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Archive for the ‘LCD’ Category

The purpose of this guide is to get your 0.96″ color LCD display successfully operating with your Arduino, so you can move forward and experiment and explore further types of operation with the display. This includes installing the Arduino library, making a succesful board connection and running a demonstration sketch.

Although you can use the display with an Arduino Uno or other boad with an ATmega328-series microcontroller – this isn’t recommended for especially large projects. The library eats up a fair amount of flash memory – around 60% in most cases.

So if you’re running larger projects we recommend using an Arduino Mega or Due-compatible board due to the increased amount of flash memory in their host microcontrollers.

Installing the Arduino library

So let’s get started. We’ll first install the Arduino library then move on to hardware connection and then operating the display.

(As the display uses the ST7735S controller IC, you may be tempted to use the default TFT library included with the Arduino IDE – however it isn’t that reliable. Instead, please follow the instructions below). 

First – download the special Arduino library for your display and save it into your Downloads or a temp folder.

Next – open the Arduino IDE and select the Sketch > Include Library > Add .ZIP library option as shown below:

libraryinstall

A dialog box will open – navigate to and select the zip file you downloaded earlier. After a moment or two the IDE will then install the library.

Please check that the library has been installed – to do this, select the Sketch > Include Library option in the IDE and scroll down the long menu until you see “ER-TFTM0.96-1” as shown below:

libraryinstalled

Once that has been successful, you can wire up your display.

Connecting the display to your Arduino

The display uses the SPI data bus for communication, and is a 3.3V board. You can use it with an Arduino or other 5V board as the logic is tolerant of higher voltages.

Arduino to Display

GND ----- GND (GND)
3.3V ---- Vcc (3.3V power supply)
D13 ----- SCL (SPI bus clock)
D11 ----- SDA (SPI bus data out from Arduino)
D10 ----- CS (SPI bus "Chip Select")
D9 ------ DC (Data instruction select pin)
D8 ------ RES (reset input)

If your Arduino has different pinouts than the Uno, locate the SPI pins for your board and modify as appropriate.

Demonstration sketch

Open a new sketch in the IDE, then copy and paste the following sketch into the IDE:

// https://pmdway.com/products/0-96-80-x-160-full-color-lcd-module
#include <UTFT.h>

// Declare which fonts we will be using
extern uint8_t SmallFont[];

// Initialize display
// Library only supports software SPI at this time
//NOTE: support  DUE , MEGA , UNO 
//SDI=11  SCL=13  /CS =10  /RST=8  D/C=9
UTFT myGLCD(ST7735S_4L_80160,11,13,10,8,9);    //LCD:  4Line  serial interface      SDI  SCL  /CS  /RST  D/C    NOTE:Only support  DUE   MEGA  UNO

// Declare which fonts we will be using
extern uint8_t BigFont[];

int color = 0;
word colorlist[] = {VGA_WHITE, VGA_BLACK, VGA_RED, VGA_BLUE, VGA_GREEN, VGA_FUCHSIA, VGA_YELLOW, VGA_AQUA};
int  bsize = 4;

void drawColorMarkerAndBrushSize(int col)
{
  myGLCD.setColor(VGA_BLACK);
  myGLCD.fillRect(25, 0, 31, 239);
  myGLCD.fillRect(myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-31, 161, myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-1, 191);
  myGLCD.setColor(VGA_WHITE);
  myGLCD.drawPixel(25, (col*30)+15);
  for (int i=1; i<7; i++)
    myGLCD.drawLine(25+i, ((col*30)+15)-i, 25+i, ((col*30)+15)+i);
  
  if (color==1)
    myGLCD.setColor(VGA_WHITE);
  else
    myGLCD.setColor(colorlist[col]);
  if (bsize==1)
    myGLCD.drawPixel(myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-15, 177);
  else
    myGLCD.fillCircle(myGLCD.getDisplayXSize()-15, 177, bsize);
    
  myGLCD.setColor(colorlist[col]);
}
void setup()
{
  randomSeed(analogRead(0));
  
// Setup the LCD
  myGLCD.InitLCD();
  myGLCD.setFont(SmallFont);
}

void loop()
{
  int buf[158];
  int x, x2;
  int y, y2;
  int r;

// Clear the screen and draw the frame
  myGLCD.clrScr();

  myGLCD.setColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 0, 159, 13);
  myGLCD.setColor(64, 64, 64);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 114, 159, 127);
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 255, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.print("pmdway.com.", CENTER, 1);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(64, 64, 64);
  myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
  myGLCD.print("pmdway.com", LEFT, 114);


  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.drawRect(0, 13, 159, 113);

