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MKR1000Contest

Good news everyone. Due to many requests from our community we agreed to extend the contest to January 31st 2016.

You have some more days to submit your ideas to the World’s Largest Arduino Maker Challenge,  win one of the one thousand Arduino and Genuino MKR1000 and a fully-funded (up to $1,500) trip to Maker Faire Shenzhen, New York, Bay Area or Rome; a chance to present your creation at the Microsoft and the Arduino & Genuino booths; a professional video production of you and your creation; and a whopping $500 gift certificate to Adafruit.

Watch Massimo Banzi’s video presenting the contest.

Keep dreaming new ideas and have fun!

MkaerChallenge

thumbnail

We are excited to announce Arduino Wifi Shield 101 developed with Atmel is now available for purchase on the Arduino Store US (49.90$).

Arduino WiFi Shield 101 is a powerful IoT shield with crypto-authentication that connects your Arduino or Genuino board to the internet wirelessly. Connecting it to a WiFi network is simple, no further configuration in addition to the SSID and the password are required. The WiFI library allows you to write sketches which connect to the internet using the shield.

The shield is based on the Atmel SmartConnect-WINC1500 module, compliant with the IEEE 802.11 b/g/n standard. The WINC1500 module provided is a network controller capable of both TCP and UDP protocols.  The main feature is an hardware encryption/decryption security protocol provided by the ATECC508A CryptoAuthentication chip that is an ultra secure method to provide key agreement for encryption/decryption, specifically designed for the IoT market.

Last year, Massimo Banzi introduced the shield:

“In this increasingly connected world, the Arduino Wi-Fi Shield 101 will help drive more inventions in the IoT market. Expanding our portfolio of Arduino extensions, this new shield can flawlessly connect to any modern Arduino board giving our community more options for connectivity, along with added security elements to their creative projects.”

The WiFi Shield 101 is the first Arduino product fully supporting SSL and all the communication between your board and our secured server. With the power of the Arduino Zero and the WiFi Shield 101 it is possible to make secure IoT applications simply and just using the Arduino Language.

A working example and instructions on how to get started are available on Arduino Cloud, a work-in-progress project that gives you access to a pre-configured MQTT server for your IoT sketches using only your Arduino account. More examples and features will be available in the next months.

Feel like knowing more about the shield? Explore the  Getting Started guide.

Giu
06

From robotics to learning by doing

arduino, Arduino Robot, competition, education, Featured, Kids, Robots, video Commenti disabilitati su From robotics to learning by doing 

nerea
Creative Mornings is a series of talks given by creative types all over the world and recorded for everyone to see online.

Last May, 22-year-old Nerea de la Riva Iriepa, one of the worlds most promising young talents in Robotics gave an inspiring talk about her journey in the world of robotics, her discovery of Arduino, how to work in team and also how to deal with a male-dominated robot world.

robot-prototypes

She is currently student of Electronic Communications at the University of Alcalá in Madrid and also an intern at Arduino in Malmö where she is creating educational content for beginners and finding ways to make coding easier for young users.

robotics-kids

Mar
12

Hack the Arduino Robot: the results are impressive! (And you can vote them)

Announcements, arduino, Arduino Robot, competition, Robot, RSComponents Commenti disabilitati su Hack the Arduino Robot: the results are impressive! (And you can vote them) 

Hackrobot

During the last months we’ve been involved with RS components in launching the “Hack the Arduino Robot” competition. It has been a bit of a special competition where people would participate by posting their ideas and a committee of experts would choose which could be the most interesting challenges for the Arduino Robot to perform.

I was part of the committee and I am pleased to say that I am not disappointed. The level of the projects is in general pretty impressive, specially considering the amount of time they had to put into making something innovative. I am really thrilled about getting to know which team will be the one voted as the final winner of the challenge, I have my favorites, but I will not say publicly.

I think everyone should look at the videos just to see that robots can be so much more than whatever it is we conceptualized them for.

hackcompetition

Now it’s time to express your vote too: the likes of the videos on the playlist will be counted until 23rd of March 2014. The project with the most likes wins the community award!

Gen
22

“Hack the Arduino Robot”: join the competition!

Announcements, arduino, challenge, competition, Robot, vienna Commenti disabilitati su “Hack the Arduino Robot”: join the competition! 

