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Archive for the ‘3D printing’ Category

barmixvahIf you’d like a “cool refreshing drink,” but don’t really feel like mixing it yourself, why not just build a robot to do it for you? It might not save time in the long run (I seriously hope not), but as creator Yu Jiang Tham notes, “It’s great fun at […]

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tach1aNot satisfied with the stock tachometer on your car? You could buy an aftermarket kit, but for something truly unique, Pete Mills decided to design and build his own. He calls his creation “blueShift,” which, although possibly optimistic about the speed he will be able to achieve in his Ford […]

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glass-feat13 year old Clay Haight made his own wearable smart glasses, inspired by Google Glass and the pages of Make: magazine.

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rabbit h1

[Dave] has some big plans to build himself a 1980′s style computer. Most of the time, large-scale projects can be made easier by breaking them down into their smaller components. [Dave] decided to start his project by designing and constructing a custom controller for his future computer. He calls it the Rabbit H1.

[Dave] was inspired by the HOTAS throttle control system, which is commonly used in aviation. The basic idea behind HOTAS is that the pilot has a bunch of controls built right into the throttle stick. This way, the pilot doesn’t ever have to remove his hand from the throttle. [Dave] took this basic concept and ran with it.

He first designed a simple controller shape in OpenSCAD and printed it out on his 3D printer. He tested it out in his hand and realized that it didn’t feel quite right. The second try was more narrow at the top, resulting in a triangular shape. [Dave] then found the most comfortable position for his fingers and marked the piece with a marker. Finally, he measured out all of the markings and transferred them into OpenSCAD to perfect his design.

[Dave] had some fun with OpenSCAD, designing various hinges and plywood inlays for all of the buttons. Lucky for [Dave], both the 3D printer software as well as the CNC router software accept STL files. This meant that he was able to design both parts together in one program and use the output for both machines.

With the physical controller out of the way, it was time to work on the electronics. [Dave] bought a couple of joysticks from Adafruit, as well as a couple of push buttons. One of the joysticks controls the mouse cursor. The other joystick controls scrolling vertically and horizontally, and includes a push button for left-click. The two buttons are used for middle and right-click. All of these inputs are read by a Teensy Arduino. The Teensy is compact and easily capable of emulating a USB mouse, which makes it perfect for this job.

[Dave] has published his designs on Thingiverse if you would like to try to build one of these yourself.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
moduloWhen Evil Ninja Monster Ballerinas attack - ModULO can save the day! Build this 3D printed robot action figure for yourself.

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cirko_sq-rbweCome and make this mean, green, robotic machine ... make it laugh and make it sing!

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Mopsey the MonsterbotWhat can this bot do? What do you want it to do?

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OpenKnit-01In a lot of ways hand-knitting can be seen as the original form of 3D printing, so it makes perfect sense that artist and designer Gerard Rubio, with some help from Knitic creators Mar Canet and Varvara Guljajeva, made this incredible open-source knitting machine called OpenKnit.

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OpenKnit-01Makers create an open-source, low cost , digital fabrication tool that creates bespoke clothing from digital files.

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bebackAt work, I often use a Post-it note stating my whereabouts on my office door for those who stop by looking for me when I am out. Some notes are one-time use like “On vacation. Back on 11/20.”, and some can be reused like “Up in the 3113 lab.” Sometimes, […]

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