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Archive for the ‘RGB’ Category

[smash_hand] had a clear goal: a big, featureless, white plastic disk with RGB LEDs concealed around its edge. So what is it? A big ornament that could glow any color or trippy mixture of colors one desires. It’s an object whose sole purpose is to be a frame for soft, glowing light patterns to admire. The disk can be controlled with a simple smartphone app that communicates over Bluetooth, allowing anyone (or in theory anything) to play with the display.

The disk is made from 1/4″ clear plastic, which [smash_hand] describes as plexiglass, but might be acrylic or polycarbonate. [smash_hands] describes some trial and error in the process of cutting the circle; it was saw-cut with some 3-in-1 oil as cutting fluid first, then the final shape cut with a bandsaw.

The saw left the edge very rough, so it was polished with glass polishing compound. This restores the optical properties required for the edge-lighting technique. The back of the disc was sanded then painted white, and the RGB LEDs spaced evenly around the edge, pointing inwards.

The physical build is almost always the difficult part in a project like this — achieving good diffusion of LEDs is a topic we talk about often. [smash_hands] did an impressive job and there are never any “hot spots” where an LED sticks out to your eye. With this taken care of, the electronics came together with much less effort. An Arduino with an HC-05 Bluetooth adapter took care of driving the LEDs and wireless communications, respectively. A wooden frame later, and the whole thing is ready to go.

[smash_hands] provides details like a wiring diagram as well as the smartphone app for anyone who is interested. There’s the Arduino program as well, but interestingly it’s only available in assembly or as a raw .hex file. A video of the disk in action is embedded below.

Making LED lighting interactive comes in many different shapes and forms, and as the disk above shows, shifting color patterns can be pleasantly relaxing.

For all the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, people still find ways to make time for their passions. In the lead up to Christmas, [Edwin Mol] and a few co-workers built themselves an LED Christmas tree that adds a maker’s touch to any festive decor.

Before going too far, they cut out a cardboard mock-up of the tree. This an easy step to skip, but it can save headaches later! Once happy with the prototype, they printed off the design stencils and cut the chunks of clear acrylic using power tools — you don’t need a laser cutter to produce good stuff — and drilled dozens of holes in the plastic to mount LEDs, and run wires.

A Raspberry Pi 3 and Arduino Uno make this in league with some pretty smart Christmas trees. MAX6968 5.5V constant-current LED driver chips and MOFSETs round out the control circuit. During the build, the central LED column provided a significant challenge — how often do you build a custom jig to solder LEDs? That done, it’s time for a good ol’-fashioned assembly montage! The final product can cycle through several different lighting animations in a rainbow of colours — perfect for a festive build.

Even though Christmas has just passed, your holiday hacks are still flooding in! While you wait for us to push those out the metaphorical door, check out some of our other favorites like this massive pixel display, a free-formed LED tree, and a Raspberry Pi gingerbread house.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Holiday Hacks

Screen Shot 2015-10-21 at 12.27.02 PMTrick-or-treaters are bound to get a thrill when you make this choreographed music and light display that plays each time your gate is opened.

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The post Choreograph a Music and Light Display for the Holiday appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

torch1Tiki torches are a fun summer lighting solution and this RGB LED version, that uses an Arduino, can be a great alternative to an open flame.

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The post Mason Jar LED Tiki Torches Glow Any Color appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

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26

How to use an RGB LED – Arduino Tutorial

arduino, LED, RGB Commenti disabilitati su How to use an RGB LED – Arduino Tutorial 

FOEWMAHIBC23IHW.LARGE

by codebender_cc @ instructables.com:

An RGB LED has 4 pins, one for each color (Red, Green, Blue) and a common cathode. It has tree different color-emitting diodes that can be combined to create all sorts of color! Any color is possible depending on how bright each diode is.

