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Git Commit is an interactive installation and exhibition about smart homes, and user response to pervasive technologies entering our private spaces. The installation aims to further the research that Casa Jasmina, powered by Arduino and Genuino, is carrying out regarding social home environment from an open design and user centered perspective.

In order to deeply understand the impact of IoT in the house for the possible stakeholders, an interactive system of four mini-printers will be set up at Palazzo Clerici, a 17th century building located in the heart of the city of Milan, and firstly belonged to one of the oldest and most powerful Milanese families, the Visconti dei Consignori di Somma.

Each printer will be connected to Casa Jasmina GitHub repository where users will be able to respond to questions and spark new avenues to the project.

The feedback gained will inform new types of interactions and approaches to the future smart home, that will reflow in the Casa Jasmina design process.

Come and visit us and give us your input too! Check this page and explore the topics.

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Casa Jasmina and FabLab Torino in partnership with Officine Arduino e Toolbox Coworking are hosting the IX° edition of the Share Prize, an international competition that promotes and supports contemporary art in the digital age .

The prize theme is ”House Guests” and focuses on the use of electronic art inside the private domestic space.

Share prize’s artistic director is Bruce Sterling, writer, journalist and critic of the new media. He invited two special guests to join the international jury: Cap. Samantha Cristoforetti and Paola Antonelli.

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Captain Samantha Cristoforetti is the European Space Agency astronaut protagonist of Futura mission, the second long-duration mission ASI,  engineer and design enthusiast. Paola Antonelli, is the Senior Curator of the Department of Architecture & Design as well as the Director of R&D at MoMA New York. Paola Antonelli was responsible for adding video games, the Arduino control board and innovative 3DPrinted objects to the NY MoMA’s permanent design collection.

The jury is then completed by Chiara Garibaldi, the SHARE Festival director, Jasmina Tesanovic, widely known as “the Jasmina of Casa Jasmina”.

On March 4th the Share jury will meet to select the entries for Share Festival and Samantha Cristoforetti and Paola Antonelli are going to give a public talk at Toolbox Coworking  from h.17:30 to h.19:30 (CET).  Stay tuned  on our social channels for the live streaming link. 

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The Academy Awards night is coming and it’s a perfect moment to be nominated and  win a prize.  Casa Jasmina project won its prize yesterday: the Internet of Things Awards, showcasing excellence in all areas across the Internet of Things since 2011, in the category of best IoT open source project – Editors Choice Winner.

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The Open Source award “honors projects that bring those values to the Internet of Things, either by incorporating open source technology or by making public the details of their own designs and software”, this is the idea of the IoT awards organization in which Casa Jasmina completely believes.

The open source movement is for Arduino and consequently for Casa Jasmina, the core of internet in terms of hardware, software and protocols that compose the global communication infrastructure, and in this way the power of collaborative development is the main focus of Casa Jasmina idea.

As a futuristic Wunderkammer, Casa Jasmina will collect and share artificialia to present in a open way system what and how the IoT concepts will change the daily home life.

Winning this competition is for Casa Jasmina the acknowledgement of a project that take on to transform into reality a series of reflections around IoT and open source. Casa Jasmina is really proud to have been selected between 21 projects, because this represent the attention we are trying to attract.

There is still a lot of work, Casa Jasmina is working hard to rich the goal; it’s not simple but awards like this give hope to the project, and show the interest that exists on these issues.

So thank you all

(Read the blogpost on Casa Jasmina blog)

Ago
03

David Cuartielles and Bruce Sterling at Sonar

CasaJasmina, education, Exhibition, Featured, keynote, Sonar, workshop Commenti disabilitati su David Cuartielles and Bruce Sterling at Sonar 

Photo: Sonar+D

Sónar+D is the international conference that brings together a combination of activities with a common theme: the relationship between creativity and technology and the digital transformation of the cultural industries involved.

