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The concept of a smartwatch was thrown around for a long time before the technology truly came to fruition. Through the pursuit of miniaturisation, modern smartwatches are sleek, compact, and remarkably capable for their size. Companies such as Apple and Samsung throw serious money into research and development, but that doesn’t mean you can’t create something of your own. [Electronoobs] has done just that, with this Arduino-based smartwatch build.

The brain of the watch is that hacker staple, the venerable ATmega328, most well known for its use in the Arduino Uno and Nano platforms. An FTDI module is used for USB communication, making programming the board a snap. Bluetooth communication is handled by another pre-built module, and a smartphone app called Notiduino handles passing notifications over to the watch.

This is a build that doesn’t do anything crazy or difficult to understand, but simply combines useful parts in a very neat and tidy way. The watch is impressively thin and compact for a DIY build, and has a host of useful functions without going overboard.

We’ve seen other DIY builds in this space, too – such as this ESP8266-based smartwatch. Video after the break.

Although smartwatches were designed to be an easy-to-use alternative for your smartphone, interacting with their touchscreens still requires your opposite hand to be free. So what do you do when you’re carrying a bag of groceries or holding onto a bus handle?

This is the problem a Dartmouth-led team set out to solve with WristWhirl, a smartwatch prototype that uses the wrist wearing the device as a joystick to perform common touchscreen gestures with one-handed continuous input, while freeing up the other hand for other tasks.

WristWhirl was built using a two-inch TFT display and a plastic watch strap equipped with a dozen infrared proximity sensors and a piezo vibration sensor, which is connected to an Arduino Due board. Commands are then made by moving the hand as if it were operating a joystick, while a finger pinch turns the sensors on/off to indicate the start or end of a gesture.

For starters, the team implemented four sample applications with off-the-shelf games and Google Maps to illustrate potential use cases.

Four usage scenarios for WristWhirl were tested: 1) a gesture shortcuts app was created, which allowed users to access shortcuts by drawing gestures; 2) a music player app was created, which allowed users to scroll through songs through wrist-swipes and play a selected song by double tapping the thumb and index fingers; 3) a map app was implemented for which 2D maps could be panned and zoomed depending on where the watch was held in relation to one’s body; and 4) game input, which often requires continuous input was tested, for which Tetris was played using a combination of wrist swipes, wrist extension and wrist flexion.

You can read more about the project on its page here, as well as see a demonstration of it below!

 

screen-shot-2016-10-01-at-10-53-56-amDaniel Davis wanted to see if he could turn his "dumb" nokia phone and turn it into a smartwatch.

Read more on MAKE

The post Hacking a Nokia Phone into a New Smartwatch appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

pebbleHeroIf you already have a Raspberry Pi running a Node.js server, you're already on your way to controlling your home with a smartwatch.

Read more on MAKE

The post Hack Your Pebble Steel to Control Your Raspberry Pi appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Mag
08

Atmel-based smartwatch wins Make challenge

arduino, atmel, SmartWatch, watch Commenti disabilitati su Atmel-based smartwatch wins Make challenge 

oswatch-2

This watch, by Jonathan Cook, recently won MAKE’s Arduino Challenge, as posted on Bits and Pieces from the Embedded Design World. [via]

The watch is the latest iteration of an ongoing BLE watch endeavor Cook has been exploring for the past nine months. In addition to time and date functionality, he’s building interfacing that any smartwatch wearer would want — email, Facebook notification, Twitter updates, etc., and hopes to have the community further the platform as well.

Atmel-based smartwatch wins Make challenge - [Link]

Giu
27

Astrosmash style video game as Sony SmartWatch firmware

arduino, arduino hacks, astrosmash, SmartWatch, Sony Commenti disabilitati su Astrosmash style video game as Sony SmartWatch firmware 

sony-smartwatch-native-video-game

Here’s a firmware hack that brings a video game to the Sony SmartWatch. It’s pretty impressive considering the limited screen real estate and the fact that it has to be shared with the touch input. But we find it equally impressive that a game of this quality followed so quickly on the heels of Sony announcing the ability to make your own firmware for the watch. The speedy development is thanks partly to the community driven effort to hack the Arduino IDE to load sketches on the watch.

The advent of this IDE hack means that taking your Arduino sketch writing abilities to this hardware now has a fairly low learning curve. And reading through [Asier Arranz's] game code will make it even easier. He calls his game Star Wars but it reminds us more of Astrosmash. There’s a little green semicircle which is your ground-based defense vehicle. You need to fire the laser to shoot falling items out of the star-strewn night sky while also collecting power-ups that fall to the ground. Game play video is below.

Just remember, if you come up with a cool firmware app for the SmartWatch we want to hear about it.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Giu
22

Sony SmartWatch running Arduino sketches

arduino, arduino hacks, sketch, SmartWatch, Sony Commenti disabilitati su Sony SmartWatch running Arduino sketches 

sony-smartwatch-arduino-sketches

Well that didn’t take long. We just heard last week about the Sony inviting firmware hacks for their SmartWatch and here’s an early example. This image above is an animation running on the watch. It was written as an Arduino sketch which runs on a custom firmware image. [Veqtor] wrote the sketch, which is just a couple of nested loops drawing lines and circles. The real hack is in the firmware itself.

[Veqtor] took part in a workshop (translated) put on by [David Cuartielles] which invited attendees to try their Arduino coding skills on his firmware hack for the watch. It implements an Android parser, but the development is in very early stages. Right now there’s zero information in his readme file. But the root directory of the repo has a huge todo list. Dig through it and see if you can fork his code to help lend a hand.

Learn more about the SmartWatch firmware from the original announcement.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Giu
12

One day of “smart” hacking in Malmö

Arduino Verkstad, IDE, SmartWatch, Sony, workshop, Workshops Commenti disabilitati su One day of “smart” hacking in Malmö 

SmartWatch

Next weekend Arduino Verkstad in Malmö  is organizing a one-day workshop in collaboration with Sony Mobile to experiment on programming from the Arduino IDE on Sony SmartWatch.

You don’t have to be a programmer to participate because this is low level hacking and if you, for example, are interested in graphic design or interaction design this might be something for you. Participants will work in groups and get tutoring throughout  to test the watch and modify it  on custom ideas.

The hands-on event will take place saturday 15th of June from 12 to 18 at STPLN in the city of Malmö (Sweden) . There is a limited amount of spots for the event and you can sign up by sending an e-mail to s.zetterdahl [at] arduino.cc no later than Friday the 14th of June.

In order to prepare grouping, please add some info on your technical background and language spoken (English/Swedish/Spanish). Attendance is for free and they will serve lunch and coffee.

The event is hosted in association with STPLN and Fabriken

 

 



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