you define resources at compile time.

By default, there is minimal run-time error checking to keep the executable lean. However, there is an optional error-checking infrastructure you can include for debugging.

The API contains the things you expect from an RTOS like fibers (lightweight non-preemptive threads), tasks (preemptively scheduled), semaphores, mutexes, and plenty of messaging primitives. Also, there are common I/O calls for PWM, UARTs, general I/O, and more. The API is consistent across all platforms.

You can find out more about Zephyr in the video below. We’ve seen RTOS systems before, of course. There’s even some for robots. However, having a Linux-heritage RTOS that can target small boards like an Arduino Due and a Freedom board could be a real game changer for sophisticated projects that need an RTOS.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, ARM, linux hacks, news

An engineering student at the University of Western Macedonia has just added another appliance to the ever-growing list of Internet enabled things. [Panagiotis] decided to modify an off-the-shelf bread maker to enable remote control via the Internet.

[Panagiotis] had to remove pretty much all of the original control circuitry for this device. The original controller was replaced with an Arduino Uno R3 and an Ethernet shield. The temperature sensor also needed to be replaced, since [Panagiotis] could not find any official documentation describing the specifications of the original. Luckily, the heating element and mixer motor were able to be re-used.

A few holes were drilled into the case to make room for the Ethernet connector as well as a USB connector. Two relays were used to allow the Arduino to switch the heating element and mixer motor on and off. The front panel of the bread maker came with a simple LCD screen and a few control buttons. Rather than let those go to waste, they were also wired into the Arduino.

The Arduino bread maker can be controlled via a web site that runs on a separate server. The website is coded with PHP and runs on Apache. It has a simple interface that allows the user to specify several settings including how much bread is being cooked as well as the desired darkness of the bread. The user can then schedule the bread maker to start. Bread Online also comes with an “offline” mode so that it can be used locally without the need for a computer or web browser. Be sure to check out the video demonstration below.

[Thanks Minas]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, cooking hacks
Feb
06

Time to explore Linux on Intel® Galileo Gen 2 – Tutorial

ArduinoCertified, Featured, Galileo, Intel Galileo, Linux Commenti disabilitati su Time to explore Linux on Intel® Galileo Gen 2 – Tutorial 

linux-galileo

The new tutorial we want to present you today is more like a guide giving you some basic information about the benefit of accessing Linux shell in Intel® Galileo Gen 2. It also shows you in which way the Intel® Galileo Gen 2 is not only an advanced, more powerful version of Arduino Uno that happens to be layered on top of a Linux system. There is definitely much more that can be done with it and the Linux shell: this tutorial is an entry point to explore it and learn how to:

– preparing a system image;
– accessing the shell in 4 different ways;
– examining the workflow of copying a python script into Intel® Galileo Gen 2 through scp (or pscp);
– running an Arduino sketch;
-retrieving files from Intel® Galileo Gen 2.

 

The Intel® Galileo Gen 2 includes much of the Arduino Uno’s functionality. Similar to an Uno, it can create a wide variety interactive objects that use input sensors and various outputs. After exploring the many possibilities of using the “Arduino part” of the  Intel® Galileo Gen 2 this way, one might start to wonder: what is the next step?

Perhaps you want to write more complex programs using your favorite scripting language like python or javascript. Maybe you’re interested in computer vision or want to have full control over the board and find out more about the inner workings. By accessing to the Linux core, all these will be possible to achieve.

This tutorial will cover the basics of working with Linux by making a simple program that logs button presses. While the example is not very useful, it will help familiarize you with Linux as applied to the Intel® Galileo Gen 2.

Follow the link and explore all the steps

Ago
07

Add Linux, WiFi, Ethernet and USB to Arduino

arduino, Arduino Yún, ethernet, leonardo, Linux, Mega2560, USB, wifi, Yun Commenti disabilitati su Add Linux, WiFi, Ethernet and USB to Arduino 

YunShield_2-500x358

by Edwin Chen @ open-electronics.org:

The model of this shield named Yun Shield, the feature of this shield is as its name. User can add this shield into Arduino (Leonardo, UNO, MEGA2560 etc) and “turn” the Arduino into device which has similiar features as Arduino Yun: support remote upgrade and use the Bridge library.

