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Archive for the ‘RF’ Category

You might think that there could be no form factor that has not as yet had an Arduino fitted in to it. This morning a new one came our way. [Johan Kanflo]’s AAduino is an Arduino clone with an onboard RF module that fits within the form factor of an AA battery. Putting the Arduino inside its own battery pack makes a very neat and compact self-contained unit.

At the heart of the board is an ATmega328 clocked at 8MHz to reduce power consumption and fused to drop out at 1.7V. The radio module is a HopeRF RFM69C which as supplied is a little bit too big for the AA form factor so [Johan] has carefully filed away the edge of the PCB to make it fit. Enough room is left within the shape of an AA cell for a couple of DS18B20 temperature sensors and an indicator LED. He provides a handy buyer’s guide to the different versions of a 3xAA box with a lid, and all the files associated with the project are available in his GitHub repository.

Especially with the onboard radio module we can see that the AADuino board could be a very useful piece of kit. Perhaps for instance it could be used as a very low power self-contained UKHASnet node.

We’ve featured quite a few Arduino clones over the years that try to break the size mould in some way. This stripboard Arduino almost but not quite equals the AAduino’s size, as does this PCB version barely wider than the DIP package of its processor. But the AADuino is a bit different, in that it’s a ready-made form factor for putting out in the field rather than just another breadboard device. And we like that.

Filed under: Arduino Hacks, news

[jmilldrum] really gets a lot of use out of his Si5351A breakout board. He’s a ham [NT7S], and the Si5351A can generate multiple square waves ranging from 8 kHz to 160 MHz, so it only stands to reason that it is going to be a useful tool for any RF hacker. His most recent exploit is to use the I2C-controllable chip to implement a Fast Simple QSO (FSQ) beacon with an Arduino.

FSQ is a relatively new digital mode that uses a form of low rate FSK to send text and images in a way that is robust under difficult RF propagation. There are 32 different tones used for symbols so common characters only require a single tone. No character takes more than two tones.

The Si5351A can easily handle the encoding job. Since the output is a square wave, you do need a low-pass filter to put it on the air. [jmilldrum] also used some relatively small amplifiers to get the output up to 20 watts.

You might remember, we’ve talked about [jmilldrum’s] work with the Si5351A before. We also recently were talking about hams experimenting with digital modes and this is a great example, both by the developers of FSQ and [jmilldrum] for implementing it with an Arduino. If you want to learn more about FSQ, see the video below.

Filed under: Arduino Hacks, radio hacks, wireless hacks

HC-05 Bluetooth link with zero code

arduino, bluetooth, hc-05, RF Commenti disabilitati su HC-05 Bluetooth link with zero code 


Phillipe Cantin writes:

So you want to two HC-05 modules to automatically connect together, as soon as they’re powered up and with zero code? Well this is your lucky day since this can be done using the AT+BIND command.
Let’s do this thing!
For this, you will need:
1 Arduino (I’m using UNO)
2 HC-05 modules
1 breadboard
Arduino IDE (I’m using version 1.0.5-r2)


HC-05 Bluetooth link with zero code - [Link]


Introducing RFToy, an Arduino-compatible gadget for radio frequency modules

arduino, ATmega328, CH340G, OLED, RF, RFToy, USB Commenti disabilitati su Introducing RFToy, an Arduino-compatible gadget for radio frequency modules 


RaysHobby build a project called RFToy:

it’s an Arduino-compatible microcontroller board for interfacing with radio frequency (RF) modules, such as the popular 433/315MHz transmitter/receiver, and the nRF24L01 transceiver. The RFToy has a built-in ATmega328, USB-serial converter (CH340G), 128×64 OLED display, three buttons, and a coin battery holder. Programming is done in Arduino through the on-board mini-USB port. It has three sets of pin headers to directly fit RF modules, and an audio jack to output RF receiver signals to a computer’s sound card. Using RFToy you can build a variety of projects involving RF modules, such as remote control and wireless sensors.


Introducing RFToy, an Arduino-compatible gadget for radio frequency modules - [Link]


DIY 433MHz RF Receiver and 4 x SPDT Relay Shield

arduino, Relay, RF Commenti disabilitati su DIY 433MHz RF Receiver and 4 x SPDT Relay Shield 



You are planning to use Arduino in your project but you need some kind of remote control functionality. A standalone Arduino won’t provide what you need but this DIY shield may be a good solution for you. It includes a 433.92Mhz RF receiver which lets you send commands to Arduino wirelessly and four SPDT relays which can be used for switching purposes.

