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Learn how to connect your Arduino to the outside world via Ethernet

This is chapter sixteen of our huge Arduino tutorial seriesUpdated 06/12/2013

In this chapter we will introduce and examine the use of Ethernet networking with Arduino over local networks and the greater Internet. It will be assumed that you have a basic understanding of computer networking, such as the knowledge of how to connect computers to a hub/router with RJ45 cables, what an IP and MAC address is, and so on. Furthermore, here is a good quick rundown about Ethernet.

Getting Started

You will need an Arduino Uno or compatible board with an Ethernet shield that uses the W5100 Ethernet controller IC (pretty much all of them):

Arduino Ethernet shield

…or consider using a Freetronics EtherTen – as it has everything all on the one board, plus some extras:

Freetronics EtherTen

Furthermore you will need to power the board via the external DC socket – the W5100 IC uses more current than the USB power can supply. A 9V 1A plug pack/wall wart will suffice. Finally it does get hot – so be careful not to touch the W5100 after extended use. In case you’re not sure – this is the W5100 IC:

Wiznet W5100

Once you have your Ethernet-enabled Arduino, and have the external power connected – it’s a good idea to check it all works. Open the Arduino IDE and selectFile > Examples > Ethernet > Webserver. This loads a simple sketch which will display data gathered from the analogue inputs on a web browser. However don’t upload it yet, it needs a slight modification.

You need to specify the IP address of the Ethernet shield – which is done inside the sketch. This is simple, go to the line:

IPAddress ip(192,168,1, 177);

And alter it to match your own setup. For example, in my home the router’s IP address is 10.1.1.1, the printer is 10.1.1.50 and all PCs are below …50. So I will set my shield IP to 10.1.1.77 by altering the line to:

IPAddress ip(10,1,1,77);

You also have the opportunity to change your MAC address. Each piece of networking equipment has a unique serial number to identify itself over a network, and this is normall hard-programmed into the equipments’ firmware. However with Arduino we can define the MAC address ourselves.

If you are running more than one Ethernet shield on your network, ensure they have different MAC addresses by altering the hexadecimal values in the line:

byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED };

However if you only have one shield just leave it be. There may be the very, very, statistically rare chance of having a MAC address the same as your existing hardware, so that would be another time to change it.

Once you have made your alterations, save and upload the sketch. Now open a web browser and navigate to the IP address you entered in the sketch, and you should be presented with something similar to the following:

 Arduino webserver example sketch

What’s happening? The Arduino has been programmed to offer a simple web page with the values measured by the analogue inputs. You can refresh the browser to get updated values.

At this point – please note that the Ethernet shields use digital pins 10~13, so you can’t use those for anything else. Some Arduino Ethernet shields may also have a microSD card socket, which also uses another digital pin – so check with the documentation to find out which one.

Nevertheless, now that we can see the Ethernet shield is working we can move on to something more useful. Let’s dissect the previous example in a simple way, and see how we can distribute and display more interesting data over the network. For reference, all of the Ethernet-related functions are handled by the Ethernet Arduino library. If you examine the previous sketch we just used, the section that will be of interest is:

 for (int analogChannel = 0; analogChannel < 6; analogChannel++) 
          {
            int sensorReading = analogRead(analogChannel);
            client.print("analog input ");
            client.print(analogChannel);
            client.print(" is ");
            client.print(sensorReading);
            client.println("<br />");       
          }
          client.println("</html>");

Hopefully this section of the sketch should be familiar – remember how we have used serial.print(); in the past when sending data to the serial monitor box? Well now we can do the same thing, but sending data from our Ethernet shield back to a web browser – on other words, a very basic type of web page.

However there is something you may or may not want to  learn in order to format the output in a readable format – HTML code. I am not a website developer (!) so will not delve into HTML too much.

