Posts | Comments

Planet Arduino

Archive for the ‘TFT Display’ Category

We can race against the clock when assembling jigsaw puzzles online but what about competing against each other in the real world? [HomeMadeGarbage] came up with the simplest of solutions with his jigsaw puzzle timer that stops only when the puzzle’s completely assembled.

Copper strip on back of puzzle
Copper strip on back of puzzle

His simple solution was to attach copper foil tape to the back of the pieces, with overlap. He did this in a serpentine pattern to ensure that all pieces had a strip of the tape. The puzzle he used comes with a special container to assemble it in. At two corners of that container, he put two more pieces of copper foil, to which he soldered wires. Those two act as a switch. Only when the puzzle is completed will those two pieces be connected through the serpentine strip on the back of the puzzle.

Next, he needed a timer. The two wires from the puzzle container go to an Arduino UNO which uses an ILI9325 touch panel TFT display for both the start, stop, and reset buttons, and to show the time elapsed. Press the touch screen when it says START and begin assembling the puzzle. When the last piece is inserted, the serpentine strip of copper tape completes the circuit and only then does the Arduino program stop the timer. As you can see from the video below, the result makes doing the puzzle lots of fun.

Naturally, it takes some work to apply the copper tape and you wouldn’t likely do this for puzzles with a thousand pieces but most online puzzles don’t have many pieces either. It’s the fun of the race that matters, and with people taking turns, you want it to be quick anyway.

If you have a printed photo that you want to turn into a puzzle with suitably sized pieces, then you can use this online program that produces an SVG file to tell your laser cutter how to cut out the puzzle. Or maybe you’d prefer to make a robot to make the puzzle for you? In that case, you can start with [thomasgruwez]’s pick and place jigsaw puzzle aid.

Instagram Photo


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Reader [Jasper] writes in with glowing praise for the TFT_eSPI library for the ESP8266 and the various cheap 480×320 TFT displays (ILI9341, ILI9163, ST7735, S6D02A1, etc.) that support SPI mode. It’s a drop-in replacement for the Adafruit GFX and driver libraries, so you don’t need to rework your code to take advantage of it. If you’re looking to drive an LCD screen with an ESP8266 and Arduino, check this out for sure.

As a testbed, [Jasper] ported his Tick Tock Timer project over to the new library. He got a sevenfold increase in draw speed, going from 500 ms to 76 ms. That’s the difference between a refresh that’s visibly slow, and one that looks like it happens instantly. Sweet.

Improving software infrastructure isn’t one of the sexiest or most visible hacks, but it can touch the lives of many hackers. How many projects have we featured with an ESP8266 and a screen? Thanks, [Bodmer] for the good work, and [Jasper] for bringing it to our attention.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Microcontrollers
Giu
02

Optimizing AVR LCD Libraries

arduino hacks, AVR, C, LCD, Microcontroller, microcontrollers, SPI, TFT, TFT Display Commenti disabilitati su Optimizing AVR LCD Libraries 

A while ago, [Paul Stoffregen], the creator of the Teensy family of microcontrollers dug into the most popular Arduino library for driving TFT LCDs. The Teensy isn’t an Arduino – it’s much faster – but [Paul]’s library does everything more efficiently.

Even when using a standard Arduino, there are still speed and efficiency gains to be made when driving a TFT. [Xark] recently released his re-mix of the Adafruit GFX library and LCD drivers. It’s several times faster than the Adafruit library, so just in case you haven’t moved on the Teensy platform yet, this is the way to use one of these repurposed cell phone displays.

After reading about [Paul]’s experience with improving the TFT library for the Teensy, [Xark] grabbed an Arduino, an LCD, and an Open Workbench Logic Sniffer to see where the inefficiencies in the Adafruit library were. These displays are driven via SPI, where the clock signal goes low for every byte shifted out over the data line. With the Adafruit library, there was a lot of wasted time in between each clock signal, and with the right code the performance could be improved dramatically.

The writeup on how [Xark] improved the code for these displays is fantastic, and the results are impressive; he can fill a screen with pixels at about 13FPS, making games that don’t redraw too much of the screen at any one time a real possibility.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Microcontrollers
Dic
20

TFTweet – Displaying Tweets on an Arduino Shield with the Raspberry Pi

AlaMode, arduino, DIY Projects, Raspberry Pi, TFT Display, twitter Commenti disabilitati su TFTweet – Displaying Tweets on an Arduino Shield with the Raspberry Pi 

20121202_031332Drew Fustini recently got his hands on an AlaMode and used it display tweets from his Raspberry Pi to an 2.8" TFT LCD Touchscreen Shield. The AlaMode and shield are connected to the Raspberry Pi which runs the Arduino IDE and a bit of Python code to make it all happen.

Read the full article on MAKE



  • Newsletter

    Sign up for the PlanetArduino Newsletter, which delivers the most popular articles via e-mail to your inbox every week. Just fill in the information below and submit.

  • Like Us on Facebook