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Giu
16

Watch Massimo Banzi’s presentation at Computer History Museum

arduino, community, events, Exhibition, Featured, history, history of electronics, keynote, Mountain View, Museums, open source, video Commenti disabilitati su Watch Massimo Banzi’s presentation at Computer History Museum 

ComputerHistory

Last month Massimo Banzi gave a lecture at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View (California, US). It was titled The Arduino Experience and covered the historical origins of Arduino, including a explanation of the process of designing tools which make digital technology accessible to people who are not experts, and the essential role of the larger Arduino ecosystem that supports it. After the keynote Len Shustek, chairman of the board of the Museum, curated a session of Q&A. If you didn’t have the chance to be there, the recorded video is online and you can watch it now:

 


Giu
12

Memories from Arduino Day! Download the poster

arduino day, community, Featured Commenti disabilitati su Memories from Arduino Day! Download the poster 

Arduino Day

After Arduino Day we received a lot of pictures from 266 events in 71 countries all over the world and they were really cool That’s why we created a poster and would like to share it with you:

Download the poster of Arduino Day 2015 at this link, print it out and spot yourself in it!

 

 

Mag
20

Are you a developer? Take a 10-min survey and shape a new dev report

community, Featured, iot, Opinion, research, survey Commenti disabilitati su Are you a developer? Take a 10-min survey and shape a new dev report 

visionmobile01
How will IoT play out in your ecosystem? Is HTML vs. Native still relevant? Are you using AWS, Azure or Google Cloud? Which are the hottest IoT verticals? These are some of the questions that researchers at VisionMobile address through their 9th edition of Developer Economics research launched at the beginning of this month. You can make your voice heard taking the 10-minute Developer Skill Census survey and later read key insights given back to the community as a free download in late July.

The Developer Economics research program tracks developer sentiment across platforms, revenues, apps, tools, APIs, segments and regions, tackling some of 2015’s most commonly asked questions. It’s the largest, most global app developer research & engagement program reaching up to 10,000 developers in over 140 countries and we believe open source developers could give an interesting point of view on the topic!

After  taking the survey, you can download immediately a free chapter from one of VisionMobile’s premium paid reports taking a close look at app profits & costs and also enter a draw to win prizes such as an iPhone 6, an Apple Sports Watch, an Oculus Rift Dev Kit, and many more.

Mag
05

Sneak peak on the new, web-based Arduino Create

ACE, Arduino Create, community, create, Featured, IDE, Software Commenti disabilitati su Sneak peak on the new, web-based Arduino Create 

Blogpost_Post

We always stress the fact that Arduino is not only a matter of hardware. Arduino has two other important pieces, the software and the community. We recently wrote about an improved Arduino Software (IDE) and how we moved from nightly builds to hourly builds, thanks to the help of our programmers and contributors. Now we want to add more power to the community and its capacity to create amazing projects.

In the past year we have been incredibly busy designing a new Arduino web-based tool, Arduino Create. It’s an important step in the Arduino ecosystem that (we hope) is going to change the way you interact with your projects and the community.

Over the years we gathered a lot of feedback both when running workshops in schools and maker spaces, and when reading comments on the Forum and other social networks. We understood we needed to provide the Arduino community with a more modern and flexible tool to write code, a more integrated way of accessing content and learning while doing, an easier way to setup and configure tools and boards, and a better way to share Arduino projects.

More and more products traditionally delivered as desktop apps are being moved to online platforms, and we see an opportunity in this. Arduino Create is a set of online tools that will make working with Arduino even more seamless and smooth.

First of all you will be able to write code and upload sketches to any Arduino board directly from the browser with the Arduino Web Editor (IDE), without having to install anything. Your Sketchbook will be stored on the Arduino Cloud and will be accessible from any device. The Getting Started app will allow you to easily configure and setup tools and boards available around you. Services provided by partners such as Temboo will be just one click away and better integrated with your workflow.