However if you wish to serve up nicely formatted web pages with your Arduino and so on, here would be a good start. In the interests of simplicity, the following two functions will be the most useful:

client.print(" is ");

Client.print (); allows us to send text or data back to the web page. It works in the same way as serial.print(), so nothing new there. You can also specify the data type in the same way as with serial.print(). Naturally you can also use it to send data back as well. The other useful line is:

client.println("<br />");

which sends the HTML code back to the web browser telling it to start a new line. The part that actually causes the carriage return/new line is the <br /> which is an HTML code (or “tag”) for a new line. So if you are creating more elaborate web page displays, you can just insert other HTML tags in the client.print(); statement. If you want to learn more about HTML commands, here’s a good tutorial site. Finally – note that the sketch will only send the data when it has been requested, that is when it has received a request from the web browser.

Accessing your Arduino over the Internet

So far – so good. But what if you want to access your Arduino from outside the local network?

You will need a static IP address – that is, the IP address your internet service provider assigns to your connection needs to stay the same. If you don’t have a static IP, as long as you leave your modem/router permanently swiched on your IP shouldn’t change. However that isn’t an optimal solution.

If your ISP cannot offer you a static IP at all, you can still move forward with the project by using an organisation that offers a Dynamic DNS. These organisations offer you your own static IP host name (e.g. mojo.monkeynuts.com) instead of a number, keep track of your changing IP address and linking it to the new host name. From what I can gather, your modem needs to support (have an in-built client for…) these DDNS services. As an example, two companies are No-IP andDynDNS.com. Please note that I haven’t used those two, they are just offered as examples.

Now, to find your IP address… usually this can be found by logging into your router’s administration page – it is usually 192.168.0.1 but could be different. Check with your supplier or ISP if they supplied the hardware. For this example, if I enter 10.1.1.1 in a web browser, and after entering my modem administration password, the following screen is presented:

WAN IP address router

What you are looking for is your WAN IP address, as you can see in the image above. To keep the pranksters away, I have blacked out some of my address.

The next thing to do is turn on port-forwarding. This tells the router where to redirect incoming requests from the outside world. When the modem receives such a request, we want to send that request to the port number of our Ethernet shield. Using the:

EthernetServer server(125);

function in our sketch has set the port number to 125. Each modem’s configuration screen will look different, but as an example here is one:

Arduino router port forwarding

So you can see from the line number one in the image above, the inbound port numbers have been set to 125, and the IP address of the Ethernet shield has been set to 10.1.1.77 – the same as in the sketch.

After saving the settings, we’re all set. The external address of my Ethernet shield will be the WAN:125, so to access the Arduino I will type my WAN address with :125 at the end into the browser of the remote web device, which will contact the lonely Ethernet hardware back home.

Furthermore, you may need to alter your modem’s firewall settings, to allow the port 125 to be “open” to incoming requests. Please check your modem documentation for more information on how to do this.

Now from basically any Internet connected device in the free world, I can enter my WAN and port number into the URL field and receive the results. For example, from a phone when it is connected to the Internet via LTE mobile data:

Arduino webserver example cellular

So at this stage you can now display data on a simple web page created by your Arduino and access it from anywhere with unrestricted Internet access. With your previous Arduino knowledge (well, this is chapter sixteen) you can now use data from sensors or other parts of a sketch and display it for retrieval.

Displaying sensor data on a web page

As an example of displaying sensor data on a web page, let’s use an inexpensive and popular temperature and humidity sensor – the DHT22. You will need to install the DHT22 Arduino library which can be found on this page. If this is your first time with the DHT22, experiment with the example sketch that’s included with the library so you understand how it works.

Connect the DHT22 with the data pin to Arduino D2, Vin to the 5V pin and GND to … GND:

arduino ethernet freetronics etherten dht22 humid

Now for our sketch – to display the temperature and humidity on a web page. If you’re not up on HTML you can use online services such as this to generate the code, which you can then modify to use in the sketch.

