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Materia101

After the sneak peak of some days ago, we are happy to officially announce the Arduino 3d printer . Completely open source and affordable, Arduino Materia 101 (more pics) is a device aiming at simplifying access to the world of 3D printing and rapid prototyping.

Materia 101 is a precision 3D printer running on Arduino Mega, designed and developed in Italy, thanks to the collaboration of Arduino and Sharebot, two companies working with a similar approach to technology. It is ideal for beginners, makers and education.

Materia 101’s visual identity is curated by studio ToDo: the choice of essentiality of design and the white color of the machine suggests its ease of use.

The printer will be available only on the Arduino Store both as a kit and pre-assembled. Official pricing of the device will be disclosed at a later date but the kit will sell for less than 600 EUR/800 USD, while the pre-assembled version will be available for less than 700 EUR/1000 USD.
The official presentation will be held during Maker Faire Rome, 3-5 October 2014. 

Technical characteristics:
Printing technology: Fused Filament Fabrication
Printing area: 140 x 100 x 100 mm +/- 5mm
X and Y theorical resolution position: 0,06 mm
Z resolution: 0.0025 mm
Extrusion diameter: 0.35 mm
Filament diameter: 1.75 mm
Optimal temperatures with PLA: 200-230°
Tested and supported filaments: PLA
Unsupported but tested filaments: Cristal Flex, PLA Thermosense, Thermoplastic Polyuretane
(TPU), PET, PLA Sand, PLA Flex
External dimensions: 310 x 330 x 350 mm
Weight: 10 kg
Usage: 65 watt
Electronical board: Official Arduino Mega 2560 with Open Source Marlin Firmware
LCD display 20 x 4 with encoder menu
Preloaded with PLA printing presets
Extruder block with filament pressure regulation

sharebot_arduino_materia03The company will present their new Arduino Materia 101 at Maker Faire Rome next weekend.

Read more on MAKE

dani-draw01

‘Draw It Yourself’ is a MIDI controller created by Dani Sanz which uses conductive ink as push-buttons. It is based on Arduino Uno and uses a capacitive sensor to determine whether the drawn buttons are being touched or not:

This was my second semester project for the Interactive Music Systems Design Course (CDSIM) at the Music Technology Group (MTG) at University Pompeu Fabra of Barcelona. I presented this project at Sonar+D, part of the Sonar festival of Barcelona, held between June 12th and 14th 2014.

dani-draw02

It can be used for multiple applications, not only for music! You can download the Fritzing  and make it yourself on the Instructable and see it in action with this video:

 

repkid’s Fractal Lamp features 3D printed Koch vases with an IKEA dioder for illuminationThe Fractal Lamp was designed using an IKEA dioder lamp with customized 3D printed and laser-cut parts. A customized control box adjusts the desired color of lamp, giving it a unique look.

Read more on MAKE

gaming-loopThere are lots of reasons that someone might want a head-mounted display. Camera operators and radio-controlled vehicle enthusiasts typically like these because they keep the sun off of their screen while working outdoors. Aside from those practical purposes, strapping a high-definition display to your head is just cool. Add some motion […]

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GEMMA on board!Maker Michael Barretta created an LED bracelet that is responsive to sound by combining the technology of light organs and Adafruit’s GEMMA microcontroller. The result is groovy.

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barmixvahIf you’d like a “cool refreshing drink,” but don’t really feel like mixing it yourself, why not just build a robot to do it for you? It might not save time in the long run (I seriously hope not), but as creator Yu Jiang Tham notes, “It’s great fun at […]

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tach1aNot satisfied with the stock tachometer on your car? You could buy an aftermarket kit, but for something truly unique, Pete Mills decided to design and build his own. He calls his creation “blueShift,” which, although possibly optimistic about the speed he will be able to achieve in his Ford […]

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glass-feat13 year old Clay Haight made his own wearable smart glasses, inspired by Google Glass and the pages of Make: magazine.

Read more on MAKE

rabbit h1

[Dave] has some big plans to build himself a 1980′s style computer. Most of the time, large-scale projects can be made easier by breaking them down into their smaller components. [Dave] decided to start his project by designing and constructing a custom controller for his future computer. He calls it the Rabbit H1.

[Dave] was inspired by the HOTAS throttle control system, which is commonly used in aviation. The basic idea behind HOTAS is that the pilot has a bunch of controls built right into the throttle stick. This way, the pilot doesn’t ever have to remove his hand from the throttle. [Dave] took this basic concept and ran with it.

He first designed a simple controller shape in OpenSCAD and printed it out on his 3D printer. He tested it out in his hand and realized that it didn’t feel quite right. The second try was more narrow at the top, resulting in a triangular shape. [Dave] then found the most comfortable position for his fingers and marked the piece with a marker. Finally, he measured out all of the markings and transferred them into OpenSCAD to perfect his design.

[Dave] had some fun with OpenSCAD, designing various hinges and plywood inlays for all of the buttons. Lucky for [Dave], both the 3D printer software as well as the CNC router software accept STL files. This meant that he was able to design both parts together in one program and use the output for both machines.

With the physical controller out of the way, it was time to work on the electronics. [Dave] bought a couple of joysticks from Adafruit, as well as a couple of push buttons. One of the joysticks controls the mouse cursor. The other joystick controls scrolling vertically and horizontally, and includes a push button for left-click. The two buttons are used for middle and right-click. All of these inputs are read by a Teensy Arduino. The Teensy is compact and easily capable of emulating a USB mouse, which makes it perfect for this job.

[Dave] has published his designs on Thingiverse if you would like to try to build one of these yourself.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks


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