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We’re kicking off this year’s CES with some big news.

Millions of users and thousands of companies across the world already use Arduino as an innovation platform, which is why we have drawn on this experience to enable enterprises to quickly and securely connect remote sensors to business logic within one simple IoT application development platform: a new solution for professionals in traditional sectors aspiring for digital transformation through IoT. 

Combining a low-code application development platform with modular hardware makes tangible results possible in just one day. This means companies can build, measure, and iterate without expensive consultants or lengthy integration projects.

Built on ARM Pelion technology, the latest generation of Arduino solutions brings users simplicity of integration and a scalable, secure, professionally supported service. 

By combining the power and flexibility of our production ready IoT hardware with our secure, scalable and easy to integrate cloud services we are putting in the hands of our customers something really disruptive,” commented Arduino CEO Fabio Violante. “Among the millions of Arduino customers, we’ve even seen numerous businesses transform from traditional ‘one off’ selling to subscription-based service models, creating new IoT-based revenue streams with Arduino as the enabler. The availability of a huge community of developers with Arduino skills is also an important plus and gives them the confidence to invest in our technology”.  

But that’s not all. At CES 2020, we are also excited to announce the powerful, low-power new Arduino Portenta family. Designed for demanding industrial applications, AI edge processing and robotics, it features a new standard for open high-density interconnect to support advanced peripherals. The first member of the family is the Arduino Portenta H7 module – a dual-core Arm Cortex-M7 and Cortex-M4 running at 480MHz and 240MHz, respectively, with industrial temperature-range (-40 to 85°C) components. The Portenta H7 is capable of running Arduino code, Python and JavaScript, making it accessible to an even broader audience of developers.

The new Arduino Portenta H7 is now available for pre-order on the Arduino online store, with an estimated delivery date of late February 2020.

We’re kicking off this year’s CES with some big news.

Millions of users and thousands of companies across the world already use Arduino as an innovation platform, which is why we have drawn on this experience to enable enterprises to quickly and securely connect remote sensors to business logic within one simple IoT application development platform: a new solution for professionals in traditional sectors aspiring for digital transformation through IoT. 

Combining a low-code application development platform with modular hardware makes tangible results possible in just one day. This means companies can build, measure, and iterate without expensive consultants or lengthy integration projects.

Built on ARM Pelion technology, the latest generation of Arduino solutions brings users simplicity of integration and a scalable, secure, professionally supported service. 

By combining the power and flexibility of our production ready IoT hardware with our secure, scalable and easy to integrate cloud services we are putting in the hands of our customers something really disruptive,” commented Arduino CEO Fabio Violante. “Among the millions of Arduino customers, we’ve even seen numerous businesses transform from traditional ‘one off’ selling to subscription-based service models, creating new IoT-based revenue streams with Arduino as the enabler. The availability of a huge community of developers with Arduino skills is also an important plus and gives them the confidence to invest in our technology”.  

But that’s not all. At CES 2020, we are also excited to announce the powerful, low-power new Arduino Portenta family. Designed for demanding industrial applications, AI edge processing and robotics, it features a new standard for open high-density interconnect to support advanced peripherals. The first member of the family is the Arduino Portenta H7 module – a dual-core Arm Cortex-M7 and Cortex-M4 running at 480MHz and 240MHz, respectively, with industrial temperature-range (-40 to 85°C) components. The Portenta H7 is capable of running Arduino code, Python and JavaScript, making it accessible to an even broader audience of developers.

The new Arduino Portenta H7 is now available for pre-order on the Arduino online store, with an estimated delivery date of late February 2020.

While the Arduino has a very vocal fan club, there are always a few people less than thrilled with the ubiquitous ecosystem. While fans may just dismiss it as sour grapes, there are a few legitimate complaints you can fairly level at the stock setup. To address at least some of those concerns, Arduino is rolling out the Arduino Pro IDE and while it doesn’t completely address every shortcoming, it is worth a look and may grow to quiet down some of the other criticisms, given time.

For the record, we think the most meaningful critiques fall into three categories: 1) the primitive development environment, 2) the convoluted build system, and 3) the lack of debugging. Of course, there are third party answers for all of these problems, but now the Pro IDE at least answers the first one. As far as we can tell, the IDE hides the build process just like the original IDE. Debugging, though, will have to wait for a later build.

We were happy to see a few things with the new IDE. There’s some autocompletion support, Git is integrated, and there’s still our old friend the serial monitor. The system still uses the Arduino CLI, so that means there isn’t much danger of the development getting out of sync. The actual editor is Eclipse Theia. People typically either love Eclipse or hate it, however, it is at least a credible editor. However, Theia uses Electron which makes many people unhappy because Electron applications typically eat a lot of resources. We’ll have to see how taxing using the new Pro IDE is on typical systems with normal workloads.

On the future feature list is our number one pick: debugging. They are also promising support for new languages, third party plugins, and synchronization with the Web-based editor. All good features.

This is just an alpha preview release, but it is a great start. Our only question is will existing users really care? Most people already write code in another editor. Many use an external build system like PlatformIO. Eclipse already has a plug in for Arduino that supports debugging with the right hardware. So while new users may appreciate the features, advanced users may be wondering why this is so late to the party.

 

Rain barrels are a great way to go green, as long as your neighborhood doesn’t frown upon them. [NikonUser]’s barrel sits up high enough that he has to climb up on an old BBQ and half-dangle from the pipe to check the water level, all the while at the risk of encountering Australian spiders.

