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Push Button, Receive Bacon” is a popular catchphrase and graffiti tag often spotted next to the graphic instruction on hand dryers. Well, the Hammerspace Workshop team has decided to bring that meme to life with their latest project for the upcoming Maker Faire Kansas City.  In order to raise awareness of the link between bacon and hand health (kidding, of course), they’ve modified the standard bathroom accessory to display wait time and provide its user with a dose of bacon-related pop culture knowledge before dispensing.

A multi-segment display was CNC routed in the shape of bacon and populated with 10mm LEDs. A standard bacon dispenser relay board controls this display. To entertain and inform the user, a variety of bacon themed pop music will be dispensed immediately and continuously until bacon has been provided. An Adafruit audio FX board stores and plays back the .ogg files containing the bacon related wisdom and culture.

The Push Button – Receive Bacon machine has an extended magazine to supply bacon strips on command. For this prototype we have used a Sharper Image CD Power Tower to hold the bacon strips until they can be used to save a hand. The shelves are constructed of plasma cut stainless steel and held in place with 3D-printed clips that mount into the original device as if the bacon shelf was a jewel case. The tabs that are already present in the tower provide a kind of encoder to ensure repeatable precision and smooth delivery of the bacon. The folding flap design allows for tighter clearance between the bacon magazine and the bacon encrispenator.

And finally, the bacon motivator receives the bacon from the encrispenator and uses vibrational motivation to deliver the hot bacon down a custom engineered stainless chute.

The user then receives the bacon from the bacon nozzle in the usual fashion. After applying the bacon to both palms, the bacon may be eaten to replace lost electrolytes.

You can read more about the project on Make:, and see it in acton below.

emw

Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi and Maker Media’s Dale Dougherty will be in Brussels next week to help kick off European Maker Week at the Opening Conference. During their keynote, they will address European citizens in hopes of inspiring Makers to build projects throughout the weeklong celebration taking place all over the continent. Those wishing to learn more can do so by checking out the agenda and booking their free ticket for Monday, May 30th at the European Committee of the Regions.

massimo dale

European Maker Week is the first initiative promoted by European Commission and implemented by Maker Faire Rome, in collaboration with Startup Europe, to raise awareness around the significance of the Maker culture and its ecosystem, as well as foster creativity and innovation in schools.

Europe is not only home to the highest number of fab labs, Makerspaces, and hackerspaces in the world, it’s also the birthplace of disruptive projects like Arduino, Raspberry Pi,  micro:bit, and RepRap. Every year, there are over 50 Maker Faires, Mini Maker Faires, and the flagship Maker Faire Rome, which drew attention from 100,000-plus visitors in 2015.

European Maker Week, which will be held May 30th to June 5th, will play host to more than 450 events across 28 countries. Click on the map below to find the the event nearest you:

EMWMap

Feb
10

Making is Best When it’s Done Together

around the world, community, Interaction Design, Ivrea, MAKE Magazine, Maker Faire, MakerFaire Commenti disabilitati su Making is Best When it’s Done Together 

makingtogether_massimo

(originally posted on Makezine)

 

This month I’d like to talk about the idea of making together and what it means for Arduino. The whole idea of being a maker involves concepts of collaboration, community, and working with other people. It’s very hard to be a maker and be by yourself locked in a room or even in a lab. It’s really something that involves a lot of collaborations at different levels.

Many people today know what Arduino is, but very few know about two projects I did before Arduino. They were my first attempts to solve the problems my students had in prototyping with electronics. I consider them “creative failures.” As makers, we welcome failure as a way to understand how to do it better the next time.

Those initial projects I prototyped were not working so well because the technology was not really good but mostly because when I developed these things I did them by myself. I didn’t involve other people and I was very inefficient in trying to get them to work properly. They solved a number of problems my students had, but they didn’t really get a lot of momentum.

Ten years ago I started teaching at Interaction Design Institute in Ivrea (unfortunately it doesn’t exist anymore) where the Olivetti company used to be. In the picture below you can see their building and it’s not hard to notice it was created with a “design” approach. Olivetti was one of the first companies in the world to really apply design to everything: from their typewriters, to their buildings and to their posters, etc. Mr. Olivetti had that idea factories should have paintings on the walls because workers should be surrounded by beauty and knowledge. It was part of a bigger approach putting people at the center. It was in this context at the institute where we developed a number of projects before we came out with Arduino in the shape you know it now.

makingtogether_ivrea

If you peel back the surface, underneath Arduino project you can find a lot of collaboration. On one side you can see a selection of pretty amazing open source software contributing to what Arduino has become. I’m talking about GCC, processing, wiring, AVR, and all the other contributions from the community. On the other side, I started to involve specific people.

I met David Cuartielles when he was researching in Ivrea and we started to talk about things we wanted to see in the platform to help our students getting started with electronics. Slowly we also got in touch with other people: Tom Igoe, a professor at ITP in New York with great experience; David Mellis, an amazing software developer who joined Ivrea from MIT; and Gianluca Martino, an electronics engineer who knows every company involved in electronics in the area. He’s now taking care of the manufacturing.