How to use an RGB LED – Arduino Tutorial – [Link]

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13

Arduino Shields from Infineon

arduino, dmx512, Infineon, LED, motor, RGB, XMC1202 Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Shields from Infineon 

DC-Motor-Control_top-view_plain

by elektor.com:

Infineon have announced two shields for the Arduino development environment. The RGB LED Lighting Shield (shown left) provides three independent output channels with a DC/DC LED driver stage to give flicker-free control of multicolor LEDs. It is fitted with an XMC1202 microcontroller using a Brightness Color Control Unit (BCCU) to help off-load time-critical events from the Arduino processor. The Shield can be expanded by adding an optional isolated DMX512 interface for stage lighting control and audio nodes or a 24 GHz radar sensor for motion detection.

Arduino Shields from Infineon - [Link]

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06

Arduino Powered Digital Kaleidoscope

arduino, arduino hacks, colors, kaleidoscope, LED, pretty colors, RGB, strip Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Powered Digital Kaleidoscope 

kaleidoscope

[Jose's] latest project brings an old visual effect toy up to date with digital electronics. Most of us are familiar with inexpensive kaleidoscope toys. Some of us have even built cheap versions of them with paper tubes, mirrors, and beads. [Jose] wanted to try to recreate the colorful pattern effects created by a kaleidoscope using an Arduino and an addressable LED strip.

The build is actually pretty simple. The base is a disc of PVC cut to just a few inches in diameter. [Jose] started with an addressable LED strip containing 60 LEDs. He then cut it into 12 sections, each containing five LEDs. The smaller strips were then mounted to the disc, similar to spokes on a bicycle wheel. The LED strip already has an adhesive backing, so that part was trivial.

The final step was to add some kind of diffuser screen. The LED strips on their own are not all that interesting. The diffuser allows the light to blend together, forming interesting patterns that are more reminiscent of the patterns you might see in a real kaleidoscope. Without the diffuser you would just see individual points of light, rather than blended color patterns.

The whole thing is controlled by a small Arduino. [Jose] has made the code available at the bottom of his blog post. Be sure to watch the video of the system in action below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Set
04

What Everyone Needs: An Eight-Foot LED Light Staff

arduino, Electronics, General, LED, persistence of vision, pov, RGB Commenti disabilitati su What Everyone Needs: An Eight-Foot LED Light Staff 

Yep, that's a light staff - 'Darth Maul Urges  Intensifies'Hackaday.io blogger 'Risknc' updates his Light Staff prototype, much to the excitement of the LARPing community. It is a 8-foot staff filled with High Intensity LEDs that put on quite a show.

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30

Infinity Mirror Clock

We don’t think we’ve seen an Infinity Mirror Clock before, but we love this new twist on an old favorite. Different colors distinguish between seconds, minutes and hours, and an additional IR sensor detects when someone is directly in front of the clock and switches the LEDs off, allowing it to be used as a normal mirror. This build is the work of [Dushyant Ahuja], who is no stranger to hacking together clocks out of LEDs. You can tell how much progress he’s made with the mirror clock by taking a glance at his first project, which is an impressive creation held together by jumbles of wire and some glue.

[Dushyant] has stepped up his game for his new clock, attaching an LED strip along the inside of a circular frame to fashion the infinity mirror effect. The lights receive a signal from an attached homemade Arduino board, which is also connected to a real-time clock (RTC) module to keep time and to a Bluetooth module, which allows [Dushyant] to program the clock wirelessly rather than having to drag out some cords if the clock ever needs an adjustment.

Stick around after the jump for a quick demonstration video. The lights are dazzling to watch; [Dushyant] inserted a stainless steel plate at the center of the circle to reflect the outer rim of LEDs. After a quick rainbow effect, it looks like the mirror enters clock mode. See if you can figure out what time it is. For a more step-by-step overview of this project, swing by his Instructables page.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, clock hacks, led hacks
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18

Hacking the Macetech RGB Shades

arduino, General, LED, macetech, music, RGB, shades Commenti disabilitati su Hacking the Macetech RGB Shades 

macetech-hackSome of the more in-your-face pieces of wearable technology are macetech’s RGB Shades and LED Matrix Shades. They’re shutter shade sunglasses with a twist: the front surface is crammed with individually controllable LEDs. It’s an attention-grabbing effect, and the person wearing the Shades can see through the LED array just […]

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