In the example below, the temperature and humidity data from the DHT22 is served in a simple web page:

#include <SPI.h>
#include <Ethernet.h>

// for DHT22 sensor
#include "DHT.h"
#define DHTPIN 2
#define DHTTYPE DHT22

// Enter a MAC address and IP address for your controller below.
// The IP address will be dependent on your local network:
byte mac[] = {   0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED };
IPAddress ip(10,1,1,77);

// Initialize the Ethernet server library
// with the IP address and port you want to use 
// (port 80 is default for HTTP):
EthernetServer server(125);
DHT dht(DHTPIN, DHTTYPE);

void setup() 
{
  dht.begin();
 // Open serial communications and wait for port to open:
  Serial.begin(9600);
   while (!Serial) {
    ; // wait for serial port to connect. Needed for Leonardo only
  }
  // start the Ethernet connection and the server:
  Ethernet.begin(mac, ip);
  server.begin();
  Serial.print("server is at ");
  Serial.println(Ethernet.localIP());
}

void loop() 
{
  // listen for incoming clients
  EthernetClient client = server.available();
  if (client) {
    Serial.println("new client");
    // an http request ends with a blank line
    boolean currentLineIsBlank = true;
    while (client.connected()) {
      if (client.available()) {
        char c = client.read();
        Serial.write(c);
        // if you've gotten to the end of the line (received a newline
        // character) and the line is blank, the http request has ended,
        // so you can send a reply
        if (c == 'n' && currentLineIsBlank) 
        {
          // send a standard http response header
          client.println("HTTP/1.1 200 OK");
          client.println("Content-Type: text/html");
          client.println("Connection: close");  // the connection will be closed after completion of the response
	  client.println("Refresh: 30");  // refresh the page automatically every 30 sec
          client.println();
          client.println("<!DOCTYPE HTML>");
          client.println("<html>");

          // get data from DHT22 sensor
          float h = dht.readHumidity();
          float t = dht.readTemperature();
          Serial.println(t);
          Serial.println(h);

          // from here we can enter our own HTML code to create the web page
          client.print("<head><title>Office Weather</title></head><body><h1>Office Temperature</h1><p>Temperature - ");
          client.print(t);
          client.print(" degrees Celsius</p>");
          client.print("<p>Humidity - ");
          client.print(h);
          client.print(" percent</p>");
          client.print("<p><em>Page refreshes every 30 seconds.</em></p></body></html>");
          break;
        }
        if (c == 'n') {
          // you're starting a new line
          currentLineIsBlank = true;
        } 
        else if (c != 'r') {
          // you've gotten a character on the current line
          currentLineIsBlank = false;
        }
      }
    }
    // give the web browser time to receive the data
    delay(1);
    // close the connection:
    client.stop();
    Serial.println("client disonnected");
  }
}

It is a modification of the IDE’s webserver example sketch that we used previously – with a few modifications. First, the webpage will automatically refresh every 30 seconds – this parameter is set in the line:

client.println("Refresh: 30");  // refresh the page automatically every 30 sec

… and the custom HTML for our web page starts below the line:

// from here we can enter our own HTML code to create the web page

You can then simply insert the required HTML inside client.print() functions to create the layout you need.

Finally – here’s an example screen shot of the example sketch at work:

arduino ethernet freetronics etherten dht22 humid cellular

You now have the framework to create your own web pages that can display various data processed with your Arduino.

Remote control your Arduino from afar

We have a separate tutorial on this topic, that uses the teleduino system.

Conclusion

So there you have it, another useful way to have your Arduino interact with the outside world. Stay tuned for upcoming Arduino tutorials by subscribing to the blog, RSS feed (top-right), twitter or joining our Google Group. And if you enjoyed the tutorial, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

tronixstuff

Ago
09

Introduction

If you’re awake and an Internet user, sooner or later  you’ll come across the concept of the “Internet of Things”. It is the goal of many people and organisations to have everything connected to everything for the exchange of data and the ability to control things. And as time marches on, more systems (or “platforms”) are appearing on the market. Some can be quite complex, and some are very easy to use – and this is where our interests lay. In the past we’ve examined the teleduino system, watched the rise of Ninja Blocks, and other connected devices like the lifx bulb and more.

