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Archive for the ‘Tracker’ Category

Space. The final frontier. Unfortunately, the vast majority of us are planet-locked until further notice. If you are dedicated hobbyist astronomer, you probably already have the rough positions of the planets memorized. But what if you want to know them exactly from the comfort of your room and educate yourself at the same time? [Shubham Paul] has gone the extra parsec to build a Real-Time Planet Tracker that calculates their locations using Kepler’s Laws with exacting precision.

An Arduino Mega provides the brains, while 3.5-turn-pan and 180-degree-tilt servos are the brawn. A potentiometer and switch allow for for planet and mode selection, while a GPS module and an optional MPU9250 gyroscope/magnetometer let it know where you are. Finally a laser pointer shows the planet’s location in a closed room. And then there’s code: a lot of code.

The hardware side of things — as [Shubham Paul] clarifies — looks a little unfinished because the focus of the project is the software with the intent to instruct. They have included all the code they wrote for the RTPT, providing a breakdown in each section for those who are looking to build their own.

There is an extra step to auto-align the RTPT to north, otherwise you’ll have to do so manually. But [Shubham Paul] has designed it so that even if you move the tracker about, the RTPT will readjust its calculations in real time. Each part of the project includes a wealth of related information beyond simple instructions to adequately equip any prospective builders.

This hack gets the job done. If it’s looks you’re after, an artistic expression of maker skills and astronomy can be seen in this planetary map that relies on persistence of vision.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, software hacks

[Bruce Helsen] built this dual axis solar tracker as one of his final projects for school.

As can be experimentally verified in a very short timeframe, the sun moves across the sky. This is a particularly troublesome behavior for solar panels, which work best when the sun shines directly on them. Engineers soon realized that abstracting the sun away only works in physics class, and moved to the second best idea of tracking sun by moving the panel. Surprisingly, for larger installations the cost of adding tracking (and its maintenance) isn’t worth the gains, but for smaller, and especially urban, installations like [Bruce]’s it can still help.

[Bruce]’s build can be entirely sourced from eBay. The light direction is sensed via a very clever homemade directional light sensor. A 3D printer extruded cross profile sits inside an industrial lamp housing. The assembly divides the sky into four quadrants with a light-dependent resistor for each. By measuring the differences, the panel can point in the optimal direction.

The panel’s two axis are controlled with two cheap linear actuators. The brains are an Arduino glued to a large amount of solar support electronics and the online energy monitor component is covered by an ESP8266.

The construction works quite well. If you’d like to build one yourself the entire BOM, drawings, and code are provided on the instructables page.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, solar hacks
Apr
02

Arduino based high-altitude balloon tracker

arduino, ATMeag328, gps, Tracker Commenti disabilitati su Arduino based high-altitude balloon tracker 

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Ugifer wrote this instructable detailing the build of his Arduino based high-altitude balloon tracker:

The tracker is based upon the Atmel ATMeag328 Microcontroller which forms the heart of many of the popular “Arduino” boards. We are going to make an “Arduino Compatible” board which we can program using the Arduino IDE.
Because the GPS module and SD card both require 3.3v and we have plenty of computing power, we may as well make the whole tracker run on 3v3. That means that we can’t clock the ‘328 up to its full 16MHz but it will run happily at 8MHz on 3v3, and that’s plenty for our purposes.

Arduino based high-altitude balloon tracker - [Link]



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