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Archive for the ‘ATTiny45’ Category

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08

Attiny25/45/85 police light with Arduino

arduino, ATtiny25, ATTiny45, ATTINY85, LED, light, police Commenti disabilitati su Attiny25/45/85 police light with Arduino 

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Another Instructables by Jan Henrik, a police light with a Attiny25/45/85. He writes:

Hello, in this project I want to show you how to build a multi functional Police Light with a Attiny25/45/85 .

It will have several animations , which can be changed with a button on the circuit board, it has 2 channels, which can be controlled with PWM. That allows us to add serval animations or police light flashing sequences. The maximum rated current per channel is 500mA, that allows us to control high power LED´s, LED stripes or old Light Bulbs!

[via]

Attiny25/45/85 police light with Arduino - [Link]

Apr
19

Simplest and Cheapest Arduino

arduino, ATtiny44, ATTiny45, ATTINY85, Tiny Arduino Commenti disabilitati su Simplest and Cheapest Arduino 

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smching @ instructables.com writes:

Use a ATTiny85 (can be ATTiny45, ATTiny44) to make an Arduino just for US3.00 and name it as Tiny Arduino.

Tiny Arduino have only eight pins as shown in figure above, Pin4 is ground (Gnd), Pin8 is 5V (Vcc), Pin1 is Reset, Pin2 and Pin3 originally used to connecting the Crystal. In order to utilize all the IO, the internal oscillator (RC Oscillator) is used to replace the external clock which require a crystal. Therefore the Tiny Arduino is now come with five IO. Below shows the Arduino IO functions.

Simplest and Cheapest Arduino - [Link]

Ott
22

Turn a PC on with a Knock and an ATTiny

arduino hacks, attiny, ATTiny45, computer hacks, knock, microcontrollers, piezoelectric Commenti disabilitati su Turn a PC on with a Knock and an ATTiny 

knockAttiny

Pressing the power button on your computer usually isn’t too much trouble, unless your computer is stored away somewhere hard to reach. [Joonas] has been hard at work on a solution that would also impress his friends, building a knock sensor to turn on his PC.

For around $10 in parts he put together an ATTiny45 that emulates a PS/2 device, which takes advantage of his computer’s ability to boot upon receiving PS/2 input. The build uses a Piezo buzzer and a 1M Ohm resistor as a knock sensor exactly as the official Arduino tutorial demonstrates, and one of those PS/2-to-USB adapters that are most likely lurking in the back corner of every drawer in your office.

[Joonas] used AVRweb to disable the 8X clock divider so there’d be enough clock cycles for PS/2 communication, then loaded some test code to make sure the vibrations were being detected correctly. You can check out his Github for the final code here, and stick around after the break for a quick video demo. Then check out a similar hack with [Mathieu's] home automation knock sensor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTVppOZquE8


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, computer hacks, Microcontrollers
Ago
10

BareDuino micro

arduino, ATmega328P, attiny, ATTiny45, ATTINY85, Mcu Commenti disabilitati su BareDuino micro 

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Niek designed this BareDuino micro, that is available at github:

For some Arduino projects, you don’t actually need that many IO pins. That’s exactly the case when I tried to build a simple RGB throwie that would cycle through colours. I was looking for a cheaper alternative to the Arduino UNO’s ATmega328P when I stumbled across this post by MIT’s High-Low Tech lab. They developed a library for programming the 8-pins ATtiny45/85 from the Arduino IDE. It’s a very smart solution to use permanently in some low pin-usage projects, but you still need to hook up individual wires from your programmer to the ATtiny to be able to program it. That’s when I came up with the idea of the BareDuino Micro.

[via]

BareDuino micro - [Link]

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26

ATtiny programmer using Arduino ISP

arduino, ATmega328, attiny, ATTiny45, ATTINY85, avrdude, DASA, isp, Mcu, USBtinyISP Commenti disabilitati su ATtiny programmer using Arduino ISP 

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JeonLab @ instructables.com writes:

For relatively small (less number of pins than ATmega328) projects, ATtiny series, ATtiny45 or Attiny85 are good choice in terms of its physical size (8-DIP or 8-SOIC) and low power consumption. There are many ways to program it. One of the popular device is USBtinyISP and DASA. Both of them work very well with WinAVR (AVRdude).

ATtiny programmer using Arduino ISP - [Link]



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