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Taking great pictures means making them more vibrant enhancing saturation and contrast. Ynformatic has published some tips to help you do that by creating a DIY device to control a polarizer using an Arduino Pro Mini, an iPhone, and a screen from an auto-darkening welder’s mask.

A phototransistor located facing the iPhone’s flashlight LED is connected to both an external interrupt pin and an analog pin. Short pulses on the LED cause interrupts in the Arduino code which are used to synchronize the polarizer. Long pulses on the LED cause the Arduino to enter calibration mode. The time interval between syncrhonization pulses is continuously measured and divided into three equal parts. On receiving a synchronization pulse the voltage is set to 0V for one part, to the 45 degree voltage for one part and finally to 5V for one part. Voltage for the polarizer is supplied from an Arduino PWM output pin. To get a reasonably stable output the PWM frequency was increased to 32 kHz and smoothed with a second order RC filter. The liquid crystal display will be damaged by a constant DC voltage so a CMOS switch is used to alternate the polarity. A 2 kHz square wave generated from a free running Arduino timer is used to drive the switching.

An iPhone app written in Swift is responsible for the user interface and image processing.

Explore the schematic in the picture below, while the full source code for the Arduino and iPhone can be downloaded from here.

schematic-1

 

App development is not fun for everyone, and sometimes you just want to control a device from your phone with minimal work. Blynk appears to be a fairly put-together library for not only hooking up any Arduino or esp8266 to a phone through WiFi, but also through the net if desired.

Install the app onto your iPhone or Android device. Install the libraries on your computer. Next, modify your Arduino source to either pass direct control of a pin to Blynk, or connect Blynk to a virtual pin inside your code for more advanced control. If you want to go the easy route, create an account, log into the app, and drag and drop the interface you’d like. If the idea of letting some corporation host your Arduino project sends shivers down your spine, there is also an option to host your own server. (Editorial snark: Yes, it requires a server. That’s the cost of “simplicity”.)

There have been a few times where we’ve wished we could add app control to our projects, but installing all the libraries and learning a new language just to see a button on a screen didn’t seem worth it. This is a great solution. Have any of you had experience using it?


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Cellphone Hacks

1sheeld

Have you ever thought of turning your iPhone and iPad into a platform of more than 40 Arduino shields? Now it’s possible!

The team of 1Sheeld have officially released the new 1Sheeld for iOS and it’s available for pre-orders for $39 instead of it’s original price $55 (shipping on May 2016).

You can  control robots, actuators, display sensors’ data and much more.  Take a look at the demo video:

The Reality Editor (Credit: Fluid Interface Group/MIT)Augmented reality has yet to find a foothold in widespread applications, but MIT has just released an AR app that allows you to control IoT devices.

Read more on MAKE

The post MIT’s Reality Editor Controls IoT Devices via Augmented Reality appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

The Reality Editor (Credit: Fluid Interface Group/MIT)Augmented reality has yet to find a foothold in widespread applications, but MIT has just released an AR app that allows you to control IoT devices.

Read more on MAKE

The post MIT’s Reality Editor Controls IoT Devices via Augmented Reality appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

All photos taken by space150.Use an Apple Watch to automagically open doors at home or at work with a tap on your wrist.

Read more on MAKE

The post Make an Apple Watch Door Unlocker appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

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Control an Arduino with Your Smartphone via Blynk

Android, arduino, Blynk, cloud, Computers & Mobile, Electronics, iot, iPhone, mobile, Raspberry Pi, smartphone Commenti disabilitati su Control an Arduino with Your Smartphone via Blynk 

BlynkRGBBlynk is a new platform that allows you to build interfaces for controlling and monitoring your projects from your iOS and Android device.

Read more on MAKE

The post Control an Arduino with Your Smartphone via Blynk appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

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Arduino Plays Timberman or how to cheat in video games

cheat, Hacks, iPhone, timberman, videogame Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Plays Timberman or how to cheat in video games 

timberman

Playing addictive and repetitive video games is a pleasure for some people but not so engaging for others. Valentin Haun found the solution to reach high score without getting bored: he made an Arduino Uno playing Timberman for him.

You can find the code and the circuit example for this program on Github

Take a look at the older and slower version made for iPhone

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Custom built test rig BrutusHave you seen this impressive video that shows what happens when you drop a steel ball onto a piece of Gorilla Glass 2 (used in the display of many smart phones, including the iPhone) with and without the protection of a clear polymer material called Rhino Shield? Rhino Shield was […]

Read more on MAKE

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Arduino quadcopter iPhone control

arduino, iPhone, Quadcopter, xBee Commenti disabilitati su Arduino quadcopter iPhone control 

Arduino quadcopter iPhone control:

This Arduino Quadcopter by Kyle Fieldus has iPhone Control, similar to the AR Drone you can tilt the phone to control the quadcopter. Touch OSC is being used to design the phone interface, there is also an Android version available. The system chain is a bit complex since the phone is sending the input data to the computer, the computer determines what should be done on the quadcopter and sends these commands to a computer tethered Arduino via USB. The computer tethered Arduino finally sends the commands to the quadcopter mounted Arduino via Xbee. All of the code and instructions will be made available as soon as this University project has been handed in and graded. You can see the first video here that was taken when the Xbee link between the two Arduinos was tested.

Arduino quadcopter iPhone control - [Link]



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