Blogpost_f1 Blogpost_f2 Blogpost_f3 Blogpost_f5 Blogpost_f7 Blogpost_f8 Blogpost_f9 Blogpost_f10

 

Arduino Create will simplify building a project as a whole, without having to switch between many different tools to manage the all the aspects of whatever you are making.
In this past year we focused our effort mainly in the Arduino Web Editor, but we really want to concentrate on content next, providing you with a curated set of projects and tutorials to get you inspired.

Our team, together with ToDo, developed a pilot version of Arduino Create for the Arduino TRE board.
We did a lot of research to design and develop this new web-platform right. We started with paper prototyping and co-creation sessions in the local Fablab, 6-months later we had around 150 Arduino TRE beta-testers giving us feedback on both the software, and the overall user experience of the product. 8 months into the project, in the Arduino Workshop area within Maker Faire Rome, we conducted about 25 user-testing sessions to refine some usability details. Talking with a great variety of people is always key in our design and development process, since Arduino has to fit the needs of users with a big skill-set range, from total beginners to experts.

We are now in the process of making Arduino Create reachable by anyone on a browser via www.arduino.cc. This post is a sneak peak on this effort.

Here some of the features of Arduino Create (some still in the works*):

  • Integration with the Arduino account, just sign in to access the web IDE
  • Your Sketchbook on the Arduino Cloud, available anytime from any device
  • A guided walkthrough to setup and configure Arduino Create for the first time
  • Latest version of the Arduino Web Editor (based on ACE), the board cores, and the libraries, always available without having to install anything
  • Auto-discovery of boards and ports available around you, selectable in one single dropdown
  • Examples presented with Schematics and Layout details
  • A Readme tab included in each sketch so that you can add some project’s details, if comments on your code gets too verbose
  • Ability to add custom Schematics and Layout PNGs to your sketch, so that you have in one place the all basic elements of your project
  • Better integration with Language Reference* and Glossary
  • Ability to share a sketch and embed it in your webpage or blog*
  • Notification area to be always up-to-date with the latest news (new library or core, new feature available, etc)*
  • Video tutorials and Help resources available directly within the Editor*

Of course we will continue to develop and improve the desktop Arduino IDE, this online version will give us an opportunity to test new features and provide users with a more cohesive experience when making projects with Arduino.

In mid June we plan to start a beta-testing program of Arduino Create, stay tuned for updates!

 

Apr
20

Want to help Arduino.CC? Take a pic of your Arduino packages!

arduino, community, Featured, hashtag, manufacturing, trademark Commenti disabilitati su Want to help Arduino.CC? Take a pic of your Arduino packages! 

ArduinoManufactured

We are posting below an interesting blogpost published on the Adafruit’s website on Sunday April 19th, and then mentioned by Hackaday.

Give it a read and use the #TeamArduinoCC tag when posting a pic of your packaging: that’s how you can show your support to Arduino.cc!

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Please post old Arduino packaging that says “Manufactured under license from Arduino” #TeamArduinoCC
Hey folks, as a lot of you know there’s a huge Arduino vs Arduino dispute (Hackaday / MAKE coverage / Arduino.cc). We’re currently making an official Arduino with Arduino.cc so we’re not commenting at this time for all sorts of good reasons, however, we, as in the Arduino.cc community, could use your help. If you could dig up any old Arduino packaging that has “Manufactured under license from Arduino by SMART PROJECTS” and post the photos – that could be pretty helpful for “team Arduino.cc”.

PLEASE INDICATE what country where you purchased the products in and what year!