During latest edition David Cuartielles gave a talk about the value of Open Source and a workshop with Alessandro Contini titled Making Noise with Arduino

David presented some examples like:

  • The Alcontrol Device (a breath analyser that detects high alcohol levels and limits mobile usage of a user depending on how drunk he/she is)
  • The involuntary dance machine that uses electrical stimulus to different muscles
  • A 5-day hack to a car that needed be driven remotely by musicians playing live
  • A large scale light installation for the Jakarta Marathon

He also got the opportunity to talk about robotics, kids learning code and electronics, and the future of Arduino. Later on Bruce Sterling, curator of Casa Jasmina,  was the protagonist of the festival’s closing keynote and talked about technology, music and the past/current state of the industry.

Photo: Sonar+D
News originally posted on Arduino Verkstad blog

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Casa Jasmina, Torino’s Open-Source Connected Apartment, opens its doors on Saturday during Mini Maker Faire in Torino. The unique example of connected apartment with open-source ideals, promoted by Arduino and curated by the futurist and science fiction writer Bruce Sterling, is hosted by Toolbox Coworking in a old industrial building already shared by Officine Arduino (the Italian Arduino headquarter), and Fablab Torino.

During the opening, Casa Jasmina will be available publicly for the first time, hosting some local Maker furnitures, an Italian selection of Valcucine kitchen appliances, household works by International Open Source designers (OpenDesk, Jesse Howard, Aker, Open Structure), and a small display of various connected objects and artifacts from the Energy@Home consortium, Torino Share Festival, and designs and prototypes from the first Casa Jasmina “Call for Projects”.

In the forthcoming months, Casa Jasmina will host residency programs, workshops and talks. This “house of the future” is not restricted to technicians but is meant for people interested in everyday life under near-future conditions and will be available on AirBnB for futurist weekends in Torino.

During the day at the Faire from 10am to 7pm,  you can explore over 50  makers’ projects, listen to many talks and  to the presentation of Casa Jasmina project by Bruce Sterling, enjoy a kids’ area with activities and a lab for the little ones.

Casa Jasmina  guided tours are starting from 11.30 am. Check the program.

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Mag
13

Casa Jasmina and Bruce Sterling at Thingscon 2015

arduino, bruce sterling, CasaJasmina, Featured, iot, privacy, Security, Thingscon Commenti disabilitati su Casa Jasmina and Bruce Sterling at Thingscon 2015 

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Bruce Sterling went to Thingscon conference with a keynote about Casa Jasmina and then published the following essay.

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This is the third of my Casa Jasmina essays. It’s about the recent “ThingsCon” conference in Berlin, May 2015.

This remarkable event was the second “ThingsCon,” a new gathering which makes itself useful to the European hardware startup scene, especially “connected products” designers and builders from Berlin and London. “ThingsCon” took place in Berlin’s “Culture Brewery,” which is a huge, defunct beer factory, currently re-zoned for theaters, bars, restaurants and design retail.

Anybody who has seen the Garrone Foundry (which houses Toolbox Co-Working, Fab Lab Torino and Casa Jasmina), would surely recognize the “Culture Brewery.” It’s the same European story: the old industrial hulk remade for today’s culture-industry. So we found the ThingsCon venue to be pretty cozy, even though the stairs are of odd sizes, the huge, lofty rooms don’t fit together properly, the events and workshops are on different floors and mysteriously distant from one another, and there was excellent beer everywhere and tiny, crooked bathrooms stuck nowhere in particular. There’s something fun about this steampunk disorganization — if you’ve built a weird open-source Internet-of-Things device out of glued plywood and steel rods, it really fits that atmosphere.

ThingsCon is not a Maker Faire for the general public, and attending it is not cheap. ThingsCon is aimed at designers, developers, engineers, entrepreneurs and similar stakeholder-types from the technology ecosystem. The presentations were full of practical wisdom about commercial tech-product development: scaring up funding money, allocating time and resources, packaging, promotion, marketing, founder exit-strategies, angel investment, the issues common to people who might like to sit down for a serious talk with, say, Intel.

The organizers of ThingsCon are Peter Bihr, Simon Hoher, Emanuel Schwarz, Max Kruger, Sonja Heinen, Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino, Brady Forrest, Louisa Heinrich, and Marcel Schouwenaar. As conference organizers go, they won’t win any prizes for sleek efficiency. However when it comes to the Internet of Things, these activists know plenty. At ThingsCon you can learn a lot in a hurry.

