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Archive for the ‘Arcade’ Category

As if you already weren’t agonizing over whether or not you should build your own arcade cabinet, add this one to the list of compelling reasons why you should dedicate an unreasonable amount of physical space to playing games you’ve probably already got emulated on your phone. [Rodrigo] writes in to show off his project to add some flair to the lighted buttons on his arcade controller. (Google Translate)

The wiring for this project is about as easy as you’d expect: the buttons connect to the digital inputs on the Arduino, and the LEDs on the digital outputs. When the Arduino code sees the button getting pressed, it brings the corresponding LED pin high and starts a fade out timer using the SoftPWM library by [Brett Hagman].

It’s worth noting that the actual USB interface is being done with a stand-alone controller, so the Arduino here is being used purely to drive the lighting effects. The more critical reader might argue that you could do both with a single microcontroller, but [Rodrigo] was in a classic “Use what you’ve got” situation, and already had a USB controller on hand.

Of course, fancy lit arcade buttons won’t do you much good without something to put them in. Luckily we’ve covered some fantastic looking arcade cabinets to get you inspired.

Musicians have an array of electronic tools at their disposal to help make music these days. Some of these are instruments in and of themselves, and [Wai Lun] — inspired by the likes of Choke and Shawn Wasabi — built himself a midi fighter

Midi fighters are programmable instruments where each button can be either a note, sound byte, effect, or anything else which can be triggered by a button. [Lun]’s is controlled by an ATmega32u4 running Arduino libraries — flashed to be recognized as a Leonardo — and is compatible with a number of music production programs. He opted for anodized aluminum PCBs to eliminate flex when plugging away and give the device a more refined look. Check it out in action after the break!

[Lun] designed the project in Fusion 360 and KiCad with plenty of room to spare for some electronic art — gotta love Daft Punk. He’s using Sanwa OBSC 24mm arcade buttons for their premium quality and two SK6812 mini LEDs apiece for a slick lighting effect when they’re pressed.

After receiving the manufactured boards and parts, a quick test fit flowed right into final assembly. With the ATmega32u4 flashed and programmed, he was ready to rock. Down the line, [Lun] wants to have a GUI to configure the notes each button plays without tinkering around in the code, but it works great for now.

For an astounding acoustic to electronic instrument conversion, check out this MIDI accordion!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, musical hacks

[Ryan Bates] apparently really likes building claw machines. We noticed his latest build with a new PCB, but then we scrolled down and found other incarnations of the machine going back to 2015.

The laser-cut claw is interesting looking and the brains are an Arduino. You can see the action in the video below and there are plenty of older videos on the project page.

Without the PCB, the machine was a mess of wires. With the PCB, a single ribbon cable connects the Arduino to the board, and the board has a layout of screw terminals. This results in a much cleaner layout than before.

You might think you wouldn’t see many homemade claw machines. However, that’s not true. We’ve seen plenty, some of them even using commercial claws. Naturally, some of them also connect to the Internet.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

[Ryan Bates] loves arcade games, any arcade games. Which is why you can find claw machines, coin pushers, video games, and more on his website.

We’ve covered his work before with his Venduino project. We also really enjoyed his 3D printed arcade joystick based off the design of a commercial variant. His coin pushing machine could help some us finally live our dream of getting a big win out of the most insidious gambling machine at arcades meant for children.

Speaking of frustrating gambling machines for children, he also built his own claw machine. Nothing like enabling test mode and winning a fluffy teddy bear or an Arduino!

It’s quite a large site and there’s good content hidden in nooks and crannys, so explore. He also sells kits, but it’s well balanced against a lot of open source files if you’d like to do it yourself. If you’re wondering how he gets it all done, his energy drink review might provide a clue.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, misc hacks, Raspberry Pi

Making retro video games on today’s micro controllers brings many challenges, especially when using only the micro controller itself to handle the entire experience. Complex graphics, sound, game logic and input is taxing enough on the small chips, toss in NTSC color graphics and you have a whole different bear on your hands.

[rossum] set out making the Arduinocade retro game system using an overclocked Arduino Uno, and not much more. Supporting 4 voice sound and IR game controllers, the system also boasts 27 simultaneous colors all in software. These colors and the resolution feel like they’re impossible without a graphics chip to offload some of the work. While doing all of this the ATmega328p is also playing some faithful reproductions of classic arcade games.

The uses a couple of interesting tricks. Color is generated with NTSC color artifacts, where the screen is really black and white, but thanks to a delay or two in the signal generation the bits are out of phase from the reference “color burst” signal and appear on-screen as unique colors. This approach was used in the 8 bit Apple II personal computers to generate its colors, and also on the early IBM PC’s with CGA cards to drastically increase color depth. In this case, the chip is overclocked with a 28.6363 MHz crystal (a multiple of NTSC timing) and the SPI hardware leveraged to shift out all the necessary pixels. Check out how great it looks and sounds after the break.

