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Archive for the ‘ATmega328P’ Category

Feb
06

Piconomic FW Library 0.4.2 released

ADC, arduino, arduino uno, ATmega328P, atmel, AVR, GPIO, i2c, Piconomic, SPI Commenti disabilitati su Piconomic FW Library 0.4.2 released 

tera_term_cli

by Pieter @ piconomic.co.za:

If you can beg, steal or borrow an Atmel ISP programmer, then you can use the Arduino environment to develop on the Atmel AVR Atmega328P Scorpion Board. An Arduino on Scorpion Board guide, Optiboot bootloader and example sketches have been added.

If you own an Arduino Uno board, you can now try out the Piconomic FW Library risk free without abandoning the creature comforts of the Arduino environment. You can use the existing Optiboot bootloader to upload code. I have added a getting started guide for the Arduino Uno. There are examples, including a CLI (Command Line Interpreter) Application that creates a “Linux Shell”-like environment running on the Arduino Uno so that you can experiment with GPIO, ADC, I2C and SPI using only Terminal software (for example Tera Term)… it is really cool!

Piconomic FW Library 0.4.2 released - [Link]

Nov
07

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor

arduino, ATmega328P, monitor, moteino, temperature Commenti disabilitati su Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor 

collage-600x332

Colin over at CuPID Controls writes:

We want to put our remote sense and control modules out into the wild and read and aggregate them as it makes sense.
Our basic system layout is as below. We’ve got multiple wireless nodes that broadcast data periodically, and a controller/aggregator that will log this data, acknowledge receipt, and do something useful with it. Eventually, we may have intermediate powered nodes that serve to mesh the grid out, but for now, our nodes just send data to the controller.
We’re currently using these awesome little RF units, called Moteinos. They are an Arduino clone that can use the standard IDE with their bootloader. They’ve got the ever-so-popular ATMega328P chip that is familiar to anybody working with an Arduino Nano or Uno.

[via]

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor - [Link]

Set
28

Ardubracelet Lets you Play Tetris on your Wrist!

Arduboy, ardubracelet, arduino hacks, ATmega328P, tetris, wrist tetris Commenti disabilitati su Ardubracelet Lets you Play Tetris on your Wrist! 

Tetris on your wrist!

Making your own Tetris game is almost a rite of passage for hackers — [Kevin] has stepped up the game a little by making this awesome-flexible-triple-displayed-Tetris-watch dubbed the Ardubracelet.

At the recent Maker Faire SF our head editor [Mike] got a chance to meet with [Kevin] from Arduboy who told us about some of his upcoming projects — this wearable was one of them!

It features three super bright OLED screens on a flexible circuit board with conductive touch buttons to continue with the minimalist design. Instead of a wrist strap he’s actually made the ends magnetic to hold it in place — did we mention the battery also lasts for over 10 hours?

At the heart of the flexible circuit board is an Atmega328p, which is the same chip used in the Arduboy (a credit card sized GameBoy). This is just the first prototype but he’s planning on making it even better in the future complete with Bluetooth and some 3D printed parts to make it look a bit nicer.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Set
23

On Arduino due PWM frequency

arduino, ATmega328P, PWM Commenti disabilitati su On Arduino due PWM frequency 

pwm_frequency-600x433

Kerry D. Wong writes:

I just got myself a couple of Arduino Due boards. While they were released almost two years ago, I have not really got a chance to look at these until quite recently. Arduino Due is based on Atmel’s ATSAM3x8E 32-bit ARM Cortext-M3 processor. The processor core runs at 84 MHz, which is significantly faster than its 8-bit AVR counterpart ATmega328p which runs at 16 MHz. For an ATmega328p, the highest achievable PWM frequency is 8Mhz (square wave), so we should be able to generate much higher frequency signals on an Arduino Due. But how high can we go? Let’s find out.

[via]

On Arduino due PWM frequency - [Link]

Mag
09

Embedded Video Engine for Arduino

arduino, ATmega328P, FTDI, LCD, VM800P Commenti disabilitati su Embedded Video Engine for Arduino 

FTDIdisplay

This week FTDI Chip have announced a range of Arduino-compatible development platforms to support the company’s Embedded Video Engine (EVE) technology. The VM800P series provides engineers with everything necessary to implement Human Machine Interfaces (HMIs) featuring display, audio, touch elements and data processing aspects too.

