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Archive for the ‘VU meter’ Category

With his beautifully-colored classroom “noise-o-meter,” Mr. Jones knows when things are getting out of hand.

When you were in school (or if you are in school) the teacher likely told the class to be quiet, perhaps repeating him or herself over an over during the day. The teacher, however, likely never really defined what is good and bad. Mr. Jones has finally solved this issue by creating a classroom “noise-o-meter” using an Arduino, an electret microphone, and a programmable LED strip. In order (apparently) too keep the class in line, noise is simply marked as green for “expected,” amber for “louder,” and “red” for too loud which corresponds nicely with more “traditional” VU meters.

I built this a short while ago as an idea to use in a primary classroom setting. Poster displays are often used by primary teachers wanting to control the noise levels in their classrooms but I wanted to add technology to make it dynamic and responsive. The motivation for this came after seeing the Adafruit Digital NeoPixel LED Strip online and realizing its potential as part of a VU meter.

Are you a teacher and want to build one for yourself? You can check out Mr. Jones’ Instructables page or his own website in a different format.

If you’ve been looking for a simple audio Arduino project, you may want to check out this VU meter from YouTuber RZtronix. The Maker built the device using an Uno along with some LEDs, a couple wires, a breadboard, a sound sensor, and a 5V power supply.

Depending on the music you’re listening to, watching a VU meter bounce to the music is always a good time. So why not integrate the VU meter right into the audio source? That’s what [Matikas] did, and it’s pretty fantastic.

He started with a pair of speakers he had and picked up some NeoPixel LED strips. Carefully wrapping the LED strips around the inside circumference of each speaker, the LEDs fit behind the speaker grills, giving it a cool effect when they’re on.

To control the LEDs, he’s using an Arduino Uno (Atmega328p) which measures the audio level in order to modulate the LED output. A bit of software later (shared on GitHub if you’re interested!) and the VU meters were ready for action — check it out!

As far as VU meters go, we can’t forget this awesome giant-water-tube-VU-display-of-madness.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, led hacks, musical hacks
Ago
15

3D Printed Bracelet Illuminates On The Beat

3D printing, arduino, bracelet, General, LED, music, VU meter Commenti disabilitati su 3D Printed Bracelet Illuminates On The Beat 

GEMMA on board!Maker Michael Barretta created an LED bracelet that is responsive to sound by combining the technology of light organs and Adafruit’s GEMMA microcontroller. The result is groovy.

Read more on MAKE

Feb
28

Add some animated bling to your GQ duds

arduino hacks, FLORA, LED, RGB, tie, VU meter, wearable hacks Commenti disabilitati su Add some animated bling to your GQ duds 

geeky-tie-uses-animated-leds

This tie turned VU meter has us asking: Will anyone be able to look you in the eye during a conversation? It uses an integrated microphone and microcontroller to make a single-column display made of RGB LEDs move to ambient sound.

It shouldn’t be hard to guess that this project is another build from [Becky Stern]. She’s been on fire lately, offering up glowing football helmets and a turn-signal backpack. This uses the same family of components as the latter. A Flora board brings an Arduino to the party. It drives sixteen RGB LED pixels which are addressed using a 1-wire protocol. Sound is measured through a microphone and amplifier breakout board.

Since the hardware gets in the way of a full-windsor, the tie used for the project is a breakaway version which uses velcro. But because you need the needle and (conductive) thread to sew on the components it wouldn’t be hard to alter any tie to perform like this.

Don’t miss the high-quality video tutorial which we’ve embedded after the break.


Filed under: arduino hacks, wearable hacks
Nov
30

Color LED matrix VU meter shows how to use FFT with Arduino

arduino hacks, digital audio hacks, fft, Fourier, VU meter Commenti disabilitati su Color LED matrix VU meter shows how to use FFT with Arduino 

If you’ve ever wanted to make your own VU meter but were scared off by the signal process you need to study this tutorial.

Hackaday Alum [Phil Burgess] developed the device using an RGB LED matrix, microphone, and an Arduino. You’ll notice that is doesn’t include an MSGEQ7 chip which we see in most of these types of projects. We have seen a few that use the Fast Fourier Transform to map the audio signal on the display as this one does. But [Phil's] choice of an assembly language Library for ATmega chips makes this really simple to roll into your own projects.

The one drawback to the hardware choices made here is that there are only eight bits of vertical resolution. It takes a little creative interpretation to make this look good, but the use of color mixing really makes a difference. See for yourself in the demo after the break.

[Thanks PT]


Filed under: arduino hacks, digital audio hacks


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