Arachnophobia, it turns out, is a great motivator. At first, [NikonUser] dreamed up a solar-powered IoT doodad that would check the level and report the result on a web page. He battled the Feature Creep and decided to build a handheld device that pings the water level with an ultrasonic sensor and displays it on a 7-segment.

Everything is contained in a water-resistant box and driven by an Arduino Pro. The box is mounted on a piece of scrap lumber that lays across the top of the barrel. This allows the HC-SR04’s eyes to peer over the edge and send pings toward the bottom. It also helps to keep the readings consistent and the electronics from taking a swim.

Operation is simple: [NikonUser] reaches up, sets the plank across the barrel, and pushes the momentary. This activates the Arduino, which prompts the HC-SR04 to take several readings. The code averages these readings, does a little math, and displays the percentage of water remaining in the barrel.

Interested in harvesting rain water, but not sure what to do with it? You can use it for laundry, pour it in the toilet tank instead of flushing, or make an automated watering system for your garden.

Set
12

DIY Arduino Mini BMO

Accelerometer, arduino, Arduino Pro, LCD, Nokia 3310 LCD, Sensor Commenti disabilitati su DIY Arduino Mini BMO 

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by fileark @ electronhacks.com:

BMO from Comedy Central’s Adventure Time is adorable, if only someone would make one that can walk! Atleast we can make one with a personality. Here is a build using easy to get parts including Arduino Pro  Mini, Nokia 3310 LCD screen, audio playback, accelerometers, and distance sensors.

The parts added up to around $70.00

DIY Arduino Mini BMO - [Link]

Mag
03

Arduino pro mini undershield

arduino, Arduino Pro, arduino pro mini, ATmega328, LM2940 Commenti disabilitati su Arduino pro mini undershield 

pro-mini-undershield-2-600x400

Bajdi blogged about his Arduino pro mini undershield:

I’ve designed another PCB :) This time it’s a simple undershield for the Arduino pro mini. I received the PCB’s from Electrodragon (12$ for 10PCB’s) last week. The PCB has a schottky diode and a 5V linear regulator, I’m using an LM2940 5V regulator. For the rest there are just 2 rows of female headers to plug the pro mini in and 3 rows of male pins on each side.
The reason I’ve had this PCB made is that pro mini’s are dirt cheap these days, you can find them on Ebay or Chinese shops for mess then 4$. That makes them the cheapest Arduino on the internet. It’s cheaper and easier to buy a pro mini and integrate it in to your own project then to design your own PCB with an ATmega328.

[via]

Arduino pro mini undershield - [Link]

Apr
07

Arduino-Controlled Marquee Arrow Points the Way to Whatever You Like

arduino christmas lights, arduino hacks, Arduino Pro, Christmas Lights, MC3042, ssr Commenti disabilitati su Arduino-Controlled Marquee Arrow Points the Way to Whatever You Like 

Reader [pscmpf] really digs the scrolling light look of old marquee signs and as soon as he saw some Christmas lights with G40 bulbs, he was on his way to creating his own vintage-look marquee arrow.

We must agree that those bulbs really do look like old marquee lights or small vanity globes. [pscmpf] started by building, varnishing, and distressing the wooden box to display the lights and house the electronics. He controls the lights with an Arduino Pro and an SSR controller board. The 24 lights are divided into ten sections; each of these has its own solid-state relay circuit built around an MC3042 as the opto-coupler, with a power supply he made from a scrap transformer.

[pscmpf] shares some but not all of his code as it is pretty long. There are five patterns that each play at three different speeds in addition to a continuous ‘on’ state. In his demonstration video after the jump, he runs through all the patterns using a momentary switch. This hack proves that Arduino-controlled Christmas lights are awesome year-round.

 

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Mar
31

Dr. Frankenstein’s Wireless Xbox One Steering Wheel

arduino hacks, Arduino Pro, simraceway SRW-S1, xbox hacks, xbox one Commenti disabilitati su Dr. Frankenstein’s Wireless Xbox One Steering Wheel 

Buy an Xbox One controller and hack it immediately? That’s exactly what [tEEonE] did so he could merge it with a Simraceway SRW-S1 steering wheel. He loves racing games and was psyched to play Forza 5. He already had the steering wheel, but it’s strictly a PC peripheral. [tEEonE] wanted the wheel to control the steering, gas, and brakes and found both the XB1 controller and the SRW-S1 well-suited to the hack.

For steering, [tEEonE] substituted the SRW-S1′s accelerometer for the XB1′s left joystick pot. He connected the X and Y to analog pins on an Arduino Pro. Then he mapped the rotation angles to voltage levels using a DAC and wired that to the XB1 joystick output. The XB1 controller uses Hall effect sensors and magnets on the triggers to control the gas and brake. He removed these and wired the SRW-S1 paddles to their outputs and the XB1 controller is none the wiser.

He also rigged up a 3-point control system to control the sensitivity and calibrate the angles: a button to toggle through menu items and two touch modules to increment and decrement the value. These he wired up to a feedback interface made by reusing a 15-LED strip from the SRW-S1. Finally, he had space left inside the housing for the XB1′s big rumble motors and was able to attach the small motors to the gas and brake paddles with the help of some 3-D printed attachments. Check out this awesome hack in action after the break.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, xbox hacks


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