So: now that we understand what ThingsCon is about and who ThingsCon is meant to please, let’s confront some of their native ThingsCon problems, because they have lots of interesting issues.

The guy who delivered the first ThingsCon opening keynote, Warren Ellis, really understands their pains. Warren Ellis is pretty well known as a comic book writer, film scriptwriter and novelist, but he was also in the brain-trust of BERG,the legendary and now-dead London interaction-design firm. Warren Ellis grasps the many thorny difficulties of modern connected-product design.

Ellis delivered a sardonically funny rant, warning designers, engineers and manufacturers about the fierce wrath of genuine consumers. Consumers — (they’re the people who are supposed to buy Internet-of-Things products) — are a fickle and treacherous group. Consumers are never grateful for the hard work of designers and technicians. On the contrary, consumers are suspicious, endlessly demanding of customer support, and they resent most things they buy. The Internet-of-Things is even worse than traditional consumer capitalism, because interactive products don’t just sit there, they are invasive and intimate. People treasure their homes as a safe space in a harsh, competitive world, and they feel emotionally wounded when anything in their house betrays them.

Warren Ellis is an intelligent and erudite man, and he was telling the crowd the truth, but they were all laughing nervously because they can’t really believe what he says. It’s all true, but it’s important to understand this and still have some courage about it. If you invent and manufacture something, and it’s a commercial success and ten million people buy the product, of course your life is going to change. You won’t be a “Maker” alone in a garage any more, you’ll be an Internet multimillionaire with customer-support issues. Warren Ellis is right to urge people to think these things through: you shouldn’t dabble in technology and business unless you’re ready to face the consequences of getting what you want.

Barriers to entry in manufacturing are collapsing, so the old lines between a do-it-yourself Maker and a commercial industrialist are blurring. But this doesn’t solve old problems, it just creates interesting new ones. This was the lesson conveyed by Tina Aspiala. Before ThingsCon 2015, I had never heard of Tina Aspiala. Thanks to ThingsCon, I will pay attention to Tina Aspiala from now on.

Tina, who achieved some success with a product of hers, has become a Kickstarter patroness. Tina Aspiala spends a lot of time on Kickstarter and likes to give people some crowdfunding money just to see what happens. She told the crowd that results were mixed. Kickstarter is a funding platform, but some people on Kickstarter are crooks, they’re Kickstarter embezzlers. Other people want to be honest, but they flee in terror when they realize what the real world expects from real design and manufacturing. Others just have bad luck with their Kickstarter: they really wanted to do the work, but they broke a leg, or Dad died, or there was a divorce… that mishap wouldn’t stop FIAT or General Electric, but it does stop the Kickstarter team because they are few in number, while FIAT and General Electric have thousands of personnel.

Many Kickstarter projects get built, despite the host of problems in shipping, supply chains, material costs and manufacturing — but that doesn’t end the story. The product might be workable, but just not much good. The product might do what is promised, but the thing that the product does is only interesting once or twice, not useful in daily life. It’s a “gonzo product” (in the term created by Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino), because it physically works and it does something, but the thing it does is eccentric and weird, so it has no commercial potential or mass appeal.

Why do we have “gonzo products” nowadays? It’s because (as Tina Aspiala pointed out), cheap electronic components make new combinations easy. Projectors, motors, sensors, cameras, processors and various wireless connectivity chips are all drastically cheaper, so product development becomes like a card game, when any gambler can connect X with Y and add some Z, then hope for a jackpot payoff.

In the case of the Internet of Things, there are many possible inputs — dozens of sensors of all kinds — but very limited outputs, because most IoT gizmos can only do very limited things to get any human attention: they blink, or beep, or vibrate. Blinking, beeping, vibrating things that demand human attention can get pretty annoying. Clearly this is a major IoT problem. Tina Aspiala recommends trying to think this situation through with some design perspective, instead of just hacking more components and attaching them to breadboards with soldering irons. That’s a point of view that makes some sense, though, let’s face it, people are gonna want to do it the easy way.

ThingsCon abounded in talks and workshops, more than I can describe here, but the most interesting thing on offer at Thingscon 2015 was the “IOT Design Manifesto”.  That’s why I’m placing the manifesto here in this post.