The units can be programmed using the standard Arduino IDE (using a pre-programmed Arduino-compatible bootloader). In addition to support for various Arduino libraries, every VM800P incorporates an FTDI Chip FT800 EVE graphic controller IC and its FT232R USB interface IC as well as an ATMega328P 8-bit microcontroller running at 16 MHz. Also featured are a touch-enabled display LCD panel, a backlight LED driver, an audio power amplifier and a micro speaker. A choice of 3.5, 4.3 and 5.0-inch display formats is available which have precision fitted bezels to enable operation in industrial environments. The VM800P units also have a USB serial port for firmware upload and application communication, a battery-backed real time clock (RTC) for carrying out system timing and a micro SD socket loaded with a 4GByte SD card containing sample applications. [via]

Embedded Video Engine for Arduino - [Link]

Mar
17

U-nex – a Arduino compatible, 32KB USB development board for $9, on Indiegogo

arduino, ATmega328P, U-nex, USB Commenti disabilitati su U-nex – a Arduino compatible, 32KB USB development board for $9, on Indiegogo 

unex-500x500

An incredibly small board at your fingertip: raising funds on Indiegogo!

A 100% Arduino IDE compatible, 32KB USB development board small enough to fit on your fingertips and cheap enough to leave in any project.

Having used several development boards over the years we soon realized that most of them are designed to be used for a single purpose. Having hacked some to increase functionality, we reasoned that not all boards would easily allow this and soon realized the need for boards which are feature rich, cost effective, yet easy to use and deploy in numerous applications. We set out to design such boards and this is where it has led us, our first pit-stop: The µ-nex.

The u-nex is a very compact Arduino compatible board designed around the Atmega328p micro-controller. It features 32KB of flash memory with ALL the micro-controller pins being brought out to enable you to build just about anything you would want to build with an 8-bit micro-controller from autonomous flying vehicles to LED cubes. Designed from the ground up to give you maximum possible versatility.

U-nex – a Arduino compatible, 32KB USB development board for $9, on Indiegogo - [Link]

Mar
03

Arduboy: The Interactive Digital Business Card

Arduboy, arduino, ATmega328P, business card Commenti disabilitati su Arduboy: The Interactive Digital Business Card 

ArduBoy-550x550

This is a great credit card sized business card and gaming console based on Arduino.

The primary trick of this design is having milled cutouts made for surface mount components to be press fit into, using the circuit board as a kind of frame. Components selected have a thickness near that of the circuit board (1.6mm). Furthermore, to minimize the board thickness, the Atmega328P is inverted so that the bulk of its height below the surface. The result of equal thickness and recessed installation provides a flush appearance. The primary benefit beyond the aesthetic quality is the device is easily slid from a wallet. The high quality boards and the excellent service from oshpark also makes this build possible.

[via]

Arduboy: The Interactive Digital Business Card - [Link]

Ott
28

Building a constant current/constant power electronic load

arduino, ATmega328P, current, Load, power, Test/Measurements Commenti disabilitati su Building a constant current/constant power electronic load 

ElectronicLoad200W-600x450

Kerry Wong built a DIY constant current/constant power electronic load. It can sink more than 200W of power:

A while back I built a simple constant current electronic load using an aluminum HDD cooler case as the heatsink. While it was sufficient for a few amps’ load under low voltages, it could not handle load much higher than a few dozen watts at least not for a prolonged period of time. So this time around, I decided to build a much beefier electronic load so it could be used in more demanding situations.
One of the features a lot of commercial electronic loads has in common is the ability to sink constant power. Constant power would come in handy when measuring battery capacities (Wh) or testing power supplies for instance. To accommodate this, I decided to use an Arduino (ATmega328p) microcontroller.

[via]

Building a constant current/constant power electronic load - [Link]

Ago
10

BareDuino micro

arduino, ATmega328P, attiny, ATTiny45, ATTINY85, Mcu Commenti disabilitati su BareDuino micro 

dingetje-600x400

Niek designed this BareDuino micro, that is available at github:

For some Arduino projects, you don’t actually need that many IO pins. That’s exactly the case when I tried to build a simple RGB throwie that would cycle through colours. I was looking for a cheaper alternative to the Arduino UNO’s ATmega328P when I stumbled across this post by MIT’s High-Low Tech lab. They developed a library for programming the 8-pins ATtiny45/85 from the Arduino IDE. It’s a very smart solution to use permanently in some low pin-usage projects, but you still need to hook up individual wires from your programmer to the ATtiny to be able to program it. That’s when I came up with the idea of the BareDuino Micro.

[via]

BareDuino micro - [Link]



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