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Archive for the ‘Touchpad’ Category

Phone screens keep getting bigger. Computer screens keep getting bigger. Why not a large trackpad to use as a mouse? [MaddyMaxey] had that thought and with a few components and some sewing skills created a trackpad in a tablecloth.

The electronics in this project are right off the shelf. A Flora board for the brains and 4 capacitive touch boards. If you haven’t seen the Flora, it is a circular-shaped Arduino made for sewing into things. The real interesting part is the construction. If you haven’t worked with conductive fabric and thread, this will be a real eye-opener. [Maddy’s] blog has a lot of information about her explorations into merging fabric and electronics and also covers things like selecting conductive thread.

As an optional feature, [MaddyMaxey] added vibration motors that provide haptic feedback to her touchpad. We were hoping for a video, but there doesn’t seem to be one. The code is just the example program for the capacitive sensor boards, although you can see in a screenshot the additions for the haptic motors.

We’ve covered the Flora before, by the way. You could also make a ridiculously large touch surface using tomography, although the resolution isn’t quite good enough for mouse purposes.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, wearable hacks
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TouchSynth – A high school senior project

arduino, arduino mega, Digital Audio Workstation, mega, synthesizer, Touchpad Commenti disabilitati su TouchSynth – A high school senior project 

touchsynth

Steve Mostovoy and his partner Tim Boy Jr, worked for over 9 months to  create a TouchSynth and share all the documentation about it.

touchsynth

 

It was hard but they learnt  a lot about how not to organize code, how to think in terms of data, and how many amazing things you can do on a 16MHz processor:

This project uses an Arduino Mega, a resistive touchpad, and an 8×8 LED matrix to create a simple digital audio workstation and synthesizer. You can compose and play songs in real time and use different types of sounds. It was a nine month process between me and my partner during our senior year of high school to create this. The result is a really nifty Arduino project that showcases the flexibility of Arduino devices, and it sounds good as well!

Take a look at the video to see how it works:



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