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GPS is a global technology these days, with the Russian GLONASS system and the forthcoming European Galileo orbiting alongside the original US GPS satellites above our heads. [Florin Duroiu] decided to embrace globalism by forking the TinyGPS library for the Arduino platform to add support for these satellite constellations.

In addition to the GLONASS support, the new version of the venerable TinyGPS adds some neat new features by incorporating the NEMA 3.0 standard (warning: big-ass PDF link). Using this, you can extract interesting stuff such as the calculated position from each satellite constellation, the signal strength of each satellite and a lot more technical stuff about what the satellites are saying about you to your GPS receiver. [Florin] claims it is a drop-in replacement for TinyGPS that should require no rewriting. There is no support for Galileo just yet (as the satellites are still being launched: eight are in orbit now), but [Florin] is looking for help to add this, as well as the new Chinese BEIDOU system once it is operational.

(top image: artists’ view of a Galileo satellite in orbit, courtesy of ESA)


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Apr
09

Install Intel Galileo & Edison with the IDE Boards Manager

Announcements, arduino, ArduinoCertified, boards, edison, Featured, Galileo, IDE, Intel Edison, Intel Galileo Commenti disabilitati su Install Intel Galileo & Edison with the IDE Boards Manager 

Intel_core_post

We are very pleased to announce the availability of Intel® Galileo and Edison boards support with the Arduino IDE Boards Manager.

If you’ve already installed the Arduino IDE 1.6.3 (or newer), you are already set!

Just click on menu Tools > Board > Boards Manager to find both Galileo and Edison listed and available for download. Click on one of the list, then click Install. Wait a couple of minutes for the IDE to download and unpack all the needed tools and voilà: Board menu will list the Intel board of your choice.

 

150409_fotoBlogPost_550px

 

Feb
20

What time is it? Explore Galileo board’s real time clock tutorial

alarm clock, ArduinoCertified, clocks, Featured, Galileo, Intel Galileo, lasercut, tutorial Commenti disabilitati su What time is it? Explore Galileo board’s real time clock tutorial 

intel_blog_post

In the past weeks we explored how to make a gsm-controlled star light, a touch-screen controlled marionette, and how to learn more about Linux on Intel Galileo Gen 2.

In today’s tutorial  you’ll learn how to create a “Wake up clock” which will turn on and illuminate the room slowly, simulating a morning sunrise. And hopefully, it will make waking up on Mondays a bit easier!

This is the bill of materials:

Intel® Galileo Gen 2 power supply
Arduino Protoshield
LED power supply
1 High power white LED(3v 700mA)
1 1000 ?F Capacitor
1 2.1 mm DC jack-to-screw terminal adaptor
1 10k potentiometer

1 1.8Ohm 2w resistor
1 LM317t voltage regulator
2 10kOhm resistor
1 2n7000 transistor
1 Coin battery holder
Jumper wires
Colored wire
Pin header
1 8 mm magnet
Stiff wire (that is attracted to magnets)
Wood glue
Hot glue sticks
4 mm MDF components – lasercut according to drawing
Plexiglas components – lasercut according to drawing
Nuts and bolts
Rubberband

Download the files and learn how to assemble electronics at this link

Feb
14

Build a Touchscreen Controlled Marionette with Intel Galileo

ArduinoCertified, Galileo, Intel Galileo, lasercut, leds, servo, servo motor, tutorial Commenti disabilitati su Build a Touchscreen Controlled Marionette with Intel Galileo 

image00

Making gets really interesting and fun especially when mixing laser cut shapes, servo motor, tft screen, MDF, plexiglass and Intel Galileo Gen 2. After you assemble the parts and follow the steps of this tutorial, you’ll be able to control the puppet through an interface on the screen. Enjoy the tutorial!

We are going to have a little fun with the Intel® Galileo development board. This time around, we’ll make a simple puppet control system. We’ve put together a “running robot” marionette with a simple mechanism that uses a continuous servo. We’ll be use a touchscreen interface to control various outputs using sliders and switches.

As always, you can modify the designs to suit your needs. We will teach you how to incorporate touchscreens, and make the interface necessary for controlling the Intel® Galileo Gen 2 board.

Just so you know, the instructions this time around are quite long. That’s due to the assembly of the marionette. I would review the assembly instructions fully before attempting to put it together. While it looks long and complicated, if you group the parts, it much simpler.

So, let’s start the puppet show!

Follow the link and start making!

marionette

Feb
06

Time to explore Linux on Intel® Galileo Gen 2 – Tutorial

ArduinoCertified, Featured, Galileo, Intel Galileo, Linux Commenti disabilitati su Time to explore Linux on Intel® Galileo Gen 2 – Tutorial 

linux-galileo

The new tutorial we want to present you today is more like a guide giving you some basic information about the benefit of accessing Linux shell in Intel® Galileo Gen 2. It also shows you in which way the Intel® Galileo Gen 2 is not only an advanced, more powerful version of Arduino Uno that happens to be layered on top of a Linux system. There is definitely much more that can be done with it and the Linux shell: this tutorial is an entry point to explore it and learn how to:

– preparing a system image;
– accessing the shell in 4 different ways;
– examining the workflow of copying a python script into Intel® Galileo Gen 2 through scp (or pscp);
– running an Arduino sketch;
-retrieving files from Intel® Galileo Gen 2.

 

The Intel® Galileo Gen 2 includes much of the Arduino Uno’s functionality. Similar to an Uno, it can create a wide variety interactive objects that use input sensors and various outputs. After exploring the many possibilities of using the “Arduino part” of the  Intel® Galileo Gen 2 this way, one might start to wonder: what is the next step?