// Draw crosshairs
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(0, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.drawLine(79, 14, 79, 113);
  myGLCD.drawLine(1, 63, 158, 63);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);
 
  for (int i=9; i<150; i+=10)
    myGLCD.drawLine(i, 61, i, 65);
  for (int i=19; i<110; i+=10)
    myGLCD.drawLine(77, i, 81, i);
    

// Draw sin-, cos- and tan-lines  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,255,255);
  myGLCD.print("Sin", 5, 15);
  for (int i=1; i<158; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.drawPixel(i,63+(sin(((i*2.27)*3.14)/180)*40));
  }
  
  myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
  myGLCD.print("Cos", 5, 27);
  for (int i=1; i<158; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.drawPixel(i,63+(cos(((i*2.27)*3.14)/180)*40));
  }

  myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
  myGLCD.print("Tan", 5, 39);
  for (int i=1; i<158; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.drawPixel(i,63+(tan(((i*2.27)*3.14)/180)));
  }

  delay(2000);

  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(0, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.drawLine(79, 14, 79, 113);
  myGLCD.drawLine(1, 63, 158, 63);

 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  

// Draw a moving sinewave
  x=1;
  for (int i=1; i<(158*20); i++) 
  {
    x++;
    if (x==159)
      x=1;
    if (i>159)
    {
      if ((x==79)||(buf[x-1]==63))
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
      else
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
      myGLCD.drawPixel(x,buf[x-1]);
    }
    myGLCD.setColor(0,255,255);
    y=63+(sin(((i*2.5)*3.14)/180)*(40-(i / 100)));
    myGLCD.drawPixel(x,y);
    buf[x-1]=y;
  }

  delay(2000);
 
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  

// Draw some filled rectangles
  for (int i=1; i<6; i++)
  {
    switch (i)
    {
      case 1:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,255);
        break;
      case 2:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
        break;
      case 3:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,255,0);
        break;
      case 4:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
        break;
      case 5:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
        break;
    }
    myGLCD.fillRect(39+(i*10), 23+(i*10), 59+(i*10), 43+(i*10));
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);   

// Draw some filled, rounded rectangles
  for (int i=1; i<6; i++)
  {
    switch (i)
    {
      case 1:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,255);
        break;
      case 2:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
        break;
      case 3:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,255,0);
        break;
      case 4:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
        break;
      case 5:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
        break;
    }
    myGLCD.fillRoundRect(99-(i*10), 23+(i*10), 119-(i*10), 43+(i*10));
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);

 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  
// Draw some filled circles
  for (int i=1; i<6; i++)
  {
    switch (i)
    {
      case 1:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,255);
        break;
      case 2:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,0,0);
        break;
      case 3:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,255,0);
        break;
      case 4:
        myGLCD.setColor(0,0,255);
        break;
      case 5:
        myGLCD.setColor(255,255,0);
        break;
    }
    myGLCD.fillCircle(49+(i*10),33+(i*10), 15);
  }

  delay(2000);
    
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    

// Draw some lines in a pattern
  myGLCD.setColor (255,0,0);
  for (int i=14; i<113; i+=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(1, i, (i*1.44)-10, 112);
  }
  myGLCD.setColor (255,0,0);
  for (int i=112; i>15; i-=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(158, i, (i*1.44)-12, 14);
  }
  myGLCD.setColor (0,255,255);
  for (int i=112; i>15; i-=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(1, i, 172-(i*1.44), 14);
  }
  myGLCD.setColor (0,255,255);
  for (int i=15; i<112; i+=5)
  {
    myGLCD.drawLine(158, i, 171-(i*1.44), 112);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    

// Draw some random circles
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=22+random(116);
    y=35+random(57);
    r=random(20);
    myGLCD.drawCircle(x, y, r);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    
  

// Draw some random rectangles
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=2+random(156);
    y=16+random(95);
    x2=2+random(156);
    y2=16+random(95);
    myGLCD.drawRect(x, y, x2, y2);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);    

