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Archive for the ‘guitar pedal’ Category

Normally guitar pedals take in a signal from your instrument, then some modification to an amplifier. ElectroSmash’s open source device, however, looks like a guitar pedal, connects to a guitar and amp like a guitar pedal, but actually leaves the signal unmodified. Instead, it displays a variety of info about what you’re playing on its 16 x 16 LED matrix.

The Arduino Audio Meter uses an Uno for control and analysis, and acts as a VU meter by reading the incoming audio and creating LED animations. It also features a tuner function, visual metronome, frequency detector, and a simple lamp, which could all certainly be useful when playing. 

User input (besides the1/4-inch audio jack) is via a potentiometer and encoder, and it even has a few games available for it if you need to blow off some steam between sets! Build kits are available here if you’d like to make your own.

Over the summer [ElectroSmash] put the finishing touches on the Arduino Audio Meter, a shield for the Arduino Uno that visualizes various aspects of an incoming audio signal on a set of four 8×8 LED dot matrices. Obsentisibly it’s for use on a guitar pedalboard, but thanks to the incredible documentation and collection of example code provided by the team, the project promises to be an excellent platform for all sorts of audio experimentation.

Incoming audio is amplified with an MCP6002 and fed into the Uno’s Analog to Digital Converter, where it’s processed via whatever Sketch the user has uploaded. User input is provided by a digital encoder with push-button. A set of four MAX7219 chips control the entire 256-pixel matrix with just three pins on the Arduino. The resolution of the display allows the Arduino Audio Meter to show more than just a simple VU meter, it can even do text and basic graphics.

[ElectroSmash] provides various Sketches for use with the Arduino Audio Meter that provide the expected repertoire of audio visualizations, but they also provide a number of interesting Sketches to expand the capabilities of the device in unexpected ways. Some of them could be useful for a stage musician, such a tool to tune your guitar, whereas others are fun uses of the hardware such as a game of “Snake”.

With the entire project released as open source, users are free to run wild with the Arduino Audio Meter. Writing your own custom software is an obvious first step to making the project your own, but adding additional hardware features and functions certainly aren’t out of the question either.

Our very own [Lewin Day] once walked us through the effort involved in building boutique guitar pedals, and while the Audio Audio Meter’s capabilities are somewhat limited as it doesn’t have the ability to change the audio going through it, we’re still interested in seeing what the community will come up with once they have an easy way to bring their ideas to life.

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Program sound effects for your guitar with pedalSHIELD

arduino, arduino due, DUE, guitar pedal, shield Commenti disabilitati su Program sound effects for your guitar with pedalSHIELD 

pedalshield

pedalSHIELD by Electrosmash, is a programmable Arduino open-source guitar pedal made for guitarists, hackers and programmers. It plugs into an Arduino Due and allows you to program effects in C/C++ or download ready effects from the online library.

pedalshield diagram

It is designed to be a platform to learn about digital signal processing, effects, synthesizers and experiment without deep knowledge in electronics or programming.

See all the specs on their website, including  a custom 3D printed cover available in several colors!

pedalShield

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pedalshield

If you’re a guitarist, or know a guitarist, you probably know just how many guitar effects there are out there — but what if you could design your own effects?

[J Rodriguez] has just released his opensource Arduino guitar pedal shield, dubbed the pedalSHIELD. He designed it as a platform to learn about digital signal processing, effects, and synthesizers — without needing an in-depth knowledge of electronics or programming. It allows you to design your own effects in C/C++, or download from his own library online. Some of the downloadable presets include an octave pedal, reverb pedals, delay pedals, and even distortion pedals!

The pedal features three programmable potentiometers, two main switches, and the foot pedal switch. The shield plugs directly into an Arduino Due, and you can find all the schematics here and the parts list here. It was completely designed in KiCad which is an open source electronics CAD design suite.

Take a listen after the break to hear the pedal in action!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, musical hacks


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