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[Eric Dirgahayu] wanted to explore underwater with some sensors and cameras. First, he needed a platform to carry them. That led to his Arduino-controlled swimming fish. The fish is made from PVC and some waterproof servos. From the video (see below) it isn’t clear how much control the fish has, but it does swim with an undulating motion like a real fish.

The included software allows for infrared control (so clean water is a must) and there is a ballast tank for buoyancy. The site has several videos and tabs that show different aspects of the project. We found the site a little difficult to navigate, so to help you out, you can go straight to the interesting bits of the construction. Here’s the electronics, too.

If you need a home for your robot fish, we’ve seen plenty of high-tech tanks. If you prefer your submersibles a little more futuristic, you can always try Star Trek.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

aquaponics_MB_Make_03.13.2015Build this aquaponic garden to bring your veggies and your fish tank into perfectly sustainable harmony. Then use Arduino to take your set-up to the next level.

Read more on MAKE

The post Build an Aquaponic Garden with Arduino appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Feb
27

[Helios Labs] recently published version two of their 3D printed fish feeder. The system is designed to feed their fish twice a day. The design consists of nine separate STL files and can be mounted to a planter hanging above a fish tank in an aquaponics system. It probably wouldn’t take much to modify the design to work with a regular fish tank, though.

The system is very simple. The unit is primarily a box, or hopper, that holds the fish food. Towards the bottom is a 3D printed auger. The auger is super glued to the gear of a servo. The 9g servo is small and comes with internal limiters that only allow it to rotate about 180 degrees. The servo must be opened up and the limiters must be removed in order to enable a full 360 degree rotation. The servo is controlled by an Arduino, which can be mounted directly to the 3D printed case. The auger is designed in such a way as to prevent the fish food from accidentally entering the electronics compartment.

You might think that this project would use a real-time clock chip, or possibly interface with a computer to keep the time. Instead, the code simply feeds the fish one time as soon as it’s plugged in. Then it uses the “delay” function in order to wait a set period of time before feeding the fish a second time. In the example code this is set to 28,800,000 milliseconds, or eight hours. After feeding the fish a second time, the delay function is called again in order to wait until the original starting time.


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Arduino Hacks
Ott
22

DIY Automatic Fish Feeder Using Arduino Nano

aquarium, arduino, fish, Food & Beverage, General, Hacks Commenti disabilitati su DIY Automatic Fish Feeder Using Arduino Nano 

Yep, that’s a drill bit and it helps to deliver the right amount of food to your fish.The all in one automatic aquarium feeder uses an Arduino Nano and drill bit feed fish at certain time intervals. It doesn’t clean the tank or trim the plants but is immensely effective for feeding fish.

Read more on MAKE

Mag
29

Hooked On ‘Ponics

aquaponics, arduino, fish, garden, gardening, Maker Faire Commenti disabilitati su Hooked On ‘Ponics 

Screen Shot 2014-05-27 at 4.22.54 PMAGponics is an Arduino-controlled modular aquaponics system.

Read more on MAKE

Nov
16

Automated Aquarium is Kitchen-Sinky

aquarium, arduino hacks, arduino mega, fish, g5, home hacks, jquery, microcontrollers, PHP, Raspberry Pi, Raspi, servo Commenti disabilitati su Automated Aquarium is Kitchen-Sinky 

fishtankAutomation

People have been converting their old Power Macs and Mac G5s into fish tanks for a few years now, but [Hayden's] Internet-enabled tank is probably the most awesome ever crammed into an aquarium along with the water and the fish—and we’ve seen some fascinating builds this summer. After gutting the G5 and covering the basic acrylic work, [Hayden] started piling on the electronics: a webcam, timed LED lighting, an LCD for status readouts, filter and bubble control via a servo, an ultrasonic sensor to measure water levels, thermometer, scrolling matrix display, an automatic feeding mechanism, and more. He even snuck in the G5′s old mainboard solely for a cool backdrop.

The build uses both a Raspberry Pi and an Arduino Mega, which sit underneath the tank at the base. The Pi provides a web interface written in PHP and jQuery, which presents you with the tank’s status and allows changes to some settings. Nearly every component received some form of modification. [Hayden] stripped the webcam of its case and replaced the enclosure with a piece of acrylic and a mountain of silicone, making it both waterproof and slim enough to fit in the appropriate spot. Though he decided to stick with an Amazon-bought Eheim fish feeder, he disabled the unit’s autofeed timer and tapped in to the manual “feed” button to integrate it into his own system.

It’d take half of the front page to explain the rest of this thing. We’ve decided to let the aquarium tell you the rest of its features in the video below. Yeah…it can talk.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, home hacks, Microcontrollers, Raspberry Pi


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