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Archive for the ‘led coffee table’ Category

Rather than buying a coffee table, Marija from Creativity Hero decided to build her own, adding an array of 45 programmable LEDs on top of a pine base.

An Arduino Mega is used to take input from 45 sensors corresponding to each LED in a grid made with MDF baffles, and commands each light to change colors based on whether something is placed on that square section. The on/off colors used can be selected via a Bluetooth smartphone app, allowing you to customize the furniture to your liking.

This unique LED coffee table can create beautiful atmosphere and will be a real focal point in my living room. I wanted to make a simple design with some interesting features that will take my room to a whole new level. It is controlled via a custom-made Android application, so I can easily change the reactive color, or the background color, and I can even adjust the brightness.

You can find full details on the project here, as well as the tools and parts you’ll need.

Some hackers make functional things that you can’t allow to be seen in polite company. Others make beautiful things that could come from a high-end store. [Marija] falls into the second category and her interactive LED coffee table would probably fetch quite a bit on the retail market. You can see a video of the awesome-looking table, below.

It isn’t just the glass, MDF, and pine construction. There’s also a Bluetooth interface to a custom Android application from [Dejan], who collaborated on the project. However, if you aren’t comfortable with the woodworking, [Marija’s] instructions are very detailed with great pictures so this might be a good starter project.

On the electronics side, there are addressable LEDs (WS2812Bs), a Bluetooth module, IR proximity sensors, and an Arduino. The proximity sensors needed a little hacking so the sensor can mount in a way that it can detect things through the glass top.

This is one of those projects that really points out how some relatively simple components can combine with software and mechanical construction to really create an eye-popping result. We were really impressed with the documentation, too, and if you are unsure about how to do the woodworking or the electronics, you’ll find a great guide with helpful pictures.

Now, if you don’t hang out with polite company, but only other hackers, you’ll probably opt for an EPROM table. If you get hooked on lighting up tables, you can move on to the mega LED desk after you finish this project, although that’s more of a metal project.



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