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If your idea of a six-course meal is a small order of chicken nuggets, you might have missed the rise of sous vide among cooks. The idea is you seal food in a plastic pouch and then cook it in a water bath that is held at a precise temperature. That temperature is much lower than you usually use, so the cook times are long, but the result is food that is evenly cooked and does not lose much moisture during the cooking process. Of course, controlling a temperature is a perfect job for a microcontroller and [Kasperkors] has made his own setup using an Arduino for control. The post is in Danish, but Google translate is frighteningly good.

The attractive setup uses an Arduino Mega, a display, a waterproof temperature probe, and some odds and ends. The translation does fall down a little on the parts list, but if you substitute “ground” for “earth” and “soil” you should be safe. For the true epicurean, form is as important as function, and [Kasperkors’] acrylic box with LEDs within is certainly eye-catching. You can see a video of the device, below.

The switches, LEDs, and relays are all pretty standard fare. The real heart of the project is the temperature control. Many controllers use a PID (proportional/integral/derivative) to hold the temperature, but this project takes a more pragmatic approach. Depending on how far from the set point the temperature is, the controller simply drives the heating element differently and measures more or less frequently to adjust. For example, if the temperature is more than two degrees low, the heating element is left on constantly. As it gets closer, though, the heating element runs for 10 seconds, there’s a 5 second wait, and then the algorithm reads the temperature again.

There’s a lot of debate about how precise the temperature has to be. Apparently, for things like fish, a wide range of temperatures isn’t a problem. Eggs, however, need tighter control because their proteins can denature (whatever that means).

There’s also a safety relay that shuts the whole affair down if the temperature goes very high or low so a bad temperature sensor won’t boil everything away. We might have considered doing that with a bimetallic coil so that even an Arduino failure would not stop it from working.

We’ve seen other attractive sous vide setups. Not to mention the more utilitarian builds made with a crock pot. No matter what it looks like, these projects are probably not going to help your waistline.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

If your idea of a six-course meal is a small order of chicken nuggets, you might have missed the rise of sous vide among cooks. The idea is you seal food in a plastic pouch and then cook it in a water bath that is held at a precise temperature. That temperature is much lower than you usually use, so the cook times are long, but the result is food that is evenly cooked and does not lose much moisture during the cooking process. Of course, controlling a temperature is a perfect job for a microcontroller and [Kasperkors] has made his own setup using an Arduino for control. The post is in Danish, but Google translate is frighteningly good.

The attractive setup uses an Arduino Mega, a display, a waterproof temperature probe, and some odds and ends. The translation does fall down a little on the parts list, but if you substitute “ground” for “earth” and “soil” you should be safe. For the true epicurean, form is as important as function, and [Kasperkors’] acrylic box with LEDs within is certainly eye-catching. You can see a video of the device, below.

The switches, LEDs, and relays are all pretty standard fare. The real heart of the project is the temperature control. Many controllers use a PID (proportional/integral/derivative) to hold the temperature, but this project takes a more pragmatic approach. Depending on how far from the set point the temperature is, the controller simply drives the heating element differently and measures more or less frequently to adjust. For example, if the temperature is more than two degrees low, the heating element is left on constantly. As it gets closer, though, the heating element runs for 10 seconds, there’s a 5 second wait, and then the algorithm reads the temperature again.

There’s a lot of debate about how precise the temperature has to be. Apparently, for things like fish, a wide range of temperatures isn’t a problem. Eggs, however, need tighter control because their proteins can denature (whatever that means).

There’s also a safety relay that shuts the whole affair down if the temperature goes very high or low so a bad temperature sensor won’t boil everything away. We might have considered doing that with a bimetallic coil so that even an Arduino failure would not stop it from working.

We’ve seen other attractive sous vide setups. Not to mention the more utilitarian builds made with a crock pot. No matter what it looks like, these projects are probably not going to help your waistline.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Using an Arduino Micro for control, French teenager “Joebarteam” came up with a way to biometrically secure his garage.

If you need to get into your locked garage, what could be better than using your fingerprint? To this end, Joe’ came up with a system that unlocks his door using a fingerprint scanner, and a bistable relay to disable communication between the scanner and the Arduino if there’s a problem.

It’s a really professional-looking build, and the locking mechanism is especially interesting. Two rack-and-pinion devices plunge shafts into the ground, making the door impossible to open (it has to pull out before going up). If there is an issue with the system, the pins can be physically unlocked and disabled as needed.

You can find more details on the project’s Instructables page here.

Com funciona: el sensor cnY70 té la mateixa utilitat que el sensor seguilínia l'única diferència que té és la forma en què se conecta a la placa.
Com es connecta a la Placa Arduino: necessitem cables, resistències, placa Arduino i Placa Protoboard. Té 3 connexions principals:
GND.
Font Alimentació.
PING de la placa Arduino.
CODI:
int sensor;
void setup() {
  // initialize the digital pin as an output.
  for(int i=5;  i<11; i++){ 
  pinMode(i, OUTPUT);
  }
  pinMode(3,INPUT);
  Serial.begin(9600); 
  }

// the loop routine runs over and over again forever:
void loop() {

   sensor=digitalRead(3);
   Serial.println(sensor);
   
  // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(0);               // wait for a second
}
Imágenes integradas 1

If you want to build a robot that moves across the ground, the normal options are wheels or legs of some kind. Maker “joesinstructables,” however, decided to do something a bit different. He created a versatile, slithering system, which he calls the “Lake Erie Mamba.”