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A manifesto is a sign of creative health. It’s not that I agree with the “IoT Design Manifesto” — on the contrary, if everybody agrees with a manifesto, then the manifesto is vapid and useless and hasn’t really said anything. Even a manifesto that’s completely wrong can be useful, because it motivates people to rebel and try something else. This manifesto is pretty good, in my opinion, because it’s kindly in tone and well-mannered, it confronts quite a few of the IoT’s real problems.

Even the first declarations, one and two, “We don’t believe the hype, we design useful things,” singles out the ThingsCon crowd as people who are skeptical and yet also trying to get something done. It’s a good attitude for a young industry. The other declarations are about about participation, security, privacy, data collection, association, personal agency, sustainability and humanity. These are some big, hairy issues which aren’t going to get solved in anybody’s lifetime. However, if you spend your life with the Internet of Things you’re going to be dealing with situations of that kind all the time. So, might as well get used to that prospect now.

The authors of this IoT Manifesto are Andrew Spitz, Ruben van der Vleuten, Marcel Schouwenaar, Harm van Beek, Kevin Verelst, Anner Tiete, Jan Belon, Marcel van Heist and Holly Robbins. Before I went to ThingsCon I’d never heard of any of those people, but they were right to do what they did, and I’ll be watching them with a lot more interest from now on. People tend to grow by the size of their chosen problems. These people have some pretty big problems.

I closed the ThingsCon event by asking the people there to help us with our house.

It’s a bit scary to open the faucet in this way: we don’t know if we’ll get a huge flood, or just a groan in the pipe and some dripping. If we get a lot of interest, Casa Jasmina will be crowded and noisy; if interest is more modest, we’ll try to concentrate on a few core issues. In our Internet-of-Things house, we’ll have to acquire some things, accept some things, build some things and maybe commission some things, too. The project has started deliberately, we have paced ourselves, but as the months pass, Casa Jasmina will slowly become a unique and interesting place, a true place of difference.

I wondered, in starting this project, who would ever really want to stay in such a place, and, having been to ThingsCon, I now have a much better idea about that. ThingsCon had about 300 people attending it — the “new hardware movement” are not a mass movement of millions — but those three hundred people are real people. They are bright and committed, and they really exist. If we understand them as our natural guests and we try to please them, I think we’ll do well.

Bruce Sterling

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Apr
13

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Casa Jasmina and Arduino are proud to announce a collaboration with Opendesk at Atelier Clerici during Fuorisalone 2015.

Atelier Clerici will host an independent project curated by Space Caviar and Z33, with a daily program of exhibitions and activities aimed at questioning the future of design in relation to architecture, technology and global context of living.

Opendesk, the online platform for open and smart design, will join Atelier Clerici with ‘Open Making Platform’ a series of events exploring issues related to open source design as a global and, at the same time, local practice. The program of  ‘Open Making Platform’ will include an exhibition of smart open designs made by local Italian makers and two workshops: ‘Design for Open Making’ (Wed April 15th, 11.30 am – 1.30 pm)and ‘Smart Furniture’ (Fri April 17th, 2 – 5.30 PM), in collaboration with Arduino.

Arduino and Casa Jasmina invite you to take part to the meetup and informal workshop focusing on the integration of open source connected technologies into everyday objects. Friday’s event will include a presentation by Bruce Sterling about the Casa Jasmina project.

Register for the event here.

Mar
17

Bruce Sterling interviews Massimo Banzi on Casa Jasmina and more!

arduino, bruce sterling, CasaJasmina, Featured, Interview, iot, Massimo Banzi, video Commenti disabilitati su Bruce Sterling interviews Massimo Banzi on Casa Jasmina and more! 

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During the first opening of Casa Jasmina, Bruce Sterling found a moment to discuss about IoT, Casa Jasmina and Arduino future plans with Massimo Banzi. Check out this exclusive video were two of the minds behind the Casa Jasmina project dialogate about the future:

 

Feb
12

Casa Jasmina discussing IoT at Transmediale in Berlin

CasaJasmina, Featured, iot, opensource Commenti disabilitati su Casa Jasmina discussing IoT at Transmediale in Berlin 

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This post, written by  Jasmina Tesanovic and Bruce Sterling, was originally posted on Casa Jasmina blog.


