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Archive for the ‘stepper motors’ Category

[RoboAvatar]’s Chess Robot consists of a gantry-mounted arm that picks up chess pieces and places them in their new location, as directed by the software. The game begins when the human, playing white, makes a move. When a play has been made, the human player presses a button to let the robot to take its turn. You can see it in action in the videos we’ve posted below the break.

Running the robot is an Arduino UNO with a MUX shield as well as a pair of MCP23017 I/O expander chips — a total of 93 pins available! Thanks to all those pins, the Arduino is able to listen to 64 reed switches, one for every square.

The robot detects the human’s move by listening to its reed switches and identifying when there is a change. The gantry consists of X and Y tracks made out of PVC slabs, with half-inch lead screws turned by NEMA-23s and powered by ST-6600 stepper drivers.

Unlike some chess robots that rely on pre-existing software, this one features a custom minimax chess algorithm that [RoboAvatar] coded himself. It consists of Python scripts run on a computer, which interacts with the Arduino via a serial connection. In the second video, he explains how his algorithm works. You can also download the Arduino and Python files from [RoboAvatar]’s GitHub repository.

You’d be surprised how many chess-playing robots we’ve published, like the ChessM8 robot and this voice-controlled chess robot.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Ago
04

New Project: Built a Motion Control Rig for Time-Lapse Photography

arduino, camera, camera rig, Electronics, Photography, photography rig, stepper motors, time-lapse, video Commenti disabilitati su New Project: Built a Motion Control Rig for Time-Lapse Photography 

sunriseIn this project, you'll learn how to use an Arduino microcontroller and a stepper motor to precisely control the panning of a camera during a time lapse.

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The post Built a Motion Control Rig for Time-Lapse Photography appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Lug
21

Giant Fog-Breathing Robotic Crow Shoots Lasers

arduino, Art, Art & Design, crow, Electronics, kinetic, LED, motor, Robot, robotic, Robotics, sculpture, servo, stepper motors Commenti disabilitati su Giant Fog-Breathing Robotic Crow Shoots Lasers 

crow-featureArtist David Cranmer's "Stakcgrox" is a 3.5 meter tall robotic crow with a rotating head and glowing eyes that shoot lasers.

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The post Giant Fog-Breathing Robotic Crow Shoots Lasers appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

For someone who has never used stepper motors, real-time clocks, or built anything from scratch, [Dodgey99] has done a great job of bending them to his will while building his Etch-A-Sketch clock.

He used two 5V stepper motors with ULN2003 drivers. These motors are mounted on the back and rotate the knobs via pulleys. They are kind of slow; it takes about 2 1/2 minutes to draw the time, but the point of the hack is to watch the Etch-A-Sketch. [Dodgey99] is working to replace these steppers with Nema 17 motors which are much faster. [Dodgey99] used an EasyDriver for Arduino to drive them. He’s got an Arduino chip kit in this clock to save on the BOM, but you could use a regular Arduino. He left out the 5V regulator because the EasyDriver has one.

[Dodgey99] has published three sketches for the clock: one to set up the RTC so that the correct time is displayed once the Etch-A-Sketch is finished, some code to test the hardware and sample the look of the digits, and the main code to replace the test code.

The icing on this timekeeping cake is the acrylic base and mounting he’s fashioned. During his mounting trials, he learned a valuable lesson about drilling holes into an Etch-A-Sketch. You can’t shake an Etch-A-Sketch programmatically, so he rotates it with a Nema 17. Check it out after the jump.

If you’re paying attention, you’ll realize we just saw the exact opposite of this project a few hours ago: a CNC tool (laser cutter) controlled by turning Etch-A-Sketch knobs.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, clock hacks
Mar
26

New Project: Hacking a laser cutter using an Arduino

arduino, ArduinoD14, Electronics, PWM, stepper motors Commenti disabilitati su New Project: Hacking a laser cutter using an Arduino 

DSC07610 (Custom)An Arduino pro mini connected to the z axis stepper motor driver gives improved control over the up down motion of the laser bed.

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Gen
01

Stepper Motor Makes Beats

arduino, beat, Electronics, stepper motors Commenti disabilitati su Stepper Motor Makes Beats 

Screen shot 2013-11-25 at 9.52.19 AMMiguel Valenzuela created a series of computer controlled beats by placing a stepper motor on a guitar's pickup.

Read more on MAKE

Nov
06

Dumpster diving nets 100 Arduino-powered motor controllers

arduino, arduino hacks, dumpster diving, Featured, motor controller, stepper motors Commenti disabilitati su Dumpster diving nets 100 Arduino-powered motor controllers 

Never one to pass up the recycle pile at work, [Scott] usually doesn’t find much. A few old hard drives, maybe a ancient laptop every once in a while, but on very rare occasions he finds something actually useful. This latest haul is a gaggle of stepper motor drivers that, with a bit of work, can be reverse engineered and turned into an Arduino.

After prying into one of the plastic-enclosed boards, [Scott] found a LED, a quartet of transistors for powering the motor, and an ATMega168 microcontroller. Interestingly, most of the pins for the 168 were already broken out on the DA15 connector on each controller. The only thing needed was to build a programmer to dump the Arduino bootloader onto these little widgets.

After much trial and error (and building a new programming interface), [Scott] now has 100 Arduinos with a single stepper motor controller built in. He’s already made a toy light cycle rotate on a small stepper (after the break) and blink a LED, but with this many widgets, we’re wondering what crazy contraption [Scott] will come up with.


Filed under: arduino hacks, Featured


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