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Archive for the ‘alcohol’ Category

Big parties need a conversation piece, and what’s better than a drink-making robot? Not only is it a good conversation starter, it also frees up the party host who would normally be the bartender. It turned out that the drink robot was a really good idea. The Mai Tai recipe presented here […]

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The post Build a Simple Cocktail Drinkbot with Arduino appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Ott
18

MQ-3 Alcohol Sensor, Breakout Board + Arduino

adafruit, alcohol, alcohol sensor, arduino, Gas, gas sensor, sparkfun, tutorials Commenti disabilitati su MQ-3 Alcohol Sensor, Breakout Board + Arduino 

A lot has happened since our last article was published and to celebrate the continuance of bildr we’ll be playing with the MQ-3 Alcohol Gas Sensor. Coupled with the SparkFun Gas Sensor Breakout Board, connecting the MQ-3 to your Arduino is a breeze.

The MQ-3 is a heater-driven alcohol sensor that outputs an analog signal (usually interpreted somewhere between 150 and 1023 depending on how long you let the sensor warm up), which through the use of your Arduino code and calibration, can be interpreted for whatever use you need.

Putting The Pieces Together

When attaching your MQ-3 to the SparkFun Breakout Board, it should be noted that it doesn’t matter which way the MQ-3 alcohol sensor is pressed in. Both the A pins are electronically the same as well as the B pins. The center pins on both sides are the heater element pins. Since the circuit will be running on +5V DC it doesn’t matter which way the sensor is soldered to the board. As long as you have the SparkFun logos and pin labels facing downward, so you can still see them when the sensor is flipped over, you are good to go!

Note: Again, the MQ-3 is heater-driven so be aware that the sensor will become warm and may even emit a smell at first. This is completely normal.

Calibration: If you take your time, you can find out what values equate to specific percentages or even blood alcohol concentration in the case of a breathalyzer. You will of course need to calibrate your MQ-3 based on your specific Arduino code since sensor readings will vary. Although I can’t help with your specific calibration scenario, the best advice I can give you is to use several isopropyl alcohol bottles at different percentages for your testing. Do NOT get the sensor wet with alcohol! Simply squeeze to breathe the vapors of the alcohol into the sensor and take your readings.

mq3-arduino-hookup

Code

The Arduino code for this is very simple if you just want to view the raw data.

int mq3_analogPin = A0; // connected to the output pin of MQ3 

void setup(){
  Serial.begin(9600); // open serial at 9600 bps
}

void loop()
{
  // give ample warmup time for readings to stabilize

  int mq3_value = analogRead(mq3_analogPin);
  Serial.println(mq3_value);

  delay(100); //Just here to slow down the output.
}
Unless otherwise stated, this code is released under the MIT License – Please use, change and share it.
Ott
17

Interactive Boozeshelf is its own Dance Party

alcohol, arduino hacks, arduino mega, EEPROM, Infrared, led hacks, mosfet, RGB, RGB LED Commenti disabilitati su Interactive Boozeshelf is its own Dance Party 

boozeshelf

[Jeremy] refused to settle on your typical alcohol storage options, and instead created the Boozeshelf. Like most furniture hacks, the Boozeshelf began as a basic IKEA product, which [Jeremy] modified by cutting strips of wood to serve as wine glass holders and affixing the front end of a wine rack at the base to store bottles.

In its standard operating mode the Boozeshelf lies dark and dormant. Approaching it triggers a cleverly recessed ultrasonic sensor that gently illuminates some LEDs, revealing the shelf’s contents. When you walk away, then lights fade out. An Arduino Mega running [Jeremy's] custom LEDFader library drives the RGB LED strips, which he wired with some power MOSFETS to handle current demands.

[Jeremy] didn’t stop there, however, adding an additional IR receiver that allows him to select from three different RGB LED color modes: simple crossfading, individual shelf colors (saved to the on-board EEPROM), or the festive favorite: “Dance Party Mode.” Stick around after the break to see [Jeremy] in full aficionado attire demonstrating his Boozeshelf in a couple of videos. Considering blackouts are a likely result of enjoying this hack, we recommend these LED ice cubes for your safety.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, led hacks


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