He put a dozen Arduino Mega-controlled servos together in a reptile configuration to allow the robot to move via serpentine motion (like a normal snake), rectilinear motion (like a worm), or sidewinding (which snakes use in shifting terrain). It can also twist itself into a wheel and roll in this rather unnatural, though quite interesting way.

The Lake Erie Mamba contains 12 segments, each consisting of a servo motor, a C-bracket, a side bracket, a wire clip, and a set of LEGO wheels. The reconfigurable robot is not only controlled using a four-button key fob remote, but can move about autonomously via an IR sensor as well.

You can see more of this build on its Instructables page here and in action below!

If you want to build a robot that moves across the ground, the normal options are wheels or legs of some kind. Maker “joesinstructables,” however, decided to do something a bit different. He created a versatile, slithering system, which he calls the “Lake Erie Mamba.”

He put a dozen Arduino Mega-controlled servos together in a reptile configuration to allow the robot to move via serpentine motion (like a normal snake), rectilinear motion (like a worm), or sidewinding (which snakes use in shifting terrain). It can also twist itself into a wheel and roll in this rather unnatural, though quite interesting way.

The Lake Erie Mamba contains 12 segments, each consisting of a servo motor, a C-bracket, a side bracket, a wire clip, and a set of LEGO wheels. The reconfigurable robot is not only controlled using a four-button key fob remote, but can move about autonomously via an IR sensor as well.

You can see more of this build on its Instructables page here and in action below!

It makes sense considering evolution, but nature comes up with lots of different ways to do things. Consider moving. Land animals walk on four feet or two, some jump, and some use peristalsis or otherwise slither. Oddly, though, mother nature never developed the wheel (although the mother-of-pearl moth’s caterpillar will form its entire body into a hoop and roll away from attackers). Human-developed robots which, on the other hand, most often use wheels. Even a tank track has wheels within. [Joesinstructables] latest robot still uses wheels, but it emulates the slithering motion of a snake, He calls it the Lake Erie Mamba.

The most interesting thing about the robot is that it can reconfigure and move in several different modalities. Like the caterpillar, it can even form a wheel like an ouroboros and roll. You can see that at the end of the video, below.

The base configuration slithers and uses 12 segments, each containing a servo motor. [Joe] uses a key fob remote to drive the snake, although it can move by itself, too. The brains are — what else — an Arduino. In some configurations, the snake carries its own brain and power. In others, there’s a scary-looking wiring harness necessary when the snake becomes a wheel because it has no room in that configuration for the extra items.

Real snakes have different ways they move, and so does the Lake Erie Mamba. In the slithering configuration, passive wheels convert a sine or cosine wave motion into linear motion. [Joe] explains the math behind the motion. If you take off the passive wheels, the snake can move like an inch worm. Turning is complicated in this mode since it can only go forward or backward without some changes. The segments can reconfigure to put a drive wheel in play to introduce the desired lateral motion.

Real snakes can combine the two kinds of motion to “sidewind” and the Mamba can do that too. This does require reconfiguration of the segments and driving some segments with a sine wave and others with a cosine wave.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen the ouroboros trick. If you think robotic snakes couldn’t possibly be useful, think again. Of course the modular robot that captured our hears is Dtto, which claimed the Grand Prize in last year’s Hackaday Prize.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, robots hacks

With October still six months away, you may not be thinking about Halloween decorations just yet. However, this Arduino-based ocular assembly could make for a spooky yet simple prop!

There are few things more unnerving than an eyeball or three looking at you from some concealed position—such as under clothing as in the project’s video. If you’d like to scare friends, family, or random visitors, Maker Will Cogley has the perfect solution with his 3D-printed animatronic eye and eyelid mechanism.

A joystick moves the eyeball around, while a small push-to-make switch blinks the eye and another potentiometer adjusts how wide open the eyelids are by default. The device itself, which can be controlled with any Arduino board capable of supporting four servos, took him a day to design and build, and should take much less time using his instructions, code, and STL files.

Want to create your own? You can find more details over on Cogley’s Instructables page here.

When most people decide they’re going to build a quadcopter, they likely go to their favorite online retailer or hobby shop, and get the correct parts to connect together.

17-year-old Maker Nikodem Bartnik instead decided to customize things further, programming an Arduino to act as his flight controller, and constructing a transmitter (or “pilot” as he refers to it) from scratch. Finally, he attempted to 3D print the frame, but after some difficulty chose to just buy one.

The rest of the electronics consisted of four motors, four ESCs, some propellers, two nRF24L01 radio modules, an MPU-6050, a LiPo battery, and a bunch of other small components. You can see more of Bartnik’s project over on Instructables, as well as check out “Ludwik” (named partially as a nod to Nikodem’s friend “lukmar”) flying quite nicely in the video below.

When most people decide they’re going to build a quadcopter, they likely go to their favorite online retailer or hobby shop, and get the correct parts to connect together.

17-year-old Maker Nikodem Bartnik instead decided to customize things further, programming an Arduino to act as his flight controller, and constructing a transmitter (or “pilot” as he refers to it) from scratch. Finally, he attempted to 3D print the frame, but after some difficulty chose to just buy one.

The rest of the electronics consisted of four motors, four ESCs, some propellers, two nRF24L01 radio modules, an MPU-6050, a LiPo battery, and a bunch of other small components. You can see more of Bartnik’s project over on Instructables, as well as check out “Ludwik” (named partially as a nod to Nikodem’s friend “lukmar”) flying quite nicely in the video below.



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