Each relay is capable of switching up to 10A @ 250VAC so they can be used to control mains powered devices. There are four LEDS indicating the status of the relays. The terminal blocks on the shield lets you easily connect the devices you will control.

The RF receiver is a module that can be found in the market easily. It is directly soldered to the shield and runs at 4800bps. The board has an antenna input which lets you solder your custom antenna to increase the wireless range.

DIY 433MHz RF Receiver and 4 x SPDT Relay Shield - [Link]


DIY RFID card lock system

arduino, door, RF, rfid Commenti disabilitati su DIY RFID card lock system 


Shawn McCombs blogged about his DIY Arduino RFID card door lock system 100 cards build. [via]

DIY RFID card lock system - [Link]


Indoor/outdoor wireless thermometer using Arduino

433MHz, arduino, DS18B20, LCD, RF Commenti disabilitati su Indoor/outdoor wireless thermometer using Arduino 


Instructables user Slomi posted this useful project on how to build a wireless indoor and outdoor thermometer using an Arduino! Via Embedded Lab.

This Arduino-based wireless thermometer uses two Arduino boards to measure indoor and outdoor temperatures. The outdoor Arduino board sends out the outdoor temperature measured by DS18B20 sensor to the indoor Arduino board using inexpensive 433MHz RF transmitter and receiver modules. The indoor Arduino board then displays the indoor and outdoor temperatures on a character LCD display.


Indoor/outdoor wireless thermometer using Arduino - [Link]



Cyber Monday may be behind us, but there are always some hackable, inexpensive electronics to be had. [Stephen's] wireless Android/Arduino outlet hack may be the perfect holiday project on the cheap, especially considering you can once again snag the right remote controlled outlets from Home Depot. This project is similar to other remote control outlet builds we’ve seen here, but for around $6 per outlet: a tough price to beat.

[Stephen] Frankenstein’d an inexpensive RF device from Amazon into his build, hooking the Arduino up to the 4 pins on the transmitter. The first step was to reverse engineer the communication for the outlet, which was accomplished through some down and dirty Arduino logic analyzing. The final circuit included a standard Arduino Ethernet shield, which [Stephen] hooked up to his router and configured to run as a web server. Most of the code was borrowed from the RC-Switch outlet project, but the protocols from that build are based on US standards and did not quite fit [Stephen's] needs, so he turned to a similar Instructables project to work out the finer details.

Stick around after the break for a quick video demonstration, then check out another wireless outlet hack for inspiration.

[Via Reddit]

Filed under: Android Hacks, Arduino Hacks, home hacks

Reflow toaster oven using an Arduino

arduino, Oven, Reflow, RF, servo, transmitter Commenti disabilitati su Reflow toaster oven using an Arduino 

Ray Wang writes:

Hi, I recently built a reflow toaster oven using an Arduino. I know it’s pretty standard stuff, but my version has an automatic oven door opener (using a servo) and circulation fan to speed up the cooling time, and remote notification using an RF transmitter


Reflow toaster oven using an Arduino - [Link]


Mailbox notifier texts when the letter carrier arrives

arduino hacks, lifehacks, Mailbox, moteino, notifier, RF Commenti disabilitati su Mailbox notifier texts when the letter carrier arrives 


[Felix Rusu's] mailbox is on the other side of the street and he’s got a pretty big front yard. This means checking for mail is not just a pop your head out of the door type of activity. This becomes especially noticeable during the winter months when he has to bundle up and trudge through the snow to see if his letter carrier has been there yet. But he’s made pointless trips a thing of the past by building a notifier that monitors the mailbox for him.

He’s using a Moteino, which is an Arduino clone of his own making. It’s tiny and features an RF module on the underside of the board which takes care of communicating with a base station inside the house. The module seen above rolls the microcontroller board up along with a 9V battery and a hall effect sensor which can tell if the mailbox door is open or closed. When the Arduino detects a change to that sensor it pushes some data back to the base station which then relays the info to a computer or Raspberry Pi in order to send him a text message. All of this is shown off in the video after the break.

Filed under: Arduino Hacks, lifehacks

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