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Archive for the ‘Fritzing’ Category

[Allan Schwartz] decided to document his experience using Fritzing to design, fabricate, and test a custom Arduino shield PCB, and his step-by-step documentation makes the workflow very clear. Anyone who is curious or has been looking for an opportunity to get started will find [Allan]’s process useful to follow. The PCB in question has two shift registers, eight LEDs, eight buttons, and fits onto an Arduino; it’s just complex enough to demonstrate useful design features and methods while remaining accessible.

[Allan] starts with a basic breadboard design, draws a schematic, prototypes the circuit, then designs the PCB and orders it online, followed by assembly and testing. [Allan] had previously taught himself to use Eagle and etched his own PCBs via the toner transfer method, but decided to use Fritzing instead this time around and found it helpful and easy to use.

About a year ago we saw Fritzing put through its paces for PCB design, and at the time found that it didn’t impress much from an engineering perspective. Regardless, as a hobbyist [Allan] found real value in using Fritzing for his project from beginning to end; he documented both the process and his observations in order to help others, and that’s wonderful.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, how-to

[Corey Harding] designed his business card as a USB-connectable demonstration of his skill. If potential manager inserts the card in a USB drive, open a text editor, then touches the copper pad on the PCB, [Corey]’s contact info pops up in the text box.

In addition to working as a business card, the PCB also works as a Tiny 85 development board, with a prototyping area for adding sensors and other components, and with additional capabilities broken out: you can add an LED, and there’s also room for a 1K resistor, a reset button, or break out the USB’s 5V for other uses. There’s an AVR ISP breakout for reflashing the chip.

Coolly, [Corey] intended for the card to be an Open Source resource for other people to make their own cards, and he’s providing the Fritzing files for the PCB. Fritzing is a great program for beginning and experienced hardware hackers to lay out quick and dirty circuits, make wiring diagrams, and even export PCB designs for fabrication. You can download [Corey]’s files from his GitHub repository.

For another business card project check out this full color business card we published last month.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

ns1

We’ve been playing with NS1 Nanosynth in the last few weeks, when it first appeared under our radars on the Christmas’ Gift Guides (while going sold out in few days, after Synthopia blessed it with this interesting review).  It’s a hackable and customizable analog synthesizer coupled with an Arduino Micro platform.

Personally, it was one of my first steps into modular synthesizers. Nice sounds, easy approach. Peter Kirn is perfectly picturing this amazing compromise here!

Synths: they’re fun to tweak and play. Modulars: they’re fun to patch. Arduinos: they’re fun to hack. Small things: they’re fun to carry around.

But how to track patches? How to share sounds with friends? I was playing mainly with my son, and managed to print out a paper sketch depicting all the different pinout of the synth. I wasn’t satisfied with that, I needed more!

I started writing Sound Machines, about new patches, more sounds. It turned out I made a Fritzing part out of the Nanonsynth, and we started sharing each other patches. This repository holds them, and this is a short review of the best. Enjoy!

 

Here you can listen to the envelope Generator (ADSR) in action:

 

Want to add your very own sounds? You can either add it to their repository or comment here!

Ago
05

Build an IoT Gauge with Arduino Yún and IFTTT

arduino, Featured, Fritzing, gauge, IFTTT, iot, lasercut, tutorial, uno, Yun Commenti disabilitati su Build an IoT Gauge with Arduino Yún and IFTTT 

gauge

Tomas Amberg shared with us the link to an Instructable he published on how to build a Web-enabled, Arduino-based IoT Gauge with a REST API, and connect it to the IFTTT mash-up platform, via the Yaler.net relay service he founded.

The cool thing about this project is the connection with the Maker Channel  of IFTTT which supports custom Webhooks, to integrate DIY IoT projects: 

Inspired by WhereDial, a DIY Internet of Things classic, the IoT Gauge shows the current location of its owner. A bit like the Weasley Clock in Harry Potter. The design and code of the IoT Gauge is generic and could be used as well to display e.g. weather conditions. The logic resides in the Cloud, the gauge is just a servo with an API.

Check out the five-step tutorial and the ingredients you need at this link.

gauge-servo

Set
26

A “Draw it yourself” midi controller with a 3d-printed case

3D printing, arduino, conductive ink, Featured, Fritzing, Midi, music Commenti disabilitati su A “Draw it yourself” midi controller with a 3d-printed case 

dani-draw01

‘Draw It Yourself’ is a MIDI controller created by Dani Sanz which uses conductive ink as push-buttons. It is based on Arduino Uno and uses a capacitive sensor to determine whether the drawn buttons are being touched or not:

This was my second semester project for the Interactive Music Systems Design Course (CDSIM) at the Music Technology Group (MTG) at University Pompeu Fabra of Barcelona. I presented this project at Sonar+D, part of the Sonar festival of Barcelona, held between June 12th and 14th 2014.

dani-draw02

It can be used for multiple applications, not only for music! You can download the Fritzing  and make it yourself on the Instructable and see it in action with this video:

 

Lug
28

Fritzing is out with a new release including Arduino Yún microcontroller!

circuit, education, Featured, Fritzing, new release, pcb, Software Commenti disabilitati su Fritzing is out with a new release including Arduino Yún microcontroller! 

Fritzing is an open-source hardware initiative that makes electronics accessible as a creative material for anyone. You can easily learn how to build a circuit for you project and also design your own PCB.

