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Arduino SIM: 10MB Free Data for Up to 90 Days!

The new Arduino SIM offers the simplest path to cellular IoT device development in an environment familiar to millions. The cellular service, provided by Arm Pelion Connectivity Management, has a global roaming profile; meaning a single Arduino SIM can be used in over 100 countries worldwide with one simple data plan.

The Plan

  • Arduino SIM comes with 10 MB of data free for the first days 90 days,
  • One simple subscription at 5 MB for $1.50 USD per month*.
  • Global roaming profile – enjoy the same amount of data traffic for the same price wherever you are operating the device around the world.
  • Cellular connectivity to the Arduino IoT Cloud – monitor and control your devices anytime, anywhere.
  • Ideal for connected devices on the go or in areas without reliable WiFi.

*The monthly Arduino SIM plan is currently only available to U.S. residents

By partnering with Arm Pelion Connectivity Management, the cellular service has a solid foundation for users needing to scale form a single to large numbers of devices in the future.

At launch, the Arduino SIM will allow users to send data into the Arduino IoT Cloud, while later in the year they will also be able to use the Arduino SIM to connect to the Internet via a combination of webhooks and APIs.

Arduino SIM is initially rolling out with support for the Arduino MKR GSM 1400 (3G with 2G fallback) – a 32-bit Arduino board supporting TLS and X.509 certificate-based authentication through an on-board secure element and crypto-accelerator. Arduino IoT Cloud makes it possible for anyone to connect to these boards securely without any coding required, but they are still programmable using open-source libraries and the traditional Arduino IDE.  

Now available to pre-order from the Arduino U.S. Store!

We are very happy to announce the Arduino PRO Gateway for LoRa!

Combined with Arduino MKR WAN 1300 IoT nodes, it makes an ideal solution for a wide range of applications, like smart agriculture, smart cities and building automation – and many other remote monitoring use cases requiring long range, low power wireless connectivity.

The gateway can be used globally and enables multiple channel management. By supporting advanced features like Listen Before Talk (LBT), it allows users to transmit at higher power on the first free channel, achieving longer ranges than conventional gateways for LoRa. 

Arduino continues its mission of making complex technology easy enough for anyone to use. Customers of the Arduino PRO Gateway will be given exclusive beta access to the Arduino IoT Cloud, which makes installation, provisioning and remote management of the gateway incredibly simple through the popular Arduino Create cloud platform.

The gateway features the advanced Embit EMB-LR1301-mPCIe module, hosted by a Raspberry Pi 3 B+ SBC, in a rugged aluminum enclosure. The gateway comes pre-installed with an optimized packet forwarder and a carrier grade Network server for LoRa WAN that is running on the Arduino Cloud provided by A2A Smart City (part of the A2A Group).

Technical Specifications

  • Chipset: Semtech SX1301
  • Modulation: LoRa Spread Spectrum, FSK, GFSK 868MHz (EU) / 915MHz (US)
  • Number of Channels: 8 LoRa Channels
  • Operating Frequency: 868MHz (EU) / 915MHz (US)
  • Frequency Range: 860MHz to 1020MHz
  • Operating Temperature: -40°C to +85°C
  • RF Output Power: Up to +27dBm
  • Sensitivity: Up to -137dBm
  • Interfaces for the LoRa Module:  mPCIe (SPI / I2C / UART / GPIOs) :
  • Dimensions: 71x40x1mm
  • Operating Voltage: +5V
  • Additional Features:
    • Listen Before Talk (LBT) Capability (for improved transmission power management),
    • On-board uFL antenna connector
    • FPGA support for LoRa Spectral Scan

 

The Arduino Pro Gateway for LoRa (868 MHz , EU version) can be pre-ordered from the Arduino Store.

Mar
11

Dive into the Internet-of-Things world with the new Arduino GSM Shield

Announcements, arduino, gsm, Hardware, New, New Product, shield Commenti disabilitati su Dive into the Internet-of-Things world with the new Arduino GSM Shield 

Arduino Gsm Shield

We are excited to announce that the new Arduino GSM Shield is ready to be shipped allowing Arduino boards (Uno, MEGA and Leonardo) to explore the wonders of adding a GPRS/GSM connection to interactive projects.

We teamed up with Telefónica Digital to design a tool that is greatly simplifying the process of building Internet of Things applications based on the GSM mobile phone network and controlled through the internet anywhere there is mobile phone coverage.

 

 

Every shield is equipped with a SIM card ready to be plugged in and used within a special worldwide data tariff especially created for the product by Telefónica but you can use any SIM from other providers.
As you can see from the video above, the activation process is really simple and fast through the BlueVia website where you can login with your Arduino account and be online in minutes!

Then you can easily implement features like
- make/receive calls: plug a sound speaker at the connector at the bottom of your shield and you can get your board to play the sound while you make/receive voice calls.
- send/receive SMS: when a sensor reaches a threshold your Arduino can text any number or remotely activate a device.

If you want to hear more about the GSM Shield directly from David Cuartielles, have a look at this video:

 

 

You can put your hands on the new Arduino GSM Shield from today directly from our store and from the 25th of March also from all the other distributors.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and G+ and when you create something great with it, don’t forget to share it with us: submit your project here.

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Share the news with these Hashtags: #gsmshield #arduino

Take a look at the pics:

 

Ott
22

Arduino 1.5: support for the Due and other processors, easier library installation, simplified board menu, etc.