// Draw some random rounded rectangles
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=2+random(156);
    y=16+random(95);
    x2=2+random(156);
    y2=16+random(95);
    myGLCD.drawRoundRect(x, y, x2, y2);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  
 
  for (int i=0; i<100; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    x=2+random(156);
    y=16+random(95);
    x2=2+random(156);
    y2=16+random(95);
    myGLCD.drawLine(x, y, x2, y2);
  }

  delay(2000);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0,0,0);
  myGLCD.fillRect(1,14,158,113);
  
 myGLCD.setColor(0, 0, 255);
 myGLCD.drawLine(0, 79, 159, 79);  
 
  for (int i=0; i<5000; i++)
  {
    myGLCD.setColor(random(255), random(255), random(255));
    myGLCD.drawPixel(2+random(156), 16+random(95));
  }

  delay(2000);

  myGLCD.fillScr(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.fillRoundRect(10, 17, 149, 72);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 255, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(255, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.print("That's it!", CENTER, 20);
  myGLCD.print("Restarting in a", CENTER, 45);
  myGLCD.print("few seconds...", CENTER, 57);
  
  myGLCD.setColor(0, 255, 0);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(0, 0, 255);
  myGLCD.print("Runtime: (msecs)", CENTER, 103);
  myGLCD.printNumI(millis(), CENTER, 115);

  delay (5000);   
}

 

Once you’re confident with the physical connection, upload the sketch. It should result with output as shown in the video below:

Now that you have succesfully run the demonstration sketch – where to from here?

The library used is based on the uTFT library by Henning Karlsen. You can find all the drawing and other commands in the user manual – so download the pdf and enjoy creating interesting displays.

This post brought to you by pmdway.com – everything for makers and electronics enthusiasts, with free delivery worldwide.

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Although flip clocks may be extremely interesting electromechanical devices, with rolling flaps to show what time it is, they’re also fairly complicated if you want to build one yourself. Mark Wilson, however, took a different approach with his project, simulating the output on a 320×240 LCD display.

The clock is powered by an Arduino Uno and a DS3231 RTC module, allowing it to show the time, date, a blinking colon, and even the days until the trash/recycling needs to be put out. Alternate screens are available as well, including a Pong clock, triangle clock, and cube clock, which can be individually selected or set to randomly cycle if you so desire. 

For its housing, Wilson chose a minimal acrylic/standoff design that seems to suit it well, and you can see it in action in the short demo clip below.

The basic 16×2 LCD is an extremely popular component that we’ve seen used in more projects than we could possibly count. Part of that is because modern microcontrollers make it so easy to work with; if you’ve got an I2C variant of the display, it only takes four wires to drive it. That puts printing a line of text on one of these LCDs a step or two above blinking an LED on a digital pin on the hierarchy of beginner’s electronics projects.

What’s that? Even four wires is too many? In that case, you might be interested in this hack from [Vinod] which shows how you can drive the classic 16×2 with data and power on the same pair of wires. You’ll still need a microcontroller “backpack” for the LCD to interpret the modulated voltage, but if you’ve got an application for a simple remote display, this is definitely worth checking out.

The basic idea is to “blink” the 5 V line so quick that a capacitor on the LCD side can float the electronics over the dips in voltage. As long as one of the pins of the microcontroller is connected to the 5 V line before the capacitor, it will be able to pick up when the line goes low. With a high enough data rate and a large enough capacitor as a buffer, you’re well on the way to encoding your data to be displayed.

For the transmitting side, [Vinod] is using a Python script on his computer that’s sending out the text for the LCD over a standard USB to UART converter. That’s fed into a small circuit put together on a scrap of perfboard that triggers a MOSFET off of the UART TX line.

We actually covered the theory behind this technique years ago, but it’s always interesting to see somebody put together a real-world example. There might not be too many practical uses for this trick in the era of dirt-cheap microcontrollers bristling with I/O, but it might make a fun gag at your hackerspace.

These days, you could be forgiven for thinking driving an LCD from a microcontroller is easy. Cheap displays have proliferated, ready to go on breakout boards with controllers already baked in. Load up the right libraries and you’re up and running in a matter of minutes. However, turn your attention to trying to drive a random LCD you’ve yanked out of a piece of old equipment, and suddenly things get harder. [Ivan Kostoski] was in just such a position and decided to get down to work.

[Ivan]’s LCD was a 320×240 STN device salvaged from an old tape library. The display featured no onboard controller, and the original driver wasn’t easily repurposed. Instead, [Ivan] decided to drive it directly from an Arduino Uno.

This is easier said than done. There are stringent timing requirements that push the limits of the 8-bit platform, let alone the need for a negative voltage to drive the screen and further hardware to drive the backlight. These are all tackled in turn, with [Ivan] sharing his tips to get the most flexibility out of the display. Graphics and text modes are discussed, along with optimizations that could be possible through the varied use of available RAM and flash.

The code is available on Github. If you need inspiration for your own controllerless LCD driver. [Ben Heck] has done similar work too, using FPGA grunt to get the job done.