However the purpose of this article is to demonstrate a new platform – XOBXOB (pronounced “zob-zob”) that gives users (and Arduino users in particular) a method of having remote devices connect with each other and be controlled over the Internet. At the time of writing XOBXOB is still in alpha stage, however you’re free to give it a go. So let’s do that now with Arduino.

Getting Started

You’ll need an Arduino and Ethernet shield – or a combination board such as a Freetronics EtherTen, or a WiFly board from Sparkfun. If you don’t have any Ethernet hardware there is a small application you can download that gives your USB-connected Arduino a link to the XOBXOB service. However before that, visit the XOBXOB homepage and register for an account. From there you can visit the dashboard which has your unique API key and a few controls:

XOBXOB dashboard

Now download the Arduino libraries and copy them into the usual location. If you don’t have an Ethernet shield, also get the “connector” application (available for all three OSs). The connector application is used after uploading the XOBXOB-enabled sketches to your Arduino and links it to the XOBXOB service.

Testing with exanples

Moving on, we’ve started with the basic LED control Ethernet sketch which is included in the XOBXOB library. It’s a fast way to check the system is working and your Internet connection is suitable. When using the examples for the first time (or any other XOBXOB sketch, don’t forget to enter your API key and Ethernet MAC address, for example:

byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0x12, 0x01 };
String APIKey = "cc6zzzzz-0494-4cd7-98a6-62cf21aqqqqq";

We have the EtherTen connected to the ADSL and control via a cellular phone. It’s set to control digital pin 8 so after inserting an LED it worked first time:

The LED is simply turned on and off by using the ON/OFF panel on the XOBXOB dashboard, and then clicking “SET”. You can also click “GET” to retrieve the status of the digital output. The GET function is useful if more than one person is logged into the dashboard controlling what’s at the other end.

Now for some more fun with the other included example, which controls a MAX7219 LED display driver IC. We used one of the boards from the MAX7219 test a while back, which worked fine with the XOBXOB example in the Arduino library:

If this example doesn’t compile for you, remove the line:

#include <"avr/pgmspace.h">

Once operating, this example is surprisingly fun, and could be built into a small enclosure for a simple remote-messaging system.

Controlling your own projects

The functions are explained in the Arduino library guide, which you should download and review. Going back to the LED blink example, you can see how the sketch gets and checks for a new on/off message in the following code:

if (!lastResponseReceived && XOB.loadStreamedResponse()) {

    lastResponseReceived = true;

    String LED = XOB.getMessage("switch");
    if (LED == "\"ON\"") {
      digitalWrite (8, HIGH);
    } 
    else {
      digitalWrite (8, LOW);
    }

So instead of the digitalWrite() functions, you can insert whatever you want to happen when the ON/OFF button is used on the XOBXOB dashboard.  For example with the use of a Powerswitch Tail you could control a house light or other device from afar.

If you want to control more than one device from the dashboard, you need to create another XOB. This is done by entering the “advanced” dashboard and clicking “New”. After entering a name for the new XOB it will then appear in the drop-down list in either dashboard page. To then assign that XOB to a new device, it needs to be told to request that XOB by name in the Arduino sketch.

For example, if you created a new XOB called “garagelight” you need to insert the XOB name in the XOB.requestXOB() function in the sketch:

XOB.requestXOB("garagelight");

and then it will respond to the dashboard when required. Later on we’ll return to XOBXOB and examine how to upload information from a device to the dashboard, to allow remote monitoring of temperature and other data.

Conclusion

Experimenting with XOBXOB was a lot of fun, and much easier than originally planned. Although only in the beginning stages, I’m sure it can find a use with your hardware and a little imagination. Note that XOBXOB is still in alpha stage and not a finished product. For more information, visit hte XOBXOB website. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Arduino and the XOBXOB IoT Platform appeared first on tronixstuff.