HackTheArduinoRobot

 

RobotChallenge is an international championship for self-made, autonomous, and mobile robots taking place in Vienna (Austria) since 2004. Each year robots compete in different competitions – Robot Sumo, Line Follower, Air Race, Humanoid Sprint, Puck Collect and Freestyle . This year RobotChallenge in cooperation with Arduino and RS Components presents a new open source competition called:  ”Hack the Arduino Robot!”.

If you like robot and feel like you could hack the Arduino Robot in a great way, submit a short description of your project idea (up to 120 words) before the 26th of January responding to the following questions:

  • What would you do with an Arduino Robot?
  • What makes your idea special?
  • What real life problem does your robot solve?

An international jury will select the 10 best project ideas based on feasibility, creativity and innovation.

The selected teams will receive a brand new Arduino Robot for free to implement their project ideas and are invited to present their robots at RobotChallenge 2014 on 29th and 30th of March.

Open source is all about sharing with the community: Therefore each team has to document their project online and submit a short video (3 – 5 minutes) by the 23rd of February.

What about the Prizes? They are donated by RS Components which will  award the winners in two categories:

  • Best project & documentation Award
  • Community Award.

Read the details in PDF

Ott
24

Freetronics OLED Display Competition Winner

competition, freetronics, tronixstuff Commenti disabilitati su Freetronics OLED Display Competition Winner 

In September we published a review of the new Freetronics OLED Display module for Arduino and Raspberry Pi, and inside that review was the details for a simple competition – send in a postcard to go in the draw for a free OLED display. Today marks the end of the competition, so we’ve put all the cards in a box, shuffled them around a bit and selected one winner:

postcard_OLED_winner

Congratulations to Jorge from Portugal. Thanks to all those who entered, and for the curious here are the submitted cards:

postcards_OLED_all

Personally I’d like to thank all those who enjoyed the spirit of the competition and sent in a card, and of course Freetronics for the OLED Display:

freetronics OLED

We hope to run more competitions in the future and also offer product discounts for our readers – so be sure to read all of a post when they appear. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

 

The post Freetronics OLED Display Competition Winner appeared first on tronixstuff.

Ago
07

Freetronics CUBE4: RGB LED Cube Competition Winner

competition, freetronics, tronixstuff Commenti disabilitati su Freetronics CUBE4: RGB LED Cube Competition Winner 

In June we published a review of the Freetronics CUBE4: RGB LED Cube kit, and inside that review was the details for a simple competition – send in a postcard to go in the draw for a free kit. So today we’ve put all the cards in a box, shuffled them around a bit and selected one winner:

winnersmall

Thanks to all those who entered, and for the curious here are the submitted cards:

entrantssmall

Personally I’d like to thank all those who enjoyed the spirit of the competition and sent in a card. I’ve always wanted to visit Germany and from the look of the postcards, now Utah looks good as well. We’ll contact the winning participant by email.

We hope to run more competitions in the future and also offer product discounts for our readers – so be sure to read all of a post when they appear. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

 

The post Freetronics CUBE4: RGB LED Cube Competition Winner appeared first on tronixstuff.

Introduction

For those of you prototyping with larger Atmel AVR microcontrollers such as the ATmega32, it can be inconvenient to continually assemble a circuit onto a solderless breadboard that includes power, programming header and a few basics – or you might want to create a one-off product without waiting for a PCB to be made. If these are issues for you, or you’re interested in working with AVRs  then the subject of this review may be of interest – the ATmega32 Development Kit from Protostack. The kit is one of a range that spans from the ATmega8, and gives you almost everything needed to work with the microcontroller. We’ve assembled and experimented with the ATmega32 kit, so read on to find out more.

Assembly

The kit arrives in a typical anti-static package with the contents and URL on the front:

packaging

The PCB is large, measuring 127 x 94 mm, made from heavy 1.6 mm FR4 PCB and all the holes are through-plated. And as you can see from the images below, there’s plenty of prototyping space and power/GND rails:

pcbtop

pcbbottom

The included parts allow you to add a power supply, polyfuse, smoothing capacitors for the power, programmer socket, external 16 MHz crystal, a DC socket, IC socket, a lonely LED and of course the ATmega32A (which is a lower-power version of the ATmega32):

parts

You can download the user guide from the product page, which details the board layout, schematic and so on. When soldering the parts in, just start with the smallest-profile parts first and work your way up. There’s a few clever design points, such as power regulator – there’s four holes so you can use both “in-GND-output” and “GND-output-input” types:

igo

… and the layout of the prototyping areas resemble that of a solderless breadboard, and the power/GND rails snake all around – so transferring projects won’t be difficult at all:

protoarea

If you need to connect the AVcc to Vcc, the components and board space are included for a low-pass filter:

lowpass

And if you get carried away and need to use two or more boards at once – they’re stackable:

stacking

Moving forward

After assembling the board and inserting the ATmega32, you can use an AVR programmer to check it’s all working (and of course program it). With a 10-pin interface USBASP inserted, I headed over to the AVRdude folder on my PC and entered:

avrdude -c usbasp -p m32

which (as all was well) resulted with:

avrdudetest

Awesome – it’s nice to have something that just works. Let the experimenting begin!