There are plenty of cheap projection clocks available, but as [Thomas Pototschnig] points out in this project, where’s the fun in just buying something? He set out to build a cheap projection clock using a small LCD screen, a cheap LED backlight, and a cheap lens. Cheap is the order of the day here, and [Thomas] succeeded admirably, creating a design that can be made with a couple of cheap PCBs, a 3D printer and the other parts mentioned above. He does a nice job of laying out his thinking in this design, showing how he calculated the projection path and made other decisions. His project has room to grow as well: it runs from an Arduino compatible STM32 that could handle many things other than showing the time if you were inclined to expand the project further.

[Thomas] has released all of the files he created for the project, including a number of options for the case that can use C-mount and Sony E-mount lenses. I’m not sure if you would want to attach your expensive camera lenses to a home-made projector like this, but it’s good to have the option if you have a dead E-mount lens that you were going to tear apart for parts anyway.

RC flying is one of those multi-disciplinary hobbies that really lets you expand your skill set. You don’t really need to know much to get started, but to get good you need to be part aeronautical engineer, part test pilot and part mechanic. But if you’re going to really go far you’ll also need to get good at electronics, which was part of the reason behind this Arduino servo tester.

[Peter Pokojny] decided to take the plunge into electronics to help him with the hobby, and he dove into the deep end. He built a servo tester and demonstrator based on an Arduino, and went the extra mile to give it a good UI and a bunch of functionality. The test program can cycle the servo under test through its full range of motion using any of a number of profiles — triangle, sine or square. The speed of the test cycle is selectable, and there’s even a mode to command the servo to a particular position manually. We’ll bet the build was quite a lesson for [Peter], and he ended up with a useful tool to boot.

Need to go even further back to basics than [Peter]? Then check out this primer on servos and this in-depth guide.

[via r/Arduino]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, misc hacks

ocat

Over the last couple of years, cat videos have become the undisputed champions of the web. Whether it’s kittens playing with their shadows to failed jump attempts to giving each another massages, we’re all guilty of watching a few of these clips from time to time (yes, even at work). Built with this in mind, oCat is a real-time tracker for feline-related activity on the Internet.

oCat consists of two parts: the oCat News Distractor and the Kitty o’Cat Twitter bot. Using Google’s YouTube API, the system works by continuously monitoring for new uploads, the number of new views each day, or a specific video that has received a remarkable amount of attention. It then tweets these stats and prints them out on thermal paper, stamping a paw print on the timeline for every 1,000 views.

Created by Annika Engelhardt, a digital media design master’s student at the University of the Arts in Bremen, oCat uses an Arduino along with an ESP Wi-Fi module, a servo, and an LCD screen. The aim of the project is to increase and reveal the amount of hours people spend watching cat videos online.

The cat is an altered Maneki-neko, holding a stamp using welding wire and hot glue. Even though I filled the stamp with extra ink, it did not work properly and I had to cut out the paw-shape from a sponge and glue it onto the original stamp.

The thermal printer used in the device needs a USB connection, so I used a Raspberry Pi to control it. I wrote a Python script that checks four different RSS news feeds for new posts every 15 minutes and prints one headline with a timestamp every minute.

The Twitter bot was programmed using Python and a library called tweepy. Most of the script is reading JSON files, juggling and comparing data and text files and in the end mixing up parts of a sentence to form a tweet. The bot will be enhanced in the future

fd014c44519451.5814af0a88949

Engelhardt exhibited the project at Galerie Flut in Bremen back in October. You can find more pictures and information on the project here.

[Joekutz] wanted to re-build an audio-rate function generator project that he found over on Instructables. By itself, the project is very simple: it’s an 8-bit resistor-ladder DAC, a nice enclosure, and the rest is firmware.

[Joekutz] decided this wasn’t enough. He needed an LCD display, a speaker, and one-hertz precision. The LCD display alone is an insane hack. He reverse-engineers a calculator simply to use the display. But instead of mapping each key on the calculator and typing each number in directly, he only taps the four 1, +, =, and clear keys. He can then enter arbitrary numbers by typing in the right number of ones and adding them up. 345 = 111 + 111 + 111 + 11 + 1. In his video, embedded below, he describes this as a “rather stupid” idea. We think it’s hilarious.

The meat of the project is the Arduino-based waveform generator, though. In the second video below, [joekutz] walks through the firmware in detail. If you’d like a simple introduction to DDS, check it out (or read up our more in-depth version).

He also makes custom detents for his potentiometers so that he can enter precise numerical values. These consist of special knobs and spring-clips that work together to turn a normal pot into a rough 8-way (or whatever) switch. Very cool.

So even if you don’t need an R-2R DAC based waveform generator, go check this project out. There’s good ideas at every turn.



