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Meet Cynthia Cho

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The post Maker Spotlight: Cynthia Cho appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Christmas light displays winking and flashing in sync to music are a surefire way to rack up views on YouTube and annoy your neighbours. Inspired by one such video, [Akshay James] set up his own display and catalogued the process in this handy tutorial to get you started on your own for the next holiday season.

[James], using the digital audio workstation Studio One, took the MIDI data for the song ‘Carol of the Bells’ and used that as the light controller data for the project’s Arduino brain. Studio One sends out the song’s MIDI data, handled via the Hairless MIDI to serial bridge, to the Arduino which in turn sets the corresponding bit to on or off. That gets passed along to three 74HC595 shift registers — and their three respective relay boards — which finally trigger the relay for the string of lights.

From there, it’s a matter of wiring up the Arduino shift register boards, relays, and connecting the lights. Oh, and be sure to mount a speaker outdoors so passers-by can enjoy the music:

Be sure to set up a secondary power source for the relays, as drawing the power from the Arduino is likely to cause big problems. If your preferred digital audio workstation doesn’t have a virtual MIDI instrument, [James] used loopMIDI for the desired effect. He has also provided the code he used to save you some trouble if you’re building this during an invariably hectic holiday season.

Of course, you could always plug your lights into an IoT power bar and have fun that way.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Holiday Hacks

10-plastic-pic-2This holiday season there are so many ways to customize your lights with DIY electronics.

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The post 10 Merry Circuits to Illuminate Your Holiday appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

10-plastic-pic-2This holiday season there are so many ways to customize your lights with DIY electronics.

Read more on MAKE

The post 10 Merry Circuits to Illuminate Your Holiday appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Well all know cellular automata from Conway’s Game of Life which simulates cellular evolution using rules based on the state of all eight adjacent cells. [Gavin] has been having fun playing with elementary cellular automata in his spare time. Unlike Conway’s Game, elementary automata uses just the left and right neighbors of a cell to determine the next cell ahead in the row. Despite this comparative simplicity, some really complex patterns emerge, including a Turing-complete one.

[Gavin] started off doing the calculations by hand for fun. He made some nice worksheets for this. As we can easily imagine, doing the calculations by hand got boring fast. It wasn’t long before his thoughts turned to automating his cellular automata. So, he put together an automatic cellular automator. (We admit, we are having a bit of fun with this.)

This could have been a quick software project but half the fun is seeing the simulations on a purpose-built ecosystem. The files to build the device are hosted on Thingiverse. Like other cellular automata projects, it uses LED matrices to display the data. An Arduino acts as the brain and some really cool retro switches from the world’s most ridiculously organized electronics collection finish the look of the project.

To use, enter the starting condition with the switches at the bottom. The code on the Arduino then computes and displays the pattern on the matrix. Pretty cool and way faster than doing it by hand.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, misc hacks

Akiba of Freaklabs helped design sequenced lighting like those used in the Wreaking Crew Orchestra shows.Akiba of Freaklabs helped design sequenced lighting like those used in the Wrecking Crew Orchestra shows

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The post How to Sequence LEDs to Music: A Tutorial by Freaklabs appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Screen Shot 2015-10-21 at 12.27.02 PMTrick-or-treaters are bound to get a thrill when you make this choreographed music and light display that plays each time your gate is opened.

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The post Choreograph a Music and Light Display for the Holiday appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Feb
05

Display Your City’s Emotional State with Illuminated Snow

alchemy, api, arduino, arduino hacks, christmas, ethernet, Holiday Hacks, holliday, LED, leds, lights, mood, sentiment, strip, twitter Commenti disabilitati su Display Your City’s Emotional State with Illuminated Snow 

[Hunter] wanted to do something a bit more interesting for his holiday lights display last year. Rather than just animated lights, he wanted something that was driven by data. In this case, his display was based on the mood of people in his city. We’ve seen a very similar project in the past, but this one has a few notable differences.