Last week, the Fritzing team announced the new release with a number of new parts, especially a number of popular microcontrollers, among which also Arduino Yún:

We have upgraded to their latest version Qt5, which brings stability and speed improvements (especially for Mac OS X users). This also enables us to port fritzing to Android, iOS, etc.

You can download Fritzing 0.9.0b at this link.

 

Dic
10

Concrete Batch Plant using Arduino and LIFA in Bangladesh

arduino, community, concrete, Fritzing, Hacks, open source, plant Commenti disabilitati su Concrete Batch Plant using Arduino and LIFA in Bangladesh 

concrete plant

Arduino user Geotechbd wrote us from Bangladesh to share his experience:

Our company here in Bangladesh owns a quite old concrete batch plant, which had full manual control requiring an operator to control 14+ switched and observe 3 mechanical scales (dial gauges). I was successful to upgrade this plant to an automated unit requiring minimal operator input using custom made Arduino Uno compatible board and LIFA. Wiring is still messy which I shall take care in the near future.

concrete plant

On his blog he then details a list of tools, components, and at the end of the post, thanks all the people and communities who supported him in this challenge:

My gratitude goes to my lovely wife for keeping me sane and my brother for arranging for ICs not available locally. My sincerest thanks goes to the Arduino community for helping me to remedy EMI problem and LIFA community for I2C communication troubleshooting. I must thank the developers of Arduino/LIFA/Fritzing for making electronics more accessible to the general masses.

My electronics and Arduino knowledge was gathered from websites as tronixstuff.com / jeremyblum.com / arduino.cc, so thanks to excellent contributors of these sites. I had support personnel (a very patient electrician and a plant operator) here who helped me with wiring high voltage lines, and plant operational knowledge; thus, they also deserve thanks.

It’s cool to see how open source creates collaborations among people all over the world!

Set
11

123D Circuits: Autodesk’s free design tool

arduino, arduino hacks, autodesk, Circuits, circuits.io, Fritzing Commenti disabilitati su 123D Circuits: Autodesk’s free design tool 

123dcircuits

Arduino fanatics rejoice: Autodesk and Circuits.io have jointly released a new electronics design tool with some unique features: 123D Circuits. Anyone familiar with Autodesk knows they have a bit of a habit of taking over the world, but you can relax knowing this is a (pretty much) free product that’s filed under their Free 3D tools—though we’re not quite sure what is “3D” about a circuits layout program.

123D is web-based software, and using it requires account creation on the circuits.io website. Anything you design sits on the cloud: you can collaborate with others and even embed your circuit (with functioning simulation) straight into a webpage. Unfortunately, your work is public and therefore accessible by anyone unless you fork over $12 or $25 monthly: the former only gives you 5 private circuits. Dollar signs pop up again when you hit “finish circuit;” they offer to sell you PCBs in multiples of three.

Some features of the free account, however, may tempt the Arduino veteran away from a go-to program like Fritzing. Plopping in a virtual Arduino lets you edit its code on the fly in another window, which you can then simulate. If you’re new to circuit design or want some guidance for using 123D Circuits, they have provided an extensive list of applicable Instructables. Check out their promotional video below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Mag
08

People over megahertz with Massimo Banzi at Codemotion – Get the promocode

berlin, codemotion, conference, events, Fritzing, MakerFaire, Wearables Commenti disabilitati su People over megahertz with Massimo Banzi at Codemotion – Get the promocode 

codemotion conference

 

As Fritzing guys pointed recently out on their blog

Codemotion is not just another tech conference where developers and engineers attend to compare tools and argue about what’s best and what’s cool. It is a meeting point for many disciplines, hardware meets software and design in a unique and powerful combination.

We’ll be participating to the event, not only with a workshop on wearables (sorry it’s sold out!), but also with

  • People over megahertz - a keynote speech by Massimo Banzi opening the conference on friday the 10th, thanx to MakerFaire Rome
  • Makers movement and fashion are getting closer than we think - a panel on saturday the 11th with Sam Muirhead (OneYearOpensource), Hannah Perner-Wilson (Plusea), Mika Satomi (Kobakant) and Zoe Romano  exploring  how the use of low-cost devices and machines is multiplying possibilities of participation and is transforming the way we approach our garments.

We invite you to join us with a special 50% discount code available only today! You just need to enter this promocode: love_arduino .

 

Nov
27

[Timothy Zandelin], a 15 years old Arduino enthusiast has sent us his first Arduino Project, an arcade interface based on Arduino Leonardo.

The cabinet is made of 4mm HDF and were laser cut at “Fabriken” in Malmö. The red arcade sign in the top is produced in 5mm translucent acrylic. All design and construction drawings were made in Illustrator. I used an Arduino Leonardo to connect the joystick, buttons and the LED light.  The game installed, Superstar Chefs, is an old game developed by my dad’s cousins.

On the other hand, Timothy also built his own prototyping board to learn about how to use different inputs and outputs.

My prototype board was made with Fritzing.

It includes:

- 6 green 3mm LED’s,

- 11 resistors (6 330 ohm, 4 10K ohm and one 100 ohm),

-1 dip8 socket with an ATtiny45,

- 1 potentiometer,

- 4 pushbutton and header sockets.

I created this prototype board to easily get started with Arduino.

Timothy, welcome on board!



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