New, Software Commenti disabilitati su Arduino 1.5: support for the Due and other processors, easier library installation, simplified board menu, etc. 

The new Arduino 1.5 software brings a number of improvements, some in support of the new Arduino Due board and others to make it easier to install libraries and to simplify the boards menu. While these new features should work well, we expect to get lots of feedback and to iterate on them in future releases of the Arduino software. That also applies to the new (experimental) libraries for the Due, which add features like USB Host, audio playback, and cooperative scheduling. In the short-term, if you’re not using the Due, you might want to stick with the current 1.0.x (AVR-only) releases of the Arduino software; Arduino 1.0.2 will be out shortly. In the long-term, though, we’re going to be basing the Arduino software on the Arduino 1.5 code. Here’s an overview of the improvements and changes it contains.

Support for Multiple Microcontroller Architectures and Toolchains

While the interface for compiling and uploading sketches remains the same, we’ve made some significant changes under the hood in order to support the new 32-bit, Atmel SAM3X ARM processor on the Due. The new Arduino environment (IDE) can now be configured to target multiple processor architectures, each with its own toolchain and compilation process. To support a new processor family, the core language and libraries need to be ported (as we’ve done for the Due) and some configuration files edited to specify the commands for compilation and uploading. We’ve focused on ensuring that this new system works seamlessly for the Due and our existing AVR-based boards, but with some tweaks and improvements, we imagine that it will allow the Arduino environment to work with many, many more microcontrollers. We’ll be posting more details of this new system soon but, for now, you can look at the “avr” and “sam” directories in the Arduino software for an idea of how it works.

Note: the changes to the underlying configuration files means that older “third-party hardware” folders will require some tweaking to work with Arduino 1.5. We’ll try to improve backwards compatibility in future versions of the software but, for now, you’ll need to work with makers of third-party hardware to update their files for Arduino 1.5.

Easier Library Installation

Arduino 1.5 makes it easier to install libraries. We’ve added a new “Add Library…” menu item (inside of “Sketch > Import Library…”) that prompts you select a library zip file or folder on your computer. It then copies it to your sketchbook folder and adds it to the list of installed libraries. You can still install libraries manually but this is a simpler alternative.

Simplified Boards Menu

With the addition of the Due, the boards menu in the Arduino software was getting so long that we decided to simplify it. To do so, we’ve separated the choice of the board itself from that of the processor (microcontroller) on it. For example, if you’re using an Arduino Mega with an ATmega1280, select “Arduino Mega” from the boards menu and “ATmega1280″ from the processor menu. To make things easier, the processor menu defaults to the microcontroller on the most recent version of the selected board. So if you have an Arduino Mega with an ATmega2560, you can simply select “Arduino Mega” from the boards menu and the processor menu will default to the appropriate item (“2560 or ADK”). If the selected board only has one processor option, the processor menu will be disabled. (For example, every Leonardo board comes with an ATmega32U4.) We hope this makes it a little easier to find and select the board you’re using.

 

We want to hear your feedback about Arduino 1.5 and its new features. For general suggestions and discussion, you can post on the Arduino forum. If you find a bug, please add it to the Google Code issues list. If you’d like to get more deeply involved in the development of the Arduino software, subscribe to the developers mailing list. We’re planning to iterate on the software and its features, so look for Arduino 1.5.1 and other releases to come soon.

Finally, I want to talk about the people who have made this release possible. Cristian Maglie has led the development of the Arduino 1.5 software and has done an incredible job. In the last few weeks, Cristian and I have been ably assisted by Federico Fissore, a Java developer also based in Italy who’s banged out a number of features. The multiple-platform code in Arduino 1.5 was initially based on work by Rick Anderson. And, again, the Due itself is the product of work by a number of additional people, as mentioned in our previous post about the board. Thanks to everyone!

Ott
22

Arduino Due is finally here

Hardware, New Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Due is finally here 

Today we release the latest addition to the Arduino family: the Arduino Due

This board is based on a powerful 32bit CortexM3 ARM microcontroller made programmable through the familiar Arduino API and its development environment. It’s an important step forward for Arduino as it increases the computing power available to Arduino users keeping the language as compatible as possible so that many programs will be migrated in a matter of minutes.

You can read all about the geeky details on the Arduino Due product page.

There are some things to be considered while approaching this new platform:

  • It’s quite new so expect bugs and issues, but the code is in our github repository and we welcome any suggestion or patch.
  • The AVR and ARM processors are quite different and a lot of the code that made low level access to the AVR registers won’t run on the new code without some adaptations.
  • The processor, like all other in this class, runs at 3.3v therefore all the shields that fully implement the Arduino R3 layout are compatible straight away (like our wifi shield and our eth shield) but other 3rd party shield might not be compatible. if you have doubts ask your supplier and they will be able to tell you.
  • It has a new IDE v1.5 that can compile both for AVR and ARM. After a period of testing and debuggin this will replace the 1.0.1 we supply at the moment. On this blog there is a post describing in more detail what’s new.
  • It has some cool features like DACs, Audio, DMA , an experimental multi tasking library and more. check it out and let us know what you think.

I hope you’re all excited about this new product like we are and will join us in learning how to make the best of this new powerful product we have made available.

 

 



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