Ago
09

Introduction

If you’re awake and an Internet user, sooner or later  you’ll come across the concept of the “Internet of Things”. It is the goal of many people and organisations to have everything connected to everything for the exchange of data and the ability to control things. And as time marches on, more systems (or “platforms”) are appearing on the market. Some can be quite complex, and some are very easy to use – and this is where our interests lay. In the past we’ve examined the teleduino system, watched the rise of Ninja Blocks, and other connected devices like the lifx bulb and more.

However the purpose of this article is to demonstrate a new platform – XOBXOB (pronounced “zob-zob”) that gives users (and Arduino users in particular) a method of having remote devices connect with each other and be controlled over the Internet. At the time of writing XOBXOB is still in alpha stage, however you’re free to give it a go. So let’s do that now with Arduino.

Getting Started

You’ll need an Arduino and Ethernet shield – or a combination board such as a Freetronics EtherTen, or a WiFly board from Sparkfun. If you don’t have any Ethernet hardware there is a small application you can download that gives your USB-connected Arduino a link to the XOBXOB service. However before that, visit the XOBXOB homepage and register for an account. From there you can visit the dashboard which has your unique API key and a few controls:

XOBXOB dashboard

Now download the Arduino libraries and copy them into the usual location. If you don’t have an Ethernet shield, also get the “connector” application (available for all three OSs). The connector application is used after uploading the XOBXOB-enabled sketches to your Arduino and links it to the XOBXOB service.

Testing with exanples

Moving on, we’ve started with the basic LED control Ethernet sketch which is included in the XOBXOB library. It’s a fast way to check the system is working and your Internet connection is suitable. When using the examples for the first time (or any other XOBXOB sketch, don’t forget to enter your API key and Ethernet MAC address, for example:

byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0x12, 0x01 };
String APIKey = "cc6zzzzz-0494-4cd7-98a6-62cf21aqqqqq";

We have the EtherTen connected to the ADSL and control via a cellular phone. It’s set to control digital pin 8 so after inserting an LED it worked first time:

The LED is simply turned on and off by using the ON/OFF panel on the XOBXOB dashboard, and then clicking “SET”. You can also click “GET” to retrieve the status of the digital output. The GET function is useful if more than one person is logged into the dashboard controlling what’s at the other end.

Now for some more fun with the other included example, which controls a MAX7219 LED display driver IC. We used one of the boards from the MAX7219 test a while back, which worked fine with the XOBXOB example in the Arduino library:

If this example doesn’t compile for you, remove the line:

#include <"avr/pgmspace.h">

Once operating, this example is surprisingly fun, and could be built into a small enclosure for a simple remote-messaging system.

Controlling your own projects

The functions are explained in the Arduino library guide, which you should download and review. Going back to the LED blink example, you can see how the sketch gets and checks for a new on/off message in the following code:

if (!lastResponseReceived && XOB.loadStreamedResponse()) {

    lastResponseReceived = true;

    String LED = XOB.getMessage("switch");
    if (LED == "\"ON\"") {
      digitalWrite (8, HIGH);
    } 
    else {
      digitalWrite (8, LOW);
    }

So instead of the digitalWrite() functions, you can insert whatever you want to happen when the ON/OFF button is used on the XOBXOB dashboard.  For example with the use of a Powerswitch Tail you could control a house light or other device from afar.

If you want to control more than one device from the dashboard, you need to create another XOB. This is done by entering the “advanced” dashboard and clicking “New”. After entering a name for the new XOB it will then appear in the drop-down list in either dashboard page. To then assign that XOB to a new device, it needs to be told to request that XOB by name in the Arduino sketch.

For example, if you created a new XOB called “garagelight” you need to insert the XOB name in the XOB.requestXOB() function in the sketch:

XOB.requestXOB("garagelight");

and then it will respond to the dashboard when required. Later on we’ll return to XOBXOB and examine how to upload information from a device to the dashboard, to allow remote monitoring of temperature and other data.