It’s good to see an old trick on a new project and we are off to play some games!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, video hacks
Mar
06

What’s up with the Bluetooth Arcade Controller?

adafruit, Arcade, bluetooth Commenti disabilitati su What’s up with the Bluetooth Arcade Controller? 

Once in a while we’ll get an email along the lines of, “Hey! What happened to the Bluetooth Arcade Controller? I couldn’t find it on your website or your store.” After answering a few of these recently, we decided to make a blog post about it here.

The Bluetooth Arcade Controller (BTAC) was the core component of a neat little project called “Coffee Table MAME Console” in Make Magazine vol 28, that let you build your own arcade-style control panel, and connect it to your computer or Raspberry Pi using a wireless Bluetooth connection.

The world of hobbyist-grade embedded bluetooth keyboard interfaces has advanced greatly in the past couple years since we created the BTAC kit, and it’s no-longer the best solution, in our opinion. We’d suggest trying Adafruit’s new Bluefruit EZ-Key product, which is better in every way (except for number of button inputs) than the BTAC. Plus it’s only $19.95.

bluefruit_ez_key_adafruit

They even have some great tutorial documentation on how to get started with it.

If you need more than 12 inputs, you can connect the Bluefruit module to an Arduino Mega or other microcontroller and use the RX/TX connections to send ASCII characters to the bluetooth module, which will then transmit that character as a keypress to the computer. You can even do raw USB HID keyboard or mouse reports to properly handle up to six concurrent keypresses.

Also, you can re-map the default 12 inputs using an FTDI cable and a processing sketch.

At the end of the day, we suggest going with the Bluefruit EZ-Key, as it’s cheaper, more flexible, and all-around better than our Bluetooth Arcade Controller was.

Nov
28

Turning A Storefront Into A Video Game

Arcade, arduino due, arduino hacks, neopixel Commenti disabilitati su Turning A Storefront Into A Video Game 

invasion

[Kris]‘ house/office has a huge store window, and instead of covering it up with newspapers, decided to do something cool. He’s had projections and other art pieces on display for his neighbors, but his new storefront arcade game very likely beats all of those.

Every video game needs a display, and this one is no slouch. The display is a 16*90 matrix of WS2812 LEDs with inset into a laser cut grid and put behind a layer of plexiglass. With this grid, the display has a great raster effect that’s great for the pixeley aesthetic [Kris] was going for. In front of the window is an MDF and steel arcade box powered by an Arduino Due.

The game is driven by the Adafruit neopixel library, with a few modifications to support alpha blending. There’s no external memory for this game – everything is running on a second Arduino Due inside the window.

It’s a great looking game, and if you’re ever in [Kris]‘ area – behind the zoo in Antwerp – you’re free to walk up and give this game a spin.

Video demo below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Dic
12

Arduino BlueTooth Controller

Arcade, arduino, bluetooth, controller, gallery, game Commenti disabilitati su Arduino BlueTooth Controller 


Ok this is not a project 100% core Arduino, because it uses custom hardware and only the bootloader of Arduino. But Arduino follows the Open-Hardware philosophy, so we are honoured to share this project that use a bit of Arduino. [chris] , from silverball software, sent us his way to build a game controller , programmed with Arduino software.

Well after a few months of tinkering and several designs I finally have one.
The design is based around the Atmega 328 running the Arduino bootloader. There is a RN42-HID bluetooth module that allows serial communication between it and the microprocessor.

I wanted the device to be fully hackable so I designed it with headers for both the bluetooth module and the Atmega 328 chip. I can reprogram the bluetooth module to run HID keyboard or mouse (or combined), it can iterate as a gamepad, or it can reconfigured to run serial protocol and iterate as a virtual com port.

On the [website] there is full description with lots of pictures, have a look.

Nov
27

[Timothy Zandelin], a 15 years old Arduino enthusiast has sent us his first Arduino Project, an arcade interface based on Arduino Leonardo.

The cabinet is made of 4mm HDF and were laser cut at “Fabriken” in Malmö. The red arcade sign in the top is produced in 5mm translucent acrylic. All design and construction drawings were made in Illustrator. I used an Arduino Leonardo to connect the joystick, buttons and the LED light.  The game installed, Superstar Chefs, is an old game developed by my dad’s cousins.

On the other hand, Timothy also built his own prototyping board to learn about how to use different inputs and outputs.

My prototype board was made with Fritzing.

It includes:

- 6 green 3mm LED’s,

- 11 resistors (6 330 ohm, 4 10K ohm and one 100 ohm),

-1 dip8 socket with an ATtiny45,

- 1 potentiometer,

- 4 pushbutton and header sockets.

I created this prototype board to easily get started with Arduino.

Timothy, welcome on board!



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