IMG_2947

Pictured above, an Arduino UNO from September 2014 from Becky Stern’s desk. She had it unopened and we were able to see an important detail “Manufactured under license from Arduino by SMART PROJECTS S.r.l. Via Romano, 12 10010 Scarmagno Italy.

adafruit_4531

Please post any old packaging you have from older Arduino products that also have this on Flickr, G+, Instagram, Twitter, wherever you can, you can use the tag #TeamArduinoCC to help. You can also email it to teamarduinocc@adafruit.com


 

Here’s a video showing where’s the sentence mentioned by Adafruit and below the #TeamArduinoCC  hashtag timeline:

 

Apr
08

Thanks for Celebrating Arduino Day around the world!

arduino, arduino day, around the world, birthday, community, events, Featured Commenti disabilitati su Thanks for Celebrating Arduino Day around the world! 

thanks_arduino day_post
At the end of March Arduino Day was celebrated around the world in more than 260 official and community events. In the video below Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles, Tom Igoe and David Mellis sent a message to the whole community from the celebration taking place at MIT in Boston:

Take a look at some pictures from official Arduino Day which happened in Boston, Torino, Malmo, Budapest and Bangalore and some birthday cakes popping up on Twitter:

We also wanted to share  links some  organizers sent us to explore pictures/videos of local communities’ gatherings:

Do you have pictures and videos to share of your Arduino Day? Post the link in the comments!

Mar
20

Dear Arduino community, we need to talk

about, Announcements, arduino, brand, community Commenti disabilitati su Dear Arduino community, we need to talk 

This is the message Massimo Banzi’s just published on the forum.

——————

Today is the day of a solar eclipse, some of these are once in a lifetime events.

Arduino is definitely one of the events that will define my life along with many other people’s life.

I’m feeling incredibly blessed to have contributed to create this amazing community which gathered around the idea that we can empower people to master complex technologies and unleash their ability to create with them.

Dear community I’m sorry I didn’t comment earlier, I was keeping quiet to try to find a resolution to our internal issues that would not damage you, the community.

We’ve been so committed to keep the issues internal that for a year we haven’t receiving any royalty from the boards made in Italy, but we continued to work hoping to find a solution. I’ve told the story to Make read it if you want to know more.

Now the other party has abandoned the negotiating table and, after a lot of recent events, the cat is out of the bag. I owe you to be part of what is going on.

We created Arduino based on a set of values that have enabled the community to grow, touch any kind of people and contribute to changing the world a bit.

I am here to say that we will continue to fight so that Arduino stays true to those values. There is only one Arduino and there is only one Arduino community. We’re strong, we’re having a positive impact on so many people’s life.

We have so many news we want to share with you but be patient until Arduino Day, let’s celebrate together the amazing community we are (261 Global events!!!) , and you’ll know more.

I’m sure you have a lot of questions an we’re going to try to answer them in due time, compatibly with the fact that lawyers are involved and I can’t say too much.

An eclipse is just a temporary moment of darkness, but soon after the sun comes back shining.

The sun is about to come out, wear your sunglasses!!

Massimo Banzi with David Cuartielles, Tom Igoe , David Mellis

Feb
13

29th of March: A celebration of 10 years of Arduino and its worldwide community

Announcements, ArduinoDay, celebration, community Commenti disabilitati su 29th of March: A celebration of 10 years of Arduino and its worldwide community 

ARDUINODAY

Arduino Day  is a worldwide celebration of Arduino’s first 10 years. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.

Arduino invites Arduino user groups, makerspaces, hackerspaces, fablabs, associations, studios, educators, beginners and pro to take part to a day of celebration.

Every Arduino Day event is modular. All over the world, organizers can plan different types of activities according to different audiences and skills.

You can attend any event or organize one for your community.

It doesn’t matter whether you are an expert or a newbie, an engineer, designer, crafter or maker: Arduino Day is open to anyone who wants to celebrate Arduino and all the things that have been done (or can be done!) with it.

The events set up by independent organizers will offer different types of activities, tailored to local audiences all over the world.

  1. Fill out this online form to submit your proposal.
  2. Once your idea is approved, a pin marking the spot of your event will be added to the map on the Arduino Day website.