Perhaps you want to write more complex programs using your favorite scripting language like python or javascript. Maybe you’re interested in computer vision or want to have full control over the board and find out more about the inner workings. By accessing to the Linux core, all these will be possible to achieve.

This tutorial will cover the basics of working with Linux by making a simple program that logs button presses. While the example is not very useful, it will help familiarize you with Linux as applied to the Intel® Galileo Gen 2.

Follow the link and explore all the steps

Dic
19

GSM Controlled Star Light: A xmas tutorial for Intel Galileo

christmas, Featured, Galileo, gms, gsm, shield, wifi shield Commenti disabilitati su GSM Controlled Star Light: A xmas tutorial for Intel Galileo 

star-galileo

We recently posted on Intel Makers Community the first of a series of educational tutorial focused on Intel Galileo Gen 2. Our team worked on  a smart Christmas star able to receive sms and change pattern according to it. The bill of materials contains also an Arduino GSM Shield, a Proto Shield and some flexible  LED  strips:

To kick off a festive mood, we decided to adapt a typical Scandinavian tradition. In December, many people will decorate their homes by hanging large paper stars inside their windows. The stars usually have a single bulb inside that casts a warm, welcoming glow.

We thought we’d try to make this tradition a bit more merry by making it interactive. By sending text messages, we will change the blink pattern and color of the star.

This project is a fun and easy introduction on how to use the Intel Galileo Gen 2 board and the Arduino GSM shield. After making this tutorial, try modifying the code to change the patterns or taking the functions to insert GSM connectivity into your own projects.

Happy Holidays!

Follow the link and make it as well!

 

Ago
23

Galileo now runs Windows

arduino, Galileo, intel, PWM Commenti disabilitati su Galileo now runs Windows 

galileo2

by elektor.com:

Microsoft have released a non-commercial version of Windows based on Windows 8.1 to run on the Intel Galileo development board. A spokesperson for Microsoft said “This preview Windows image is another opportunity for makers and developers to create, generate new ideas and provide feedback to help Microsoft continue making Windows even better on this class of device”.

The board and OS are part of the Windows Developer Program for the IoT (Internet of Things) which Microsoft hopes will encourage developers of Internet-connected devices to experiment with Windows platforms. The Galileo kits include the standard Arduino Wiring API and a subset of the Win32 API. At the moment Linux is the OS of choice among makers and for the next generation of devices but Microsoft hopes to break that dominance. Intel released an update to the original Galileo Gen 1 board earlier this month which features an improved control of its PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) output signals to make the board better suited for the management of 3D printers and robotic applications. Galileo Gen 2 can also be powered from the Ethernet port which the earlier Gen 1 version did not allow.

Galileo now runs Windows - [Link]

Lug
15

Intel Announces 2nd Generation Galileo Development Board

arduino, Electronics, Galileo, intel Commenti disabilitati su Intel Announces 2nd Generation Galileo Development Board 

GalileioG2In late 2013, Intel launched Galileo, their Linux-powered, Arduino-compatible development board which runs on their silicon. Today, Intel officially announces the second generation of the Galileo development board, which was teased at MakerCon last May. “We’ve made a number of enhancements to the Intel Galileo board based on feedback from […]

Read more on MAKE

Mag
28

Real-time tinkering on Intel Galileo using a mobile device

arduino, ArduinoCertified, Galileo, Intel Galileo, mobile Commenti disabilitati su Real-time tinkering on Intel Galileo using a mobile device 

connectanything

If you are a beginner and want to start prototyping easily with  Intel Galileo, it could be fun to use ConnectAnyThing. It  makes it easy for novices to start tinkering in hardware before jumping into example code and the IDE but it’s also useful for experienced builders that want to try something out really quickly.

To get started, you will need:

  • Galileo (with updated firmware)
  • Wi-Fi card and antenna.  (Tested with Centrino n-135, n-6205, n-6235)
  • Micro SD card, 2gb up to 32gb capacity, with ConnectAnyThing loaded (instructions on github)

Download the latest release of ConnectAnyThing, follow the instructions and enjoy tinkering: on a webpage you’ll be able to  read inputs and control outputs in real-time from your mobile device!
connectanything

Apr
29

Make your lasercut datamonster with Intel Galileo

arduino, ArduinoCertified, datamonster, Galileo, Intel Galileo, sensors, servo motor Commenti disabilitati su Make your lasercut datamonster with Intel Galileo 

datamonster

Datamonsters are creatures that respond to you. They can see you and respond to your presence and movement. In addition to responding to immediate interactions, they can also be influenced by events happening in the world outside.

 

The project you see in the picture was made by Lucas Ainsworth  using Intel Galileo board and needs 3 main things:

- a physical structure
The physical structure uses commonly available materials and a relatively easy-to build wooden kit pattern, so that the physical form “gets out of the way”
as much as possible. If you cut this kit and put it together, you will have a robot with 5 joints: waist rotation, waist elevation, mid-body elevation, neck rotation, and head movement.

- sensing
For this version, we’re using 3 long range active IR sensors for simplicity and low cost. This sensor pack estimates object location in 3D space. Next gen could possibly use a webcam and OpenCV to include face-detection and motion in addition to presence.

- software
This is where the fun is and where the most work remains to be done. We have code for the Arduino IDE (written for the Intel Galileo board) that you
can use to calibrate and control your monster. If you use our code unchanged, you’ll have some basic reactions to objects, and a connection over WiFi to Thingspeak. Thingspeak is an easy-to-use repository for data collected from the internet or any data sources you create.

You can make your own Datamonster following the detailed documentation at this link. The Galileo code to get started (for the Arduino IDE) is on GitHub.

 

datamonster2



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