Conclusion

Experimenting with XOBXOB was a lot of fun, and much easier than originally planned. Although only in the beginning stages, I’m sure it can find a use with your hardware and a little imagination. Note that XOBXOB is still in alpha stage and not a finished product. For more information, visit hte XOBXOB website. And if you made it this far – check out my new book “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Arduino and the XOBXOB IoT Platform appeared first on tronixstuff.

Giu
12

Interact with Arduino over the Internet with Teleduino

api, arduino, control, ethernet, etherten, freetronics, internet, ip, remote, teleduino Commenti disabilitati su Interact with Arduino over the Internet with Teleduino 

Introduction

Recently a new method of interacting with an ethernet-enabled Arduino board and the Internet was brought to my attention – a new system called Teleduino. In this article we test a few of the basic features and see what is possible. Please note that these are my own experiments and that Teleduino is a work in progress. So follow along and see for yourself.

Getting Started

  1. You will need an Arduino Uno (or compatible) board and Ethernet shield with the Wiznet chip – or a Freetronics EtherTen (a much neater solution). At this stage Teleduino doesn’t support other boards such as the Mega.
  2. Download and install the Teleduino Arduino library. This is available from the resources section of the home page. You will also need to be running Arduino IDE v1.0 or greater.
  3. Request an API key. This identified your particular Arduino from the rest.
  4. Get together some basic electronics components for testing, such as some LEDs and 560R resistors; sources of analog input such as an LDR or TMP36 temperature sensor; and a solderless breadboard.
  5. Don’t forget the ethernet cable from your Arduino stack to the router!
  6. Finally, some rudimentary knowledge about networking will be useful. (IP address, DHCP, etc.)
The Teleduino system uses pin D8 for a status LED, so you may find connecting one up now useful while experimenting. Connect as such:

Controlling digital outputs

In this example we control an LED, turning it on and off. For demonstration purposes, connect another LED with a resistor to D6 in the same method as shown above. Next, you need to upload a sketch to the Arduino. It is the
TeleduinoEthernetClientProxy.ino

which is included with the library examples. Before uploading, you need to make some modifications. The first of these is to add your API key. Go back to the email you received from Teleduino, and click on the link provided. It will take you to a website that shows a byte array variable named byte key[]. You will copy this into the sketch, replacing the same array full of hexadecimal zeros in the sketch – as shown below – with your own:

Next, scroll down to

byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED };

… and change one of the hexadecimal numbers to 0×00… just in case there is a clash with other addresses on your network. You never know. Finally – depending on your network router, you may need to manually allocate the IP address for your Ethernet shield and/or set the DNS server to use. To do this, scroll down to

// User configurable variables

where you can change the useDHCP and/or useDNS variables to false, and update those values below. However if you’re not sure, just leave them be unless you need to change them. Finally – upload the sketch to your Arduino, get the hardware together and plug it into the network.

Watch your status LED – it will blink a number of times, depending on the status of things. The blink levels are:

  • 1 blink – initialising
  • 2 blinks – starting network connection
  • 3 blinks – connecting to the Teleduino server
  • 4 blinks – authentication successful
  • 5 blinks – session already exists for supplied key (sometimes happens after a quick restart – will work on next auto-restart)
  • 6 blinks – Invalid or unauthorised key – check your API key is correctly entered in the sketch as described earlier
  • 10 blinks – connection dropped

If all is well, after a minute yours should be on blink level 4, then it will idle back to blink level 1. Now to test the connection with our first command.

