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Unless you live in a special, unique place like Hawaii or Costa Rica it’s unlikely you’ll be able to surf every day. It’s not easy to plan surf sessions or even surf trips to most locations because the weather conditions will need to be just right. Not only the wave height (swell) but also the wind speed and direction, tide, water and air temperature, and even amount and type of marine life present can all impact your surf session. You’ll want something which can easily tell you right away if conditions are good.

This project from [luke] is called the Surf Window shows the surf conditions at the local beach with just one glance. Made out of various pieces of wood, each part represents one of the weather conditions at the beach. A rotating seagull gives the wind direction, for example, and the wave height is represented by 3D, moving waves. All of the parts are connected with various motors and linkages to an Arduino Mega +WiFi R3 which grabs all of its information from Magicseaweed, a surf forecasting site.

The Surf Window can show the current conditions at virtually any surfable beach in the world, so if you really want to know how Jaws, Mavericks, or even Reef Road is breaking right now, you could use this to give you a more nuanced look. Don’t forget to take the correct board for the conditions!

We admit, we see a lot of weather stations. What makes [Mike Diamond’s] take on this old favorite interesting is that it is tiny enough to carry with you, and uses your cell phone as a hotspot to deliver its data. Of course, that assumes you have a phone that can act as a hotspot.

The parts are straightforward, a power supply, an ESP8266, and a weather sensor board. It looks as though you could easily slip the whole affair into a tube or maybe a 3D printed enclosure. We were a little concerned about the bare wire used, but as [Mike] points out you can use insulated wire if you like, and we’d encourage you to do so.

There are some modifications required including removing the pin headers. [Mike] uses the old trick of smacking your hand on the table after melting the pins. You can also heat up each pin and pull it out with pliers. Or, if you have a hot air gun, get all the pins molten at once — just don’t heat up more of the board than you need.

On the data end, the ESP8266 uses Cayenne to transmit data which is the same kind of IoT backend we see a lot lately. On the one hand, this allows you to distribute it without developing a phone application. On the other hand, we would have been tempted to just make the ESP8266 a web server and populate a simple web page. Of course, you could still do that if you wanted to.

We’ve seen plenty of weather stations, but a lot of them are not nearly as compact. If you want to go old school, there’s always the TI 99/4A weather station.

Whether you’re lodged in an apartment with a poor view of the sky like [Becky Stern] or are looking for an at-a-glance report of the current weather, you might consider this minimalist weather display instead of checking your computer or your phone every time you’re headed out the door.

The first order of business was to set up her Feather Huzzah ESP8266 module. [Becky] started with a blink test to ensure it was working properly. Once that was out of the way, she moved on to installing a few libraries. Temperature data fetched by an IFTTT feed is displayed on a seven-segment display, while additional feeds separately retrieve information for each basic weather type: sunny, overcast, rain, snow.

All it took to create the sleek display effect was a few pieces of cardboard inside a shadow box frame, a sheet of paper as a diffuser, and twelve Neopixel RGB LEDs hidden inside. Trimming and securing everything in place as well as notching out the back of the frame for the power cable finished the assembly. Check out the build video after the break.

Pair this weather frame with a shoe rack that spotlights the appropriate footwear depending on the weather to really streamline your exit.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, misc hacks
Aquesta és la pàgina amb les instruccions d'instal·lació, pas a pas, de l'estació meteorològica:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/learning/weather-station-guide/


1. Muntatge
2. Instal·lació del programari
3. Instal·lació a l'exterior
Aquesta és la pàgina amb les instruccions d'instal·lació, pas a pas, de l'estació meteorològica:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/learning/weather-station-guide/


1. Muntatge
2. Instal·lació del programari
3. Instal·lació a l'exterior

AWS_1An easy to set up and program digital weather station you can build for around $50

Read more on MAKE

The post Build Your Own Arduino Weather Station appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

IMG_6322 (Large)Riffing off of the word clock idea, this Maker created a backlit display for the local weather forecast.

Read more on MAKE

The post This Backlit Display is Like a Word Clock for Weather appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

[Yveaux] had a problem. The transmitter on his outdoor weather station had broken, rendering the inside display useless. He didn’t want to buy a new one, so, like the freelance embedded software designer that he is, he decided to reverse engineer the protocol that the transmitter uses and build his own. He didn’t just replace the transmitter module, though, he decided to create an entire system that integrated the weather system into a sensor network controlled by a Raspberry Pi. That’s a far more substantial project, but it gave him the ability to customize the display and add more features, such as synching the timer in the display with a network clock and storing the data in an online database.

Fortunately for [Yveaux], the transmitter itself was fairly easy to replace. The weather station he had, like most, transmitted on the 868MHz frequency, which is a license-free ISM (Industrial, Scientific and Monitoring) spot on the spectrum. After some poking around, he was able to figure out the protocol and teach the Pi to speak it. He then added a Moteino and an nRF2401+ transmitter to the weather station, so it can send data to the Pi, which then sends it to the display. It is a more complicated setup, but it is also much more flexible. He’s had it running for a couple of years now and has collected more than a million sensor readings.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, wireless hacks

wetterhaus

The “Enchanted Cottage” is a project by Andy Clark with the aim of upgrading a traditional  german “wetter haus”  with a new mechanism and electronics running on Arduino Yún:

The mechanics were replaced with a servo and 3D printed parts designed to make the movement linear rather than arcing as in the traditional approach. The figures were fitted with magnets so that they could move without any obvious form of propulsion.
The electronics were based on an Arduino Yún, custom prototyping shield and an Infineon RGB LED driver shield. The whole thing is powered by a rechargable LiPo battery and a module from AdaFruit. Because the Arduino was deep in the middle of the house, I used fibre optics to bring the light to the top panel. A sensor was added into the roof so you could simply tap it to get it to update the forecast for you.

The project was build over a period of 16 weeks, the mechanical aspects were completed first and the 3D printing took several goes to get it right. The electronics build was fairly straightforward but fitting everything onto the proto shield was challenging and the high clearance for the Yún was also a challenge. The software was written as I went along with demo programs created to test each part. Getting the Yún to work on low power was fairly straightforward but getting a secure and validated HTTPS connection took a few attempts. tried to put as much of the processing into the Python script so that the C++ code was just handling the control. All in all a challenging project that pushed the Yún to it’s limits.

Learn more about the project on Andy’s blog.

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Mini weather station

arduino, Humidity, temperature, weather, wireless Commenti disabilitati su Mini weather station 

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by indigod0g @ instructables.com:

In this project, we will be making a mini weather station that measures temperature and humidity and transmits them wirelessly to a ground station, which displays the readings on an LCD display!

It’s a fairly easy project and can be used either on its own or part of something bigger.

Mini weather station – [Link]



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