    You’ll also receive a confirmation email with a link to download your Digital Kit, which includes:

    • Official Arduino Day posters
    • Event flyer
    • Official signage system
    • Badges
    • And a 10% discount code for the Arduino Store

digitalkit

The call will close 15th March 2014. Ready to join us? Follow this hashtag #ArduinoD14 and use it to promote your event!

Feb
12

DIY IWBs for Officine Arduino 2nd Birthday

community, events, Officine, Officine Arduino, Torino Commenti disabilitati su DIY IWBs for Officine Arduino 2nd Birthday 

Officine Arduino Party

Arduino has a little (yet effective) bit in Turin, and that’s Officine Arduino. We opened this place two years ago to offer a shelter to the Arduinians in northern Italy and host a makerspace, for their creations. We witnessed (and joined) the foundation of the Torino Fablab, an association offering the very same machines to anybody interested about the maker movement in Turin. On top of that, the all ardu-maker-fab-co-creative space is hosted in Toolbox Coworking.

It’s tough to weight all the efforts and failures and successes we reached in these two years. We’ve seen the birth of Verkstad Arduino, the Swedish Arduino Office which is sharing the same principles we’ve been looking for in conceiving this place: mixing the company approach and the horizontal, informal one of makerspaces and coworking spaces (aka collaboration spaces).

I love the way Arduino Team dealt with the growing of the project: create different little places rather than having a huge one.

Wonderful Lasercut

On top of that, Officine Arduino wouldn’t have been so without the help of Smartprojects (one of the main producers of Arduino). A selfless and generous helping hand towards us and towards italian makers in general. They lended us their lasercutter for 2 years, now that we are setted up they are going to lend the very same lasercut to another newborn fablab! This is the picture I took when I broght the lasercut back last week.

Interactive Whiteboard

Last year we celebrated our birthday with Josef Prusa and the building of ten reprap 3d printers. This year we want to dedicate our birthday to education, so we are going to host and build Interactive digital writeboards during the week end, following the Wiildos opensource project, with Pietro Pilolli (project host with Matteo Ruffoni e Massimo Bosetti).

Friday is important for yet another reason: Toolbox is going to host the press conference of the newborn italian maker association, inwhich Massimo plays the role of president: Make in Italy Cdb Onlus. If you are a journalist or maker you can enroll here to join the press conference.

tl;dr: we are partying this upcoming friday, if you pass by let us knowFB Event. Interested in building your own Interactive Open Source Digital Writeboard? Join the Make In Italy Cdb Onlus Press conference here.

 

Feb
10

Making is Best When it’s Done Together

around the world, community, Interaction Design, Ivrea, MAKE Magazine, Maker Faire, MakerFaire Commenti disabilitati su Making is Best When it’s Done Together 

makingtogether_massimo

(originally posted on Makezine)

 

This month I’d like to talk about the idea of making together and what it means for Arduino. The whole idea of being a maker involves concepts of collaboration, community, and working with other people. It’s very hard to be a maker and be by yourself locked in a room or even in a lab. It’s really something that involves a lot of collaborations at different levels.

Many people today know what Arduino is, but very few know about two projects I did before Arduino. They were my first attempts to solve the problems my students had in prototyping with electronics. I consider them “creative failures.” As makers, we welcome failure as a way to understand how to do it better the next time.

Those initial projects I prototyped were not working so well because the technology was not really good but mostly because when I developed these things I did them by myself. I didn’t involve other people and I was very inefficient in trying to get them to work properly. They solved a number of problems my students had, but they didn’t really get a lot of momentum.

