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Archive for the ‘Parallax’ Category

Seems like just about every hackerspace eventually ends up with an old vending machine that gets hacked and modded to serve up parts, tools, and consumables. But why don’t more hackerspaces build their own vending machines from scratch? Because as [Ryan Bates] found out, building a DIY vending machine isn’t as easy as it looks.

[Ryan]’s “Venduino” has a lot of hackerspace standard components – laser-cut birch plywood case, Parallax continuous rotation servos, an LCD screen from an old Nokia phone, and of course an Arduino. The design is simple, but the devil is in the details. The machine makes no attempt to validate the coins going into it, the product augurs are not quite optimized to dispense reliably, and the whole machine can be cleaned out of product with a few quick shakes. Granted, [Ryan] isn’t trying to build a reliable money-making machine, but his travails only underscore the quality engineering behind modern vending machines. It might not seem like it when your Cheetos are dangling from the end of an auger, but think about how many successful transactions the real things process in an environment with a lot of variables.

Of course, every failure mode is just something to improve in the next version, but as it is this is still a neat project with some great ideas. If you’re more interested in the workings of commercial machines, check out our posts on listening in on vending machine comms or a Tweeting vending machine.

[via r/arduino]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, misc hacks
Lug
18

Quick and Dirty RFID Door Locks Clean up Nice

access control, arduino, arduino hacks, Atmega-328, door lock, microcontrollers, Parallax, Relay, rfid, rfid reader Commenti disabilitati su Quick and Dirty RFID Door Locks Clean up Nice 

homemade RFID Door Locks

[Shawn] recently overhauled his access control by fitting the doors with some RFID readers. Though the building already had electronic switches in place, unlocking the doors required mashing an aging keypad or pestering someone in an adjacent office to press a button to unlock them for you. [Shawn] tapped into that system by running some wires up into the attic and connecting them to one of two control boxes, each with an ATMega328 inside. Everything functions as you would expect: presenting the right RFID card to the wall-mounted reader sends a signal to the microcontroller, which clicks an accompanying relay that drives the locks.

You may recall [Shawn's] RFID phone tag hack from last month; the addition of the readers is the second act of the project. If you’re looking to recreate this build, you shouldn’t have any trouble sourcing the same Parallax readers or building out your own Arduino on a stick, either. Check out a quick walkthrough video after the jump.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Microcontrollers
Ott
25

Fire Breathing Jack-O-Lantern of Death

arduino hacks, fire, halloween, Holiday Hacks, jack o lantern, Parallax, PING, pumpkin Commenti disabilitati su Fire Breathing Jack-O-Lantern of Death 

fire_pumpkin

[Rick] is at it again, this week he has conjured up an even more dangerous Halloween hack. Thankfully [Rick] has included a warning of just how dangerous this hack can be, especially if children are around. Don’t do this hack unless you know what you’re doing and you can do it safely.

For [Rick]’s number four hack of the month he gives us the Fire Breathing Jack-O-Lantern of death! This isn’t a new idea but it is a very unique and simple implementation. We always love seeing the ingenuity of hackers to repurpose existing commercial products. In this case, [Rick] uses an automated air freshener which dispenses a flammable spray for the pumpkins breath if you dare get too close, but not so close as to get burned. The trigger distance is controlled by an Arduino and a Parallax Ping))) sensor so as to fire only when people are farther than 3 feet but closer than 5 feet. You can get a copy of the Arduino sketch from his blog posting.

A small candle is used to ignite the flammable spray, which shoots out 5 to 10 inches from the pumpkin’s mouth when triggered by the ultrasonic sensor. It couldn’t be simpler. The most challenging part was getting the large air freshener dispenser in the pumpkin with the flames coming out the mouth. A little extra whacking at the pumpkin fixed the fit, but planning for a larger pumpkin would be advised.

Theoretically the Arduino shouldn’t trigger and throw flames if people are too close, but when kids are running around they may come right into the target area unexpectedly. If this hack is used in the right place it would make for a great Halloween display item and could be used safely.

After the break you can watch [Rick’s] flame breathing Jack-o-Lantern build tutorial.

If you would like to see a voice controlled dragon pumpkin that throws flames whenever somebody says “trick or treat” then checkout this Microsoft Kinect voice recognition hack .


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Holiday Hacks

Halloween Dropping Spider

Halloween Dropping Spider

Contest Entry by Noel Portugal

My Halloween project consisted of a dropping spider triggered by a PIR motion sensor mounted on a Jackolantern. The motion sensor triggered a dropping spider, lights, sounds, low laying fog and finally a tweet with a picture attached.

Setup: It’s all pretty basic. The arduino controlled the PIR motion sensor, the servos for dropping spider reel, Jackolantern LED lights, toy with scary sound, and the X10 CM17A. Then the arduino sent a serial message to the ioBridge serial API telling to GET the URL of my site. Then on my site I had a bash script with a while loop looking for request coming from the ioBridge server, then the script played a sound, grab the picture from a wireless webcam and post it to twitter via twitpic’s API using cURL.

Arduino Halloween Dropping Spider

Arduino Halloween Dropping Spider

Arduino Sketch
Here is the arduino sketch. I used the X10Firecracker and the Servo libraries as well as the PIR sensor example from the arduino playground.

Spider Reel
I end up using an VHS tape as a reel. I had to modify one servo to have continuous rotation. I used this guide to do so. The second servo just did the lift part.

ioBridge Monitor
To establish the arduino-ioBridge serial communication I was planning to use an RF solution, but due to time constraints I had to use a long speaker cable to connect the arduino TX to ioBridge’s Serial Board RX with one wire and the second for GND.

This is the bash script I used to trigger a sound as well as send a twitpic.

  1. #!/bin/bash
  2. booCounter=$1
  3. while true;do
  4. status=`tail -n 1 /private/var/log/apache2/access_log | cut -f 1 -d "-"`
  5. if [ "$status" = "00.00.000.000 " ]
  6. then
  7. echo "Boo" >> /private/var/log/apache2/access_log
  8. afplay /full/path/Halloween/werewolf.mp3
  9. msg="Boo, victim $booCounter just got really scared"
  10. sleep 5
  11. curl -O http://www.mywebcam.com/IMAGE.JPG
  12. curl -F media=@/full/path/Halloween/IMAGE.JPG -F "username=username" -F "password=password" -F
  13. "message=$msg" http://twitpic.com/api/uploadAndPost
  14. let booCounter=booCounter+1
  15. fi
  16. done

I used my mac os x Apache 2 server. I had to give write permissions to the access_log so I could append a bogus line as a “break”.

These are the parts that I used for this project:

Arduino Duemilanove
o Adafruit Protoshield

ioBridge IO-204
o ioBridge Serial Smart Board

x10 Firecracker CM17A
o x10 Transeiver, Appliance and lamp modules

VHS tape
o 2 Futaba S3003 servos
o Nylon rope

Plastic Jackolantern
o Parallax PIR sensor
o 2 red LEDs
+ 2 1K resistors
o Checklane Yada Yada Yada (thanks Erick for the tip http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-controlled-Silly-String-shooter/)
+ 1 2N2222 tranisistor
+ 1 10k resistor

Fog Machine
o 125VAC/10A DPDT Plug-In Relay (as a switch combined with x10)
o Styrofoam cooler and dryer hose and Ice to create low laying fog.

Wireless webcam
Lights and accesories
o Incandescent black light, strobe light, black light bulbs.

Project Video:

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