Posts | Comments

Planet Arduino

Archive for the ‘badge’ Category

Mar
19

SXSW Create: Sparkfun Gives Kids Awesome Badges to Hack

arduino hacks, badge, badge hacking, cons, LED matrix, sparkfun, sxsw, sxsw create, wearable hacks Commenti disabilitati su SXSW Create: Sparkfun Gives Kids Awesome Badges to Hack 

By far the most desirable booth for the crowds at SXSW Create was the Sparkfun quadrant. We call it a quadrant because they had a huge footprint approaching 1/4 the tented area, but it was well used. They brought a number of staff down to Austin in order to give away a legit electronic badge project they call BadgerHack.

sxsw-sparkfun-badgerhack-kit-thumbWe love badge hacking. LOVE IT! But South-by isn’t purely a hardware conference so the badges aren’t made of PCBs (for shame). Add to that, free entry to Create scores you a wristband but no badge.

This is the answer to that, a badge giveaway and build-off aimed at kids but cool enough to make me feel only slightly awful for accepting one when I pretty much knew they were going to run out before the final day was done.

The USB stick PCB is, as you guessed it, an Arduino compatible loaded up with an FTDI chip and an ATmega328p which they call the BadgerStick. Accompanying this is a multiplexed 8×7 LED matrix board. Solder the three pin headers and the battery holder leads, connect to the plastic badge using the supplied double-stick tape, and you have a badge that scrolls a message in LEDs.

DSC_0508What an awesome giveaway. I really like it that they didn’t cut corners here. First off, the kids will value the badge much more because they had to actually assemble it rather than just being handed a finished widget. Secondly, there is the USB to serial chip and USB footprint that means they can reprogram it without any extra equipment. And an LED matrix… come on that’s just a gateway drug to learning Wiring. Bravo Sparkfun and Atmel for going this route with your marketing bucks.

The badge activity rounded out with some hardware interfacing. There’s a 3-pin socket that attendees could plug into 4 different stations around the booth. Once done they received a coupon code for Sparkfun that scrolls whenever the badge is booted up. For some at-home fun, the writeup (linked at the top) for the BadgerHack firmware is quite good. It offers advice on changing what is displayed on the badge and outlines how to build a game of Breakout with just a bit of added hardware.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, cons, wearable hacks
Ott
28

SAINTCON Badge (Badge Hacking for Mortals)

arduino hacks, badge, Beginner, cons, crypto, puzzle, saintcon Commenti disabilitati su SAINTCON Badge (Badge Hacking for Mortals) 

saintcon-badge

[Josh] attended his first SAINTCON this weekend before last and had a great time participating in the badge hacking challenge.

The 2014 SAINTCON is only the second time that the conference has been open to the public. They give out conference badges which are just an unpopulated circuit board. This makes a lot of sense if you figure the number of people who actually hack their badges at conferences is fairly low. So he headed off to the hardware hacking village to solder on the components by hand — it’s an Arduino clone.

This is merely the start of the puzzle. We really like that the published badge resources include a crash course on how to read a schematic. The faq also attests that the staff won’t solder it for you and to get your microcontroller you have to trade in your security screw (nice touch). Once up and running you need to pull up the terminal on the chip and solve the puzzles in the firmware’s menu system. This continues with added hardware for each round: an IR receiver, thermistor, EEPROM, great stuff if you’re new to microcontrollers.

[Josh] mentions that this is nothing compared to the DEFCON badge. Badge hacking at DEFCON is **HARD**; and that’s good. It’s in the top-tier of security conferences and people who start the badge-solving journey expect the challenge. But if you’re not ready for that level of puzzle, DEFCON does have other activities like Darknet. That is somewhere in the same ballpark as the SAINTCON badge — much more friendly to those just beginning to developing their crypto and hardware hacking prowess. After all, everyone’s a beginner at some point. If that’s you quit making excuses and dig into something fun like this!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, cons
Ago
15

The Amazing EMF Conference Badge

arduino, badge, conference, EMF, Makerspaces Commenti disabilitati su The Amazing EMF Conference Badge 

