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Archive for the ‘cake’ Category

What’s a hacker going to do with an oven? Reflow solder? Dry out 3D printing filament? If you are [Alicia Gibb] you’d be baking a cake. While complaining that projects aren’t a hack seems to be a favorite past time for Hackaday commentators, we think [Alicia] will be in the clear. Why? Because these cakes have Arduinos, LEDs, and motorized candles among other gizmos.

The Game Boy cake is undeniably cool, although we have to admit the cake that screams when cut got our attention (see video below), even if it would unnerve guests.

As you might expect, you can’t bake the electronics directly into the cake. [Alicia] uses Tupperware or parchment paper to create cavities for the electronics. Connections and other solder joints get professional grade Saran wrap to keep the lead and other awful chemicals out of the cake.

We’ve seen embedded electronics in cakes before, including some that tie into the Star Wars merchandising that seems unavoidable lately. If you aren’t much of a baker, you could always just forego the cake part.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, cooking hacks

Making someone a birthday cake is very thoughtful, but not if they are watching their weight. [MrFox] found a way around that: an Arduino-powered birthday cake. Even if you don’t mind the calories, an Arduino cake is a novelty and sure to be a hit with a hacker who’s another year older.

The cake uses a UTFT LCD shield which eats up a lot of pins and memory, so the project uses an Arduino Mega. A speaker plays the happy birthday song (which may even be legal now) while a microphone detects the birthday boy or girl blowing out the virtual candles.

We’ve seen similar cakes with a fixed number of LED “candles” before, but the LCD screen makes this a cake of a different color. If you want, you could look into something that is actually edible. On the other hand, we’re kind of partial to the Jolly Wrencher with red eyes and fireworks, ourselves.

The video shows the birthday cake in action. Given the screen, we were surprised that nothing popped out. Not a life-changing project, but still fun for your next hacker party, even if you have a real cake as a backup.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

coverNicole Grimwood is working towards a dual degree in engineering from Columbia University and liberal arts from Scripps College.

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The post Interview: NIcole Grimwood on Electronics (and Cake) appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

vlcsnap-2015-07-30-14h43m03s148Everyone loves dessert, but what if they could light up and play animations? I'll show you how to make a dessert tray with a built-in LED matrix.

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The post LED Matrix Dessert Tray appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

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Arduino-Controlled Daft Punk Cake

arduino, cake, daft punk, Electronics, Food & Beverage, LEGO Commenti disabilitati su Arduino-Controlled Daft Punk Cake 

DaftPunk2The Arduino has a blog post about a cool project, a 5-foot Daft Punk tribute cake equipped with moving rice krispie heads and light-up eyes, all controlled by an Arduino Mega. And did you spot the Lego neck articulation? BY John Baichtal My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, comics, scifi, […]

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A cake maker with a passion for engineering and Daft Punk

arduino, cake, electro, mega, servo, servos Commenti disabilitati su A cake maker with a passion for engineering and Daft Punk 

DaftPunkCake

Shantal Der Boghosian is the owner and cake decorator of Shakar Bakery, but also an engineer and a chemist based in Los Angeles California. She recently wrote us to share her 5ft (152cm) tall tribute cake for Daft Punk, the French electronic music duo, and created together with her sister and Garen (coder).

DaftPunk1 DaftPunk2 DaftPunk3

The cool thing about this project is that the bodies of the band are made of cake and the heads move at the rhythm of the track “Get Lucky”, controlled by Arduino Mega.

This project took 2 months to design, over 100 hours to build the structure and another 100 hours spent on the electronics, programming, and mechanics . We had a lot of bumps in the road and we worked through every single one. This was the first time I ever built a cake structure, the first time I sculpted with rice krispies, and the first time I built a cake on such a massive scale! This was Garen’s first time coding an Arduino servo, and creating head motions that defied weight restraints! I have to admit that we did a last minute surgery to the silver helmet to make the “no” motion more fluid.

Enjoy the video below and take a look at her detailed blogpost with all the phases of the complex yummy construction!



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