Competition

Would you like the chance to win a kit? It’s easy. Clearly print your email address on a postcard, and mail it to:

Protostack Competition, PO Box 5435, Clayton 3168, Australia

Entries must be received by the 4th of  August 2013. One postcard will then be drawn at random, and the winner will receive one ATmega32 kit delivered by Australia Post standard air mail. You can enter as many times as you like. We’re not responsible for customs or import duties, VAT, GST, postage delays, non-delivery or whatever walls your country puts up against receiving inbound mail.

Conclusion

It’s a solid kit, the PCB is solid as a rock, and it worked. However it could really have used some spacers or small rubber feet to keep the board off the bench. Otherwise the kit is excellent, and offers a great prototyping area to work with your projects. If you order some, Protostack have a maximum delivery charge of $9 so you won’t get burned on delivery to far-flung places.  Larger photos available on flickr. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

Please note that the ATMEGA32A Development Kit in this review is a promotional consideration from Protostack.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.


Introduction

For those of you prototyping with larger Atmel AVR microcontrollers such as the ATmega32, it can be inconvenient to continually assemble a circuit onto a solderless breadboard that includes power, programming header and a few basics – or you might want to create a one-off product without waiting for a PCB to be made. If these are issues for you, or you’re interested in working with AVRs  then the subject of this review may be of interest – the ATmega32 Development Kit from Protostack. The kit is one of a range that spans from the ATmega8, and gives you almost everything needed to work with the microcontroller. We’ve assembled and experimented with the ATmega32 kit, so read on to find out more.

Assembly

The kit arrives in a typical anti-static package with the contents and URL on the front:

packaging

The PCB is large, measuring 127 x 94 mm, made from heavy 1.6 mm FR4 PCB and all the holes are through-plated. And as you can see from the images below, there’s plenty of prototyping space and power/GND rails:

pcbtop

pcbbottom

The included parts allow you to add a power supply, polyfuse, smoothing capacitors for the power, programmer socket, external 16 MHz crystal, a DC socket, IC socket, a lonely LED and of course the ATmega32A (which is a lower-power version of the ATmega32):

parts

You can download the user guide from the product page, which details the board layout, schematic and so on. When soldering the parts in, just start with the smallest-profile parts first and work your way up. There’s a few clever design points, such as power regulator – there’s four holes so you can use both “in-GND-output” and “GND-output-input” types:

igo

… and the layout of the prototyping areas resemble that of a solderless breadboard, and the power/GND rails snake all around – so transferring projects won’t be difficult at all:

protoarea

If you need to connect the AVcc to Vcc, the components and board space are included for a low-pass filter:

lowpass

And if you get carried away and need to use two or more boards at once – they’re stackable:

stacking

Moving forward

After assembling the board and inserting the ATmega32, you can use an AVR programmer to check it’s all working (and of course program it). With a 10-pin interface USBASP inserted, I headed over to the AVRdude folder on my PC and entered:

avrdude -c usbasp -p m32

which (as all was well) resulted with:

avrdudetest2

Awesome – it’s nice to have something that just works. Let the experimenting begin!

Conclusion

It’s a solid kit, the PCB is solid as a rock, and it worked. However it could really have used some spacers or small rubber feet to keep the board off the bench. Otherwise the kit is excellent, and offers a great prototyping area to work with your projects. If you order some, Protostack have a maximum delivery charge of $9 so you won’t get burned on delivery to far-flung places.  Larger photos available on flickr. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

LEDborder

Please note that the ATMEGA32A Development Kit in this review is a promotional consideration from Protostack.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Kit review – Protostack ATmega32 Development Kit appeared first on tronixstuff.

Mag
14

April 2012 Competition Results

arduino, competition, display, DMD, dot, freetronics, giveaway, matrix, modules, Sensor, tronixstuff Commenti disabilitati su April 2012 Competition Results 

Competition over.

The post April 2012 Competition Results appeared first on tronixstuff.



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