Ten years ago I started teaching at Interaction Design Institute in Ivrea (unfortunately it doesn’t exist anymore) where the Olivetti company used to be. In the picture below you can see their building and it’s not hard to notice it was created with a “design” approach. Olivetti was one of the first companies in the world to really apply design to everything: from their typewriters, to their buildings and to their posters, etc. Mr. Olivetti had that idea factories should have paintings on the walls because workers should be surrounded by beauty and knowledge. It was part of a bigger approach putting people at the center. It was in this context at the institute where we developed a number of projects before we came out with Arduino in the shape you know it now.

makingtogether_ivrea

If you peel back the surface, underneath Arduino project you can find a lot of collaboration. On one side you can see a selection of pretty amazing open source software contributing to what Arduino has become. I’m talking about GCC, processing, wiring, AVR, and all the other contributions from the community. On the other side, I started to involve specific people.

I met David Cuartielles when he was researching in Ivrea and we started to talk about things we wanted to see in the platform to help our students getting started with electronics. Slowly we also got in touch with other people: Tom Igoe, a professor at ITP in New York with great experience; David Mellis, an amazing software developer who joined Ivrea from MIT; and Gianluca Martino, an electronics engineer who knows every company involved in electronics in the area. He’s now taking care of the manufacturing.

I gathered all these people one-by-one because we wanted to make an open project based on collaboration. All the founders brought their own experience into Arduino and later what became really important was the Arduino community. At the moment there is a community much larger than number of official Arduino boards we have sold. There are more than 180,000 people subscribed to the forum and more than 4 million monthly page views to the website with visitors spending about five minutes on each visit.

Arduino was born out of different contributions and it taught us to follow this path with most of our products. We started collaborating with other people and companies of the open source community, extending our role as makers into ideas and projects becoming products. Recently, we told you the story of the Arduino robot and an example of collaboration.

For example, some years ago, with Adafruit we developed the Arduino Micro packing all of the power of the Arduino Leonardo in a smaller board. We met with Limor and Phil sharing a lot of ideas and more projects are coming up in the next months.

At some point we also worked with Telefonica, a global mobile operator, to make the Arduino Gsm Shield. The technology of the shield is basic but we worked really hard to develop the API to use the module very easily. What’s important about these collaborations is not the technology but other things like lowering the barriers to access a sim card and allowing people to activate it very simply, just with a credit card. The value we created was about opening up a collaboration and making a big company like Telefonica aware of the impact of a product like this in the maker community.

A similar thing, but with a smaller company, happened for Arduino Yún. DogHunter, based in Taiwan, designed the board together with us. The factory we usually work with in Europe didn’t have the experience to work with wi-fi technology so we teamed up with a factory in Taiwan which had an experience with millions of access points. Arduino Yún became the first official board made in Asia.

In the first half of 2014 we are going to release the Arduino TRE. It’s a combination of a Beaglebone and an Arduino plus a number of things designed to make it very convenient for people to get started. We worked with Texas Instruments and especially Beagleboard, which shares with us a series of commitments to open source hardware and similar goals and ideas, like the desire for simplicity and ease of use.

Once again we realized how easier it is to find someone who can give you a cheaper piece of hardware, but in the long run, even if it’s harder to find someone who shares the same set of values, it’s well worth it.

We believe in the open source movement and everyone should be really aware that it can develop successfully if everyone takes from it, but especially if people and companies contribute back. That’s why it’s important to highlight who creates a positive loop and nurture knowledge sharing and collaboration.

makingtogether_mfrome

Even if there is the perception the maker movement is much more U.S.-centric, with a lot of visibility for American makers, events, and companies, we believed that we could do something to improve the relations among the movement here in Europe and activate more positive loops.

We realized that one of the issues was about language. Many European makers are very active in their local community, but they don’t Speak English. That’s why we decided to invest time and resources to create an European Maker Faire in Rome, inviting people from all over the continent. It was not easy to organize it, but I can say that it was an incredible success with more than 35,000 participants. It proved that in Europe people want to get together, know each other and cross the boundaries of the over 27 countries with different languages.

Maker Faire is not an event that has to do strictly with people making hardware. For me it’s much more important because it opens up channels of communication between makers and the concept of making together. We are happy to show what makers can do and how they could collaborate toward a future of great open source projects and, later, bringing benefit to communities around the world.



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