You send commands to the Arduino using a set of URLs that will contain various parameters. You will need your API key again for these URLs which is then inserted into the URL. The first will report the version of software on the Arduino. Send

http://us01.proxy.teleduino.org/api/1.0/328.php?k=999999&r=getVersion

however replace 999999 with your API key (and in all examples shown here). If successful, you should see something similar to the following in the web browser:

However if something is wrong, or there are connection difficulties you will see something like:

Before using digital outputs, and after every reset of the Arduino) you need to set the pin mode for the digital output to control. In our example, we use:

http://us01.proxy.teleduino.org/api/1.0/328.php?k=999999&r=definePinMode&pin=6&mode=1

Note that the pin number and mode are set with single digits, as you can see above this is for pin 6, and we use mode=1 for output. You should save this as a bookmark to make life easer later on. When the command has been successfully sent, a message will be shown in the webpage, for example:

Moving forward – you turn the digital output on with the following:

http://us01.proxy.teleduino.org/api/1.0/328.php?k=999999&r=setDigitalOutput&pin=6&output=1

and to turn it off, set the final part of the URL to

output=0

Easy. How did you go? It really is amazing to see it work. Now you can control your Arduino from almost anywhere in the world. Again, saving these as bookmarks to make things easier, or a URL shortening service.

At this point you should now have the gist of the Teleduino service and how it is operated.

There is so much more you can do, and currently the list includes (From the author):

  • Reset, ping, get version, get uptime, get free memory.
  • Define pin modes, set digital outputs, set analog outputs, read digital inputs, read analog inputs, or read all inputs with a single API call.
  • Define up to 2 ‘banks’ of shift registers. Each ‘bank’ can contain up to 32 cascaded shift registers, giving a total of 512 digital outputs.
  • Shift register outputs can be set, or merged, and expire times can be set on merges (you could set an output(s) high for X number of milliseconds).
  • Define, and read and write from serial port.
  • Read and write from EEPROM.
  • Define and position up to 6 servos.
  • Set preset values for the above functions, which get set during boot. Preset values are stored in the first 160ish bytes of the EEPROM.

[22/09/2012] New! You can also control the I2C bus – check out this tutorial for more information.

For more information check the Teleduino web site, and further tutorials can be found here. Here is a simple example of Teleduino at work – controlling a light switch:

Conclusion

At this moment Teleduino is simple, works and makes a lot of ideas possible. We look forward to making more use of it in future projects, and hope you can as well. Kudos to Nathan Kennedy, and we look forward to seeing Teleduino advance and develop over the future. If all this Arduino is new to you, check out the tutorials.  Thanks to Freetronics for the use of their Ethernet-enabled hardware.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Giu
12

Interact with Arduino over the Internet with Teleduino

api, arduino, control, ethermega, ethernet, etherten, freetronics, internet, ip, lesson, remote, teleduino, tutorial Commenti disabilitati su Interact with Arduino over the Internet with Teleduino 

Introduction

Recently a new method of interacting with an ethernet-enabled Arduino board and the Internet was brought to my attention – a new system called Teleduino. In this article we test a few of the basic features and see what is possible. Please note that these are my own experiments and that Teleduino is a work in progress. So follow along and see for yourself.

Getting Started

  1. You will need an Arduino Uno (or compatible) board and Ethernet shield with the Wiznet chip – or a Freetronics EtherTen (a much neater solution). Teleduino now supports Arduino Mega and the awesome EtherMega.
  2. Download and install the Teleduino Arduino library. This is available from the resources section of the home page. You will also need to be running Arduino IDE v1.0 or greater.
  3. Request an API key. This identified your particular Arduino from the rest.
  4. Get together some basic electronics components for testing, such as some LEDs and 560R resistors; sources of analog input such as an LDR or TMP36 temperature sensor; and a solderless breadboard.
  5. Don’t forget the ethernet cable from your Arduino stack to the router!
  6. Finally, some rudimentary knowledge about networking will be useful. (IP address, DHCP, etc.)
The Teleduino system uses pin D8 for a status LED, so you may find connecting one up now useful while experimenting. Connect as such:

Controlling digital outputs

In this example we control an LED, turning it on and off. For demonstration purposes, connect another LED with a resistor to D6 in the same method as shown above. Next, you need to upload a sketch to the Arduino. It is the

which is included with the library examples. Before uploading, you need to make some modifications. The first of these is to add your API key. Go back to the email you received from Teleduino, and click on the link provided. It will take you to a website that shows a byte array variable named byte key[]. You will copy this into the sketch, replacing the same array full of hexadecimal zeros in the sketch – as shown below – with your own:

Next, scroll down to

… and change one of the hexadecimal numbers to 0×00… just in case there is a clash with other addresses on your network. You never know. Finally – depending on your network router, you may need to manually allocate the IP address for your Ethernet shield and/or set the DNS server to use. To do this, scroll down to

where you can change the useDHCP and/or useDNS variables to false, and update those values below. However if you’re not sure, just leave them be unless you need to change them. Finally – upload the sketch to your Arduino, get the hardware together and plug it into the network.

Watch your status LED – it will blink a number of times, depending on the status of things. The blink levels are:

  • 1 blink – initialising
  • 2 blinks – starting network connection
  • 3 blinks – connecting to the Teleduino server
  • 4 blinks – authentication successful
  • 5 blinks – session already exists for supplied key (sometimes happens after a quick restart – will work on next auto-restart)
  • 6 blinks – Invalid or unauthorised key – check your API key is correctly entered in the sketch as described earlier
  • 10 blinks – connection dropped

If all is well, after a minute yours should be on blink level 4, then it will idle back to blink level 1. Now to test the connection with our first command.

You send commands to the Arduino using a set of URLs that will contain various parameters. You will need your API key again for these URLs which is then inserted into the URL. The first will report the version of software on the Arduino. Send

however replace 999999 with your API key (and in all examples shown here). If successful, you should see something similar to the following in the web browser:

However if something is wrong, or there are connection difficulties you will see something like:

Before using digital outputs, and after every reset of the Arduino) you need to set the pin mode for the digital output to control. In our example, we use:

Note that the pin number and mode are set with single digits, as you can see above this is for pin 6, and we use mode=1 for output. You should save this as a bookmark to make life easer later on. When the command has been successfully sent, a message will be shown in the webpage, for example:

Moving forward – you turn the digital output on with the following:

and to turn it off, set the final part of the URL to

Easy. How did you go? It really is amazing to see it work. Now you can control your Arduino from almost anywhere in the world. Again, saving these as bookmarks to make things easier, or a URL shortening service.

At this point you should now have the gist of the Teleduino service and how it is operated.

There is so much more you can do, and currently the list includes (From the author):

  • Reset, ping, get version, get uptime, get free memory.
  • Define pin modes, set digital outputs, set analog outputs, read digital inputs, read analog inputs, or read all inputs with a single API call.
  • Define up to 2 ‘banks’ of shift registers. Each ‘bank’ can contain up to 32 cascaded shift registers, giving a total of 512 digital outputs.
  • Shift register outputs can be set, or merged, and expire times can be set on merges (you could set an output(s) high for X number of milliseconds).
  • Define, and read and write from serial port.
  • Read and write from EEPROM.
  • Define and position up to 6 servos.
  • Set preset values for the above functions, which get set during boot. Preset values are stored in the first 160ish bytes of the EEPROM.

[22/09/2012] New! You can also control the I2C bus – check out this tutorial for more information. For more information check the Teleduino web site, and further tutorials can be found here. Here is a simple example of Teleduino at work – controlling a light switch:

Conclusion

At this moment Teleduino is simple, works and makes a lot of ideas possible. We look forward to making more use of it in future projects, and hope you can as well. Kudos to Nathan Kennedy, and we look forward to seeing Teleduino advance and develop over the future. If all this Arduino is new to you, check out the tutorials.  Thanks to Freetronics for the use of their Ethernet-enabled hardware.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Interact with Arduino over the Internet with Teleduino appeared first on tronixstuff.



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