Posts | Comments

Planet Arduino

Archive for the ‘dcf77’ Category

Lug
08

Arduino DCF77 Master Wall Clock

arduino, clock, dcf77 Commenti disabilitati su Arduino DCF77 Master Wall Clock 

FJMDPAHIBOX1RNU.MEDIUM

by oliverb @ instructables.com:

Time displayed on large 1″ (26mm) 7 segment displays with secondary 4×20 LCD information display. The clock can be used stand alone or provides the following pulses to drive slave clocks 1 sec alternating, 30 sec, 1 min , 1 hour, 24 hr, 15 min chime of quarter hours, hourly chime of hours.

An Arduino 328 Microprocessor is used to decode and display time & date from the DCF77 “Atomic” Clock in Mainflingen near Frankfurt Germany.
The DCF77 signal is decoded using the fantastic new DCF77 library written by Udo Klein meaning the clock stays in sync and keeps perfect time even with a massive amount of noise on the received DCF77 signal. Udo Klein’s DCF77 library also continually “Auto Tunes” the quartz crystal so in the rare event the signal can’t be decoded the clock remains accurate within 1 sec over many days.

Arduino DCF77 Master Wall Clock – [Link]

Gen
09

Binary Clock Would Make Doc Brown Proud

433MHz, arduino, arduino hacks, ATmega328, binary, binary clock, clock, dcf77, time Commenti disabilitati su Binary Clock Would Make Doc Brown Proud 

[Brett] was looking for a way to improve on an old binary clock project from 1996. His original clock used green LEDs to denote between a one or a zero. If the LED was lit up, that indicated a one. The problem was that the LEDs were too dim to be able to read them accurately from afar. He’s been wanting to improve on his project using seven segment displays, but until recently it has been cost prohibitive.

[Brett] wanted his new project to use 24 seven segment displays. Three rows of eight displays. To build something like this from basic components would require the ability to switch many different LEDs for each of the seven segment displays. [Brett] instead decided to make things easier by using seven segment display modules available from Tindie. These modules each contain eight displays and are controllable via a single serial line.

The clock’s brain is an ATmega328 running Arduino. The controller keeps accurate time using a DCF77 receiver module and a DCF77 Arduino library. The clock comes with three display modes. [Brett] didn’t want and physical buttons on his beautiful new clock, so he opted to use remote control instead. The Arduino is connected to a 433MHz receiver, which came paired with a small remote. Now [Brett] can change display modes using a remote control.

A secondary monochrome LCD display is used to display debugging information. It displays the time and date in a more easily readable format, as well as time sync information, signal quality, and other useful information. The whole thing is housed in a sleek black case, giving it a professional look.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Set
06

Very accurate master clock synchronized to the DCF77 time signal

arduino, bluetooth, clock, dcf77, ldr Commenti disabilitati su Very accurate master clock synchronized to the DCF77 time signal 

master_clock_16a

by embedded-lab.com:

Brett’s new masterclock is Arduino-controlled and keeps very accurate time by periodically synchronizing with the DCF77 “Atomic” Clock in Mainflingen near Frankfurt, Germany. The DCF77  library for Arduino is used to decode the time signal broadcasted from the atomic clock. The time is displayed as hours, minutes, and seconds on six 1″ seven segment LEDs. A 4×20 I2C LCD display is also used in the project to display additional info such as display brightness, sync information, signal quality, auto tune’d frequency, auto tuned quartz accuracy, etc. Both the displays are auto-dimmed based on the surrounding light intensity using an LDR sensor and pulse width modulation technique. His clock also includes a bluetooth link for updating the Arduino firmware from a PC without an USB cable.

Very accurate master clock synchronized to the DCF77 time signal - [Link]

Dic
07

DCF77 Powered Clock is a Work of Art

arduino, arduino hacks, clock, clock hacks, dcf77 Commenti disabilitati su DCF77 Powered Clock is a Work of Art 

[Brett] just completed his DCF77 Master Bracket Clock, intended to be a backup to an old logic controlled clock he made. For our readers that don’t know, DCF77 is a German longwave time signal whose transmitter is located near Frankfurt (Germany). Every minute, the current date and time are sent on the 77.5kHz carrier signal.

The result, which you can see above, is made using an Ikea lantern, a skeleton clock, an ATmega328 (for Arduino compatibility), a voice recording playback IC (ISD1730), a cheap 20×4 LCD display, a DCF77 receiver module, and many LEDs. We’re pretty sure that it must have taken [Brett] quite a while to get such a nice looking clock. In case the clock loses power from the power supply, 3 AA cells provide battery backup. On the firmware side, making the platform Arduino-compatible allowed [Brett] to use its libraries so the coding was quickly done. Embedded after a break is a video of the final result.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, clock hacks


  • Newsletter

    Sign up for the PlanetArduino Newsletter, which delivers the most popular articles via e-mail to your inbox every week. Just fill in the information below and submit.

  • Like Us on Facebook