I gathered all these people one-by-one because we wanted to make an open project based on collaboration. All the founders brought their own experience into Arduino and later what became really important was the Arduino community. At the moment there is a community much larger than number of official Arduino boards we have sold. There are more than 180,000 people subscribed to the forum and more than 4 million monthly page views to the website with visitors spending about five minutes on each visit.

Arduino was born out of different contributions and it taught us to follow this path with most of our products. We started collaborating with other people and companies of the open source community, extending our role as makers into ideas and projects becoming products. Recently, we told you the story of the Arduino robot and an example of collaboration.

For example, some years ago, with Adafruit we developed the Arduino Micro packing all of the power of the Arduino Leonardo in a smaller board. We met with Limor and Phil sharing a lot of ideas and more projects are coming up in the next months.

At some point we also worked with Telefonica, a global mobile operator, to make the Arduino Gsm Shield. The technology of the shield is basic but we worked really hard to develop the API to use the module very easily. What’s important about these collaborations is not the technology but other things like lowering the barriers to access a sim card and allowing people to activate it very simply, just with a credit card. The value we created was about opening up a collaboration and making a big company like Telefonica aware of the impact of a product like this in the maker community.

A similar thing, but with a smaller company, happened for Arduino Yún. DogHunter, based in Taiwan, designed the board together with us. The factory we usually work with in Europe didn’t have the experience to work with wi-fi technology so we teamed up with a factory in Taiwan which had an experience with millions of access points. Arduino Yún became the first official board made in Asia.

In the first half of 2014 we are going to release the Arduino TRE. It’s a combination of a Beaglebone and an Arduino plus a number of things designed to make it very convenient for people to get started. We worked with Texas Instruments and especially Beagleboard, which shares with us a series of commitments to open source hardware and similar goals and ideas, like the desire for simplicity and ease of use.

Once again we realized how easier it is to find someone who can give you a cheaper piece of hardware, but in the long run, even if it’s harder to find someone who shares the same set of values, it’s well worth it.

We believe in the open source movement and everyone should be really aware that it can develop successfully if everyone takes from it, but especially if people and companies contribute back. That’s why it’s important to highlight who creates a positive loop and nurture knowledge sharing and collaboration.

makingtogether_mfrome

Even if there is the perception the maker movement is much more U.S.-centric, with a lot of visibility for American makers, events, and companies, we believed that we could do something to improve the relations among the movement here in Europe and activate more positive loops.

We realized that one of the issues was about language. Many European makers are very active in their local community, but they don’t Speak English. That’s why we decided to invest time and resources to create an European Maker Faire in Rome, inviting people from all over the continent. It was not easy to organize it, but I can say that it was an incredible success with more than 35,000 participants. It proved that in Europe people want to get together, know each other and cross the boundaries of the over 27 countries with different languages.

Maker Faire is not an event that has to do strictly with people making hardware. For me it’s much more important because it opens up channels of communication between makers and the concept of making together. We are happy to show what makers can do and how they could collaborate toward a future of great open source projects and, later, bringing benefit to communities around the world.

Nov
02

Evolution of Arduino: the family tree

arduino, history of electronics, infographics, MAKE Magazine, press Commenti disabilitati su Evolution of Arduino: the family tree 

Evolution of Arduino

MAKE Magazine has just released Volume 36 focused on exploring the world of boards and including a detailed photo illustration of the evolution of Arduino.

You can have a preview of the digital magazine here and download a poster here.

Click on the image below for a hi-res version.

makezine_vol36

 

Set
20

Talking about the “Evolution of Microcontrollers” at the New York Hardware Innovation Workshop

events, Hardware, Innovation, MAKE Magazine, Massimo Banzi, Microcontroller, panel Commenti disabilitati su Talking about the “Evolution of Microcontrollers” at the New York Hardware Innovation Workshop 

Hardware Innovation Workshop 2013

Make Magazine published a short report of the panel taking place at the Hardware Innovation Workshop, yesterday in New York City. Massimo Banzi and Jason Kridner, co-founder of BeagleBoard, were on the stage talking about the evolution of microcontrollers:

Makers love to develop on their favorite microcontrollers. The creators behind two of the most popular took boards the stage at the New York Hardware Innovation Workshop (HIW) in a panel moderated by MAKE’s own Matt Richardson. Although makers might like to argue about which is the best platform, there was plenty of common ground for these two panelists.

Massimo Banzi, Co-Founder of the Arduino Project, began the session with a short discussion on how and why Arduino got started.

“Every time you design a system to do everything, you end up with a system designed to do nothing,” Massimo says. “The challenge is to build a platform that solves a simple problem for a specific group of people: beginners for example.”

Keep reading  the article on Make.

Evolution Of Microcontrollers

Nov
09

Tropism Well: A Tall Drink of Water

arduino, benevolent, british, Design, england, fountain, Made On Earth, MAKE Magazine, uk, water, water fountain Commenti disabilitati su Tropism Well: A Tall Drink of Water 

Instead of cricking your neck to drink from a water fountain, what if the fountain cricked its neck for you? Tropism Well is an interactive sculpture that senses when someone is near and bows to pour water into a glass.


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