The display runs off of an Arduino. [Hunter] is using an Ethernet shield to connect the Arduino to the Internet. It then monitors all of the latest tweets from users within a 15 mile radius of his area. The tweets are then forwarded to the Alchemy Sentiment API for analysis. The API uses various algorithms and detection methods to identify the overall sentiment within a body of text. [Hunter] is using it to determine the general mood indicated by the text of a given tweet.

Next [Hunter] needed a way to somehow display this information. He opted to use an LED strip. Since the range of sentiments is rather small, [Hunter] didn’t want to display the overall average sentiment. This value doesn’t change much over short periods of time, so it’s not very interesting to see. Instead, he plots the change made since the last sample. This results in a more obvious change to the LED display.

Another interesting thing to note about this project is that [Hunter] is using the snow in his yard to diffuse the light from the LEDs. He’s actually buried the strip under a layer of snow. This has the result of hiding the electronics, but blurring the light enough so you can’t see the individual LEDs. The effect is rather nice, and it’s something different to add to your holiday lights display. Be sure to check out the video below for a demonstration.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Holiday Hacks
Dic
01

Control your Christmas lights with sms and Arduino Yún

arduino, Arduino Yún, christmas, Featured, lights, temboo, Yun Commenti disabilitati su Control your Christmas lights with sms and Arduino Yún 

arduinoLightsxmas

December is finally here and we can start thinking about indoor or outdoor decorations for the holiday. Christmas lights are an excellent way to light up any event and a user on instructables wanted to be able to control the lights remotely with text messages.

Check his 12-step tutorial  and take a look at the bill of materials:

  • An Arduino Yún – You could use another Arduino with a Wifi Shield though.
  • A Protoshield with (or without) a tiny breadboard
  • A regular breadboard will work as well, but will be less compact.
    If you want to solder more, you can just use a small circuit board instead.
  • A 5V relay
  • A piezo buzzer
  • Wires
  • A battery operated Christmas decoration (It’s not even Thanksgiving, so I’m using a Halloween decoration)
  • A Temboo account
  • A Twilio account

 

  • ArduinoYun-lights

Strobe Remote

If you want to take a photograph with a professional look, proper lighting is going to be critical. [Richard] has been using a commercial lighting solution in his studio. His Lencarta UltraPro 300 studio strobes provide adequate lighting and also have the ability to have various settings adjusted remotely. A single remote can control different lights setting each to its own parameters. [Richard] likes to automate as much as possible in his studio, so he thought that maybe he would be able to reverse engineer the remote control so he can more easily control his lighting.

[Richard] started by opening up the remote and taking a look at the radio circuitry. He discovered the circuit uses a nRF24L01+ chip. He had previously picked up a couple of these on eBay, so his first thought was to just promiscuously snoop on the communications over the air. Unfortunately the chips can only listen in on up to six addresses at a time, and with a 40-bit address, this approach may have taken a while.

Not one to give up easily, [Richard] chose a new method of attack. First, he knew that the radio chip communicates to a master microcontroller via SPI. Second, he knew that the radio chip had no built-in memory. Therefore, the microcontroller must save the address in its own memory and then send it to the radio chip via the SPI bus. [Richard] figured if he could snoop on the SPI bus, he could find the address of the remote. With that information, he would be able to build another radio circuit to listen in over the air.

Using an Open Logic Sniffer, [Richard] was able to capture some of the SPI communications. Then, using the datasheet as a reference, he was able to isolate the communications that stored information int the radio chip’s address register. This same technique was used to decipher the radio channel. There was a bit more trial and error involved, as [Richard] later discovered that there were a few other important registers. He also discovered that the remote changed the address when actually transmitting data, so he had to update his receiver code to reflect this.

The receiver was built using another nRF24L01+ chip and an Arduino. Once the address and other registers were configured properly, [Richard's] custom radio was able to pick up the radio commands being sent from the lighting remote. All [Richard] had to do at this point was press each button and record the communications data which resulted. The Arduino code for the receiver is available on the project page.

[Richard] took it an extra step and wrote his own library to talk to the flashes. He has made his library available on github for anyone who is interested.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, radio hacks


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