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3dprint-star

We can’t miss the chance to play with some LEDs now that holidays are coming and mix some electronics with 3d printing on Materia 101.

In the tutorial of this Kristoffer is experimenting on Xmas decorations, Arduino Micro and some code to play around with.

The result is what you see in the picture below!
xmaslights
Do you want to make it too? Follow the steps on Scuola >>
Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

timelapse4

Using a 3d printer means playing with some hardware but especially some softwares. In the tutorial of this week, the fourth tutorial of our series , Kris is going to introduce you how to work with Slic3r, a G-Code generator for 3d printers and basically a tool you need to convert a digital 3D model into printing instructions for your 3D printer. Slic3r is an open source software able to cut the model into horizontal slices (layers), generates toolpaths to fill them and calculates the amount of material to be extruded so that you can reach good results.

The object you’ll be able to print with your Materia 101 is a pirate hook !

Follow the 12 steps on Scuola and print yours >>

piratehook

Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

 

3d_printing_cyberpunk-spikes-gemma-adafruit-hairflip3D-print these soft, flexible spikes and light them up with full-color programmable LEDs

Read more on MAKE

motionbutton

When you become a happy owner of a Materia 101 3d printer, the first days are really important to start experimenting with the right attitude. Understanding quickly how to get what you want from it means becoming aware of the potential applications of the 3d printing technology in your environment.

Last week we published  the tutorial  on  “Getting started with Materia 101″ created by Kristoffer  and kicking off a series of step-by-step guides to explore different topics, softwares and settings for your 3d printer.

Take a look at the second tutorial focused on  fixing things at home: “Making something useful” tutorial shows you how to start from a need, to design and print a solution. It feels great to be able to fix what’s broken!

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum and give us your feedback.

Next week we are going to post a tutorial on how to create 3d-printed cases for Arduino boards. Stay tuned.

Hashtag: #Materia101

button

MeganLate Friday night I saw what may be the future of toys, or at least something completely unique at my local Toys'R'Us.

Read more on MAKE

Bored with playing games with a non-glowing ball? Why not build your own IcosaLEDron, a programmable, LED-enabled glowing contraption about the size of a baseball. This ball, as seen on Instructables, features 20 sides that light up as different colors depending on the situation. An ATmega328p board, which is Arduino-compatible, […]
Nutty tinkerer and the inside of the A6 v.1.0.One nutty tinkerer built a gun that folds and fires paper airplanes.

Read more on MAKE

Materia-101_5We take an early look at the Materia 101, Arduino’s first foray into 3D printers

Read more on MAKE

ironman6

It’s exciting how much 3D printing has enabled us to produce pretty much any shape for any purpose on the fly. Among the most thoughtful uses for the technology that we’ve seen are the many functioning and often beautiful prosthetics that not only succeed in restoring the use of a limb, but also deliver an air of style and self-expression to the wearer. The immediate nature of the technology allows for models to be designed and produced rapidly at a low-cost, which works excellently for growing children. [Pat Starace’s] Iron Man inspired 3D printed hand and forearm are a perfect example of such personality and expert engineering… with an added dash of hacker flair.

With over twenty years of experience in animatronics behind him, [Starace] expertly concealed all of the mechanical ligaments within the design of his arm, producing a streamline limb with all the nuance of lifelike gesture. It was important that the piece not only work, but give the wearer that appropriate super hero-like feeling while wearing it. He achieves this with all the bells and whistles hidden within the negative space of the forearm, which give the wearer an armory of tricks up their sleeve. Concealed in the plating, [Starace] uses an Arduino and accelerometer to animate different sets of LEDs as triggered by the hand’s position coupled with specific voice commands. Depending on what angle the wrist is bent at, the fingers will either curl into a fist and reveal hidden ‘lasers’ on the back of the hand, or spread open around a pulsing circle of light on the palm when thrust outward.

The project took [Starace] quite a bit of time to print all the individual parts; around two days worth of time. This however is still considered quick in comparison to the custom outfitting and production of traditional prosthetics… not to mention, the traditional stuff wouldn’t have LEDs. This piece has a noble cause, and is an exciting example of how 3D printing is adding a level of heroism to everyday life.

Thank you Julius for pointing out this awesome project to us!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, wearable hacks

Arduinomateria101

During Maker Faire Rome we announced and gave a preview of our new project called Arduino Materia 101, the 3d printer developed in collaboration with Sharebot.

We are happy to announce that starting today the 3d printer is available for pre-order (30 days delivery time) from Arduino Store :

We can also share with you a list of documentation to learn all the details about it:

  • Product page with downloadable PDFs of
    • Use Manual in English and Italian
    • Assembly Manual (soon online in Italian and  in English)

In the next weeks we are going to post on the blog some cool hacks and user profiles to make it even easier to enjoy with the 3d printer.

 



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