 

On February 2, we were in Berlin’s “House of World Cultures” to discuss “Casa Jasmina.” We were participating in the Transmediale Festival, as part of an event roundtable on the topic of “the Internet of Things.”

Luckily, since we’re electronic art journalists, we’ve seen about a million public panels of this kind. It never surprises us when everybody at a round table has a different angle on the problem.

Our own answer, as we described it to the crowd at Transmediale, is pretty simple. “Casa Jasmina” is a new project to build an IoT home that’s (1) open source (2) luxurious and (3) Turinese.

Our panel featured Arduino colleague David Cuartielles, who memorably described Arduino as “fifty guys in six garages in six different countries.” In “Casa Jasmina,” basically, we’re the cool clubhouse in one of those six garages. That is our purpose and nature.

The “Internet of Things” is a very big topic. It’s physically impossible for anybody anywhere to keep up with every IoT appliance, wearable, machine-to-machine app, set-top box, thing-router, platform, protocol, cloud and app. There are so many commercial IoT gimmicks available right now that we could fill the Mole Antonelliana with them from top to bottom. However, we’re not going to try that. Instead we are concentrating on our own distinct approach to the Internet of Things issue.

That’s where the “luxury” aspect comes in. “Lusso Open Source.” We’re interested in “luxury” because we’re Turinese. Italy is into boutique manufacturing and luxury export, especially Italian furniture, clothing, foodstuffs and kitchen gear. Italy’s got lots of hackerspaces and makerspace now: over thirty of them, and the Maker scene is advancing fast. This means that some domestic refinement is in order: Italians need to class this Maker stuff up and sell it to the foreign tourists. That’s what Italians do, such is the time-honored Italian way of life. The traditional craft cachet of “Made in Italy” ought to be followed by the less-traditional digital-craft cachet of “Make in Italy.” Why not?

Since Torino is the manufacturing center of Italy, Torino obviously the place to try this. We’re pretty sure it is bound to happen anyway. “Casa Jasmina” should be a place where concerned people can sit down, have a glass of Piedmontese red and think that prospect over. What does “Luxury Open Source” really mean, anyway? What would Ettore Sotsass, Bruno Munari, or Enzo Mari do about this?

Keep reading on Casa Jasmina Blog >>

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Feb
05

Casa Jasmina Project is about to roll, with style

arduino, Arduino Yún, CasaJasmina, Featured, iot, Lamp(s), lasercut, Workshops Commenti disabilitati su Casa Jasmina Project is about to roll, with style 

oscola

The location of the Casa Jasmina apartment will officially be inaugurated here in Torino (Italy) on the 20th of February, together with the celebration of  the 3rd birthday of local Officine Arduino and Fablab Torino.

The two following days (21-22 of February) we’re going to start producing the first connected things for the apartment in a workshop with the support of Jesse Howard, a designer focusing on new systems of making.

He’ll fly in from Amsterdam and run a 2-day session together with Lorenzo Romagnoli (Casa Jasmina Project Manager) and Stefano Paradiso (Fablab Torino Coordinator) with the goal of designing and manufacturing an Open Source Connected Lamp (OSCOLA).

The workshop is suitable for designers, artists, hackers, and everyone interested in Arduino and open source design and in order to stress the idea of open design, participants will be asked to reinterpret, modify and redesign an open source lamp proposed by Jesse Howard.
A minimum familiarity with of CAD drawings, digital fabrication techniques and Arduino are recommended but not strictly necessary.

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By changing materials, shape, use cases, mechanics, and interaction, we are going to create a family of open source lamps.
Arduino Yún will be used to make the lamp interactive, enabling the user to turn it on or off remotely; change the light color; use the light to visualize data etc, or connect one lamp to an other.

The OSCOLA workshop (book your participation!)  consists of 16 hours of class taking place at Fablab Torino and a ticket is valid for two people.  At the end of the workshop, each couple of participants will bring home their IoT open-source lamp and a copy will be reproduced to stay at Casa Jasmina!



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