TiLDA-MKe-badgeConference badges can be boring, some can be cool and make nice souvenirs, then there are those that might actually be a reason to go to a conference or event in itself. The TiLDA MKe badge from the upcoming EMF 2014 event looks like it will be one of the […]

Read more on MAKE

Dic
13

Open Informant, surveillance in the open

arduino, badge, diy, e-ink, Exhibition, surveillance, Wearables Commenti disabilitati su Open Informant, surveillance in the open 

Superflex

Back from Wearable Futures in London, I’d like to share a project seen at the Futures 10 exhibition during the last day of the event as it opens up some of the complexities of the issue around big data, surveillance and wearables.

Open Informant” by Superflux  attempts to confront the unsettling realties of surveillance in a networked age.  It’s composed by an app, a digital fabricated wearable container of an e-ink badge and it’s powered by Arduino Pro Mini. The Open Informant App scans your data looking for triggered words, containing a selection of those usually searched by state security services, and broadcasts fragments of  texts to the badge via bluetooth:

Using the body as an instrument for protest, the badge becomes a means of rendering our own voice visible in an otherwise faceless technological panopticon. By openly displaying what is currently taken by forceful stealth, we question the intrusive forms of mass surveillance adopted by democratic nations on its own citizenry, and in the process, shift the conversation around wearables from being about you and your body as machine, to the culture of machine intelligence and algorithmic monitoring.

 

Superflex illustration

The team working on it ( Jon Ardern, Yosuke Ushigome, Anab Jain) shared all aspects of the badge’s design and construction  on Github!

Open informant badge

Lug
29

2013 Open Hardware Summit badge includes ePaper display

arduino hacks, badge, cons, epaper Commenti disabilitati su 2013 Open Hardware Summit badge includes ePaper display 

open-hardware-summit-epaper-badge

Take a look at this sexy piece for open hardware. It’s what you’ll be wearing around your neck at the Open Hardware Summit this year. WyoLum teamed up with Repaper for the display and Seeed Studios for the boards.

It’s called the BADGEr and it’s both an Arduino and and Arduino shield. There are several different power options; coin-cell, microUSB, unpopulated barrel jack, or the lanyard terminals if you want to wear the power supply around your neck. You can see the five momentary push buttons see above, but on the back you’ll find the microSD card slot along with a power switch for preserving the coin cell.

Check out the video below for a quick look. In addition to acting as your credentials the conference schedule comes preloaded. And of course, this is an Open Source design so you can dig through schematic, board artwork, and code at the page linked above. Oh, and the first hack has already been pulled off. Here’s the badge reading Crime and Punishment.

Speaking of conference badges, DEF CON starts this week. Hackaday writer [Eric Evenchick] will be there and we hope he has a chance to look in on some of the badge hacking at the event.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, cons
Dic
10

OLED name badge with rechargeable LiPo cell

arduino hacks, badge, breakout, lipo, OLED Commenti disabilitati su OLED name badge with rechargeable LiPo cell 

oleduino-name-badge

Here’s a project that let [Rick Pannen] try his hand with an OLED display and a rechargeable power source. He calls it OLEDuino which is a mashup of the display type and the Arduino compatible chip running the whole thing. He figures it will serve nicely as a geeky name badge but also ported a Breakout type game to play when he’s bored.

The project is an inexpensive way to attempt a more permanent trinket than simply using Arduino and a breadboard. [Rick] sourced the OLED display and USB LiPo charging cable on eBay. The ATmega328 hiding below the display is being driven from the 3.7V LiPo cell without any power regulation. The four buttons at the bottom provide the only user input but it should be more than enough for a few simple tricks.

Head over to his code repo for a bit more information. The schematic and board are both Eagle files. We generated an image of the schematic and embedded it after the break if you want to take a quick look at how simple the hardware really is.

oleduino


Filed under: arduino hacks


  • Newsletter

    Sign up for the PlanetArduino Newsletter, which delivers the most popular articles via e-mail to your inbox every week. Just fill in the information below and submit.

  • Like Us on Facebook