Filed under: Arduino Hacks

I caught up with Federico Musto, President and CEO of Arduino SRL, at the 2016 Bay Area Maker Faire. Their company is showing off several new boards being prepared for release as early as next month. In partnership with Nordic Semi and ST Microelectronics they have put together some very powerful offerings which we discuss in the video below.

arduino-primo-core-alicepad-star-otto-lcdThe new boards are called Arduino Primo, Arduino Core, Arduino Alicepad, and Arduino Otto.

The first up is the Primo, a board built to adhere to the UNO form factor. This one is packing an interesting punch. The main micro is not an Atmel chip, but a Nordic nRF52832 ARM Cortex-M4F chip. Besides being a significantly fast CPU with floating-point support, the Nordic IC also has built-in Bluetooth LE and NFC capabilities, and the board has a PCB antenna built in.

On an UNO this is where the silicon would end. But on the Primo you get two more controllers: an ESP8266 and an STM32F103. The former is obvious, it brings WiFi to the party (including over-the-air programming). The STM32 chip is there to provide peripheral control and debugging. Debugging is an interesting development and is hard to come by in the Arduino-sphere. This will use the OpenOCD standard, with platformio.org as the recommended GUI.

The same nRF52 microcontroller is present on the Arduino Core and the Alicepad, which are targeted at wearable electronics. The circular form factor of the Alicepad mimics the familiar sewable form of the Lilypad.

Arduino Star Otto Arduino Star LCD

Arduino’s other offerings are where the horsepower really gets crazy. The Otto board boasts a gigantic STM32F469: a 169-pin ARM Cortex-M4F clocked at 180 MHz. The chip has a ridiculous assortment of built-in peripherals, and you’re not likely to run out of either pins or CPU cycles. It’s also got a hardware graphics accelerator, so it’s no surprise to find that the Otto has a DSI-IF connector on the back that is designed to plug into the LCD screen also being demonstrated at the event: a capacitive touch 480×800 display. The Otto also includes an ESP8266 to provide WiFi (why not, right?).

There are a few question marks in my mind on this one. First off, the Otto and the LCD have a product-family designator of “Star” which will be assigned to all the boards that feature the STM controllers. This seems a bit confusing (Star Otto, Star LCD, etc) but I guess they want to differentiate them from the “normal” Arduini. But are these devices becoming too complex to bear the Arduino name? Maybe, but the UNO is always going to be there for you and the new boards give you access to newer and more powerful features. Whether or not this complexity can be easily harnessed will depend on the software libraries and the IDE. After all, I think Donald Papp made a great point earlier in the week about the value of Arduino comfort in custom electronic work.

The Lawsuits

Finally, I asked Federico if there is any news about the Arduino versus Arduino trademark litigation. He spoke with us almost a year ago on the topic, but he had no new information for us at this point. (The US court case may be ruled on as early as July of this year, so there’s probably not much he could say, but I had to try.)

Federico spoke a little bit about the conflict between the two Arduinos, and said that it was brewing inside the company long before he got there. And it does appear that both companies calling themselves Arduino are trying to outdo each other with new boards and new initiatives, and going in different directions. If there is a bright side, it’s that this competition may end up building us better hardware than a single company would, because both are making bets on what will put them out ahead of the game.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, cons, Interviews

There are cheap LCDs available from China, and when plugged into an Arduino, these displays serve as useful interfaces or even shinier baubles for your latest project. [Michael] picked up a few of these displays in the hope of putting a few animated .GIFs on them. This is an impossible task with an ATMega microcontroller – the Arduino does not have the RAM or the processing power to play full-screen animations. It is possible to display 3D vector graphics, with an updated graphics library [Michael] wrote.

The display in question uses the ILI9341 LCD driver, found in the Adafruit library, and an optimized 3D graphics driver. Both of these drivers have noticeable flicker when the animation updates, caused by the delay between erasing a previous frame and when a new frame is drawn.

With 16-bit color and a resolution of 320×240 pixels, there simply isn’t enough memory or the processing power on an ATMega microcontroller to render anything in the time it takes to display a single frame. There isn’t enough memory to render off-screen, either. To solve this problem, [Michael] built his render library to only render pixels that are different from the previous frame.

Rendering in 3D presents its own problems, with convex surfaces that can overlap themselves. To fix this, [Michael]’s library renders objects from front to back – if the pixel doesn’t change, it doesn’t need to be rendered. This automatically handles occlusions.

In a demo application, [Michael]’s LCD and Arduino can display the Stanford bunny, a low-poly 3D face, and geometric object. It’s not a video game yet, but [Michael] thinks he can port the classic game Spectre to this platform and have it run at a decent frame rate.

Video of the demo below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks


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