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mechbox

Les Boites Mécaniques are a set of four automated boxes that produce music out of wood and metal. These experimental instruments enable anyone to explore the magic of making sound by pressing buttons on a remote, which activate each respective device to vibrate, knock, and rub materials.

The boxes were developed by Kogumi‘s Anatole Buttin and Yan Godat for educational electronic music workshops, and can be played either solo or in unison. There’s even a mode that allows users to control it all via MIDI notes on a computer.

In terms of hardware, each box is equipped with an Arduino Uno, a TLC59711 LED driver, step motors with AccelStepper library and a 3D-printed microstep driver.

Watch the video below to see how it all comes together to create a unique sound!

[Rjeuch] liked a wooden clock he saw on the Internet, but the gears were produced with a proprietary software tool. So he built his own version. Unlike the original, however, he chose to use a stepper motor to drive the hands.

The clock’s gears aren’t just for show, and the post does a good job explaining how the gears work, how you might customize them, and how they fit together. The clock’s electronics rely on an Arduino.

The issue with an Arduino, of course, is that the time base isn’t always good enough to keep time over long periods. To fix that problem [Rjeuch] used a ChronoDot which is a real-time clock that uses temperature compensation and claims to be accurate to a minute a year.

Of course, no plan goes off without a hitch. Owing to bad stepper mode specs, the original version of the clock was gaining time overnight. Although the stepper claimed to have a 1:64 reduction gear, the actual ratio wasn’t that precise ([Rjeuch] estimates it as 1:63.876. The steps he took to fix this are worth a read.

You can see a video of the clock below. We’ve seen lots of other clocks, of course. Some of them even make this one looks simple.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Giu
16

Explore This Elegant Wooden Arduino Puzzle Box

arduino, electronic, Electronics, Fun & Games, game, leds, pontentiometer, puzzle, wood, Woodworking Commenti disabilitati su Explore This Elegant Wooden Arduino Puzzle Box 

Minigame_1If you’re like me, you find yourself fighting the urge to push every button, flip every switch, and turn every knob you see. This arcade-style puzzle box was designed to satiate those deep-seated desires. Powered by an Arduino, with completely custom wooden enclosure and components, this is a wood shop geek’s first […]

Read more on MAKE

The post Explore This Elegant Wooden Arduino Puzzle Box appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Ott
14

Experimenting new interfaces for Radios with wood and fabric

arduino, conductive fabric, Featured, radio, wood Commenti disabilitati su Experimenting new interfaces for Radios with wood and fabric 

experimentalradio

An Interaction and Industrial Designer studying at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh tried to re-imagine the way we interact with radios to create a more meaningful relationship between the user and the artefact.

Radios have been around since the 1920s but the devices we have at home haven’t changed much even if they were designed nearly 100 years ago and share similar elements like switches, knobs, sliders.

Yaakov Lyubetsky worked on a prototype of The Experimental Form Radio using Arduino Uno:

When The Experimental Form Radio is laying on a tabletop, it is off. To turn the radio on, you pick it up and slot it onto a wall mount. The radio leverages the elastic qualities of fabric to control stations and volume. To change stations you press lightly and slide your finger along the fabric surface. To change the volume you press firmly into the fabric, and then slide your finger along the deeper cavity in the radio. The video below showcases the interaction.

Requiring the user to pick up and wall mount the radio to turn on creates a ritualistic experience with a very simple feedback mechanism. If the radio is hanging on the wall it’s on, if the radio is laying on a flat surface then it’s off. The visual and auditory feedback allows the user to have a clear understanding of the system state.

Even cooler than the video above is the next one, showing all the “Making of” process to build the wooden piece and the soft interface:

The project uses an Arduino Uno board with a custom circuit made with three independent layers of conductive fabric and conductive thread. Touching together two layers of conductive fabric completes one of twelve circuits that then either change the radio station or the volume.

Take a look at the additional documentation on his website.

Nov
14

Lo-fi display made of 64 wooden blocks

8bit, analog, arduino, Art, digital, physical, pixel, Retro, servo, wood Commenti disabilitati su Lo-fi display made of 64 wooden blocks 

Wooden Pixel Display 64 - WPD64

Han Lee wrote us to submit a project about analog wooden blocks  acting as digital pixels and controlled by Arduino. Wooden Pixel Display 64 is composed by 64 wood pixels in a  8×8 grid and originally prototyped  using Lego:

One pixel might make you bored but it gives you something interesting when pixels make a form together. This WPD64 has been presented at a generative art show in NYC recently.

I used Arduino Uno and four of Adafruit 16-Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo Shield to control 64 servos. Laser cutting service from Pololu.com for the front cover which should have 64 square holes at the perfect grid.

Enjoy the video below!  ;^)


 

Ago
12

My open-source, do-it-yourself cellphone (built with Arduino).

cellphone, CNC, Eagle, gsm, laser cutter, matrix, wireless, wood, Workshops Commenti disabilitati su My open-source, do-it-yourself cellphone (built with Arduino). 

DIY cellphone (in hand)

For a little over a year, I’ve been working on an open-source, DIY cellphone as part of my PhD research at the MIT Media Lab. The current version of the phone is based on the Arduino GSM shield and Arduino GSM library. It sports a deliberately low-resolution screen (8 characters, each a 5×7 matrix of LEDs), a laser-cut wooden enclosure, flexure (living hinge) buttons, and a ~1000-line Arduino program that powers the user interface. The phone can make and receive phone calls and text messages, includes a phone book and caller id, and keeps the time. Everything you’d expect from a 20-year old Nokia! (Except snake.) I’ve been using various iterations of the project as my primary cellphone for the past six months or so.

DIY Cellphone (LED matrix variant)DIY Cellphone (LED matrix variant)

The phone is open-source and the design files are available on GitHub (hardware, software). Assembly instructions are on my website, although I wouldn’t recommend making your own unless you have experience with soldering surface mount components.

Second DIY cellphone workshop

Of course, it’s not just me that’s been building these phones. I’ve run two workshops in which other people have made them for themselves. A few people have been building them on their own, including someone who posted his result on Twitter.

Ben Peters' Phone.Dena's purpleheart phoneNadya and Jeff making cellphones

Here you can see some the variations on the enclosure that my friends have made. On the left is a 3d-printed case by Ben Peters, the middle is a CNC-milled purpleheart wood case by Dena Molnar, and on the right is a hand-cut cardboard case by Jeffrey Warren.

DIY Cellphone Prototypes

The phone has undergone numerous revisions as I’ve tried to get it into a robust, useable form. Here you can see some of those variations. I started with an LCD screen like those found on old Nokia phones, but it would break after a month or so in my pocket, so I switched to the more-robust LED matrix. The enclosure has had a few tweaks as well, primarily to find a good design for the flexure buttons.

DIY Cellphone (LED matrix variant)

Overall, I’m pretty happy with the current incarnation. It seems to be relatively robust, simple enough to assemble by hand, and functional enough to use everyday (although a long way from a smart phone). That’s my DIY cellphone.



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