With this shield, user can easy to set up communcation between Arduino and Internet (via ethernet , wifi or 3g etc) and add support for USB flash, video. The detail user guide/ manual can be found in the dragino website and most Arduino Yun Sketch / examples can reuse with this Shield. This shield is under production and will be ready within one months time.

Add Linux, WiFi, Ethernet and USB to Arduino - [Link]

Giu
28

Build a Bass Master 3000 Carnival Game

arduino, arduino hacks, carnival, game, instructables, Linux, Yun Commenti disabilitati su Build a Bass Master 3000 Carnival Game 

Bass Master 3000

We’ve all been there. You are having fun walking around the carnival when you suddenly find yourself walking past the carnival games. The people working the booths are taunting you, trying to get you to play their games. You know the truth, though. Those games are rigged. You don’t know how they do it. You just know that they do… somehow.

Now you can put your worries to rest and build your own carnival game! [John] built his own “Bass Master 3000” style carnival game and posted an Instructable so you can make one too.

The game is pretty straightforward. You have a giant fish-shaped target with a wide open mouth. You take hold of a small fishing reel with a rubber ball on the end. Your goal is to cast the ball out and hit the fish in its big mouth. If you hit the mouth, you get to hear a loud buzzer and see some flashing lights. The system also uses a webcam to take a candid photo of the winner. A computer screen shows all of the winners of the day.

The brain of the system is an Arduino Yún. The Yún is similar to an Uno but it also has some extra features. Some good examples are an Ethernet port, a wireless adapter, and an SD card slot. The mouth sensors are just two piezo elements. Each sensor is hooked up to the Arduino through a small trim pot. This allows you to dial in the sensitivity of each sensor. The lights and the buzzer are controlled via a relay, triggered by a 5V digital pin on the Arduino.

The Yún actually has a small on-board Linux computer that you can communicate with from inside the Arduino environment. This allows [John] to use the Yún to actually take photos directly from a web cam, store them on the local SD card, and display them on a local web server. The web server runs a simple script that displays a slide show of all of the photos stored on the card.

The final piece of the game is the physical target itself. The target is painted using acrylic paint onto a small tarp. The tarp is then attached to a square frame made from PVC pipe. The mouth of the fish is cut out of the tarp. A large piece of felt is then placed behind the hole with the piezo sensors attached. A short length of copper pipe helps to weigh down the bottom of the felt and keep it in place. The important thing is to make sure the felt isn’t touching the tarp. If it touches, it might be overly sensitive and trigger even when a player misses.

Now you know how to build your own Bass Master 3000 carnival game. Whether you rig the game or not is up to you. Also, be sure to check out a video of the system working below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Dic
06

The 86Duino Zero Runs Linux on x86

86Duino, 86Duino Zero, arduino, ethernet, i2c, ipc, Linux, microSD, PCIE, RTOS, SPI, Vortex86EX, x86, xISA Commenti disabilitati su The 86Duino Zero Runs Linux on x86 

86Duino_ZERO-45D

DM&P has been producing low-power, x86-based Vortex processors for the embedded market for over ten years. Now in a nod to the Arduino market they have released the 86Duino Zero, a low-cost Arduino Leonardo sized board powered by their latest 300 MHz SoC Vortex86EX Processor.

This is a fully static 32-bit x86 processor board compatible with Windows OS, Linux and most other popular 32-bit RTOS. It integrates a PCIE bus, DDR3, ROM controller, xISA, I2C, SPI, IPC (Internal Peripheral Controllers with DMA and interrupt timer/counter included). The 86Duino Zero’s ports include USB 2.0 host and device coastline ports, a 10/100 Ethernet port and a microSD slot on the bottom of the board. The Zero’s baseboard also provides a 7-12V power jack, a reset button and a PCIe expansion connector.

The Zero supplies 14 digital I/O pins, half of which can provide 32-bit resolution PWM outputs and six 11-bit analog input pins. Each standard I/O pin supplies 16 mA while the 3.3 V pins can supply up to 400 mA. Like the Intel Galileo development board announced several weeks ago the 86Duino Zero marries Intel architecture to the Arduino platform. Its $39 price tag makes it an attractive proposition. [via]

The 86Duino Zero Runs Linux on x86 - [Link]



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