Posts | Comments

Planet Arduino

Archive for the ‘pokemon’ Category

Go-Pokemon-Go-Game-Wallpaper-2016-Desktop-WallpaperDo you want to be the very best? Do you want to become a Pokemon Go master? Then here are 5 projects to help you level up and catch 'em all.

Read more on MAKE

The post 5 Projects Fit for a Pokemon Go Master appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Feb
14

Bill’s Arduino

arduino, arduino hacks, game boy, nintendo gameboy hacks, pokemon, trading Commenti disabilitati su Bill’s Arduino 

Pokemon is a great game by itself, but when you realize that not all of the ‘mon are available in one game, trading is required for completion, and some pokemon aren’t available without either hacking or going to a Toys ‘R Us in 1997, you start to see how insidious this game can be. Figuring he could finally complete the game with an Arduino, [Pepijn] decided to build a pokemon storage system.

This build was inspired by an earlier post that also spoofed trades. Instead of building this project around a high-power micro, [Pepijn] decided to use an Arduino. The protocol Game Boys use to communicate with each other is extremely well documented, although that’s only half the battle. Each game using the link cable used specialized data structures for transfer, and after grepping through a disassembled Pokemon ROM,  [Pepijn] figured out how everything worked.

The completed hardware keeps one Pokemon in the EEPROM of an Arduino. It’s not very fast if you want to catch all 151 Pokemon in the Gen 1 games, but any way you look at it, you’re going to be catching a lot of Magikarp anyway.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, nintendo gameboy hacks
Gen
01

Gotta Catch ‘Em All, With An Arduino

3ds, arduino hacks, ds, nintendo, nintendo ds hacks, pokemon, Shiny Pokemon, Teensy 3.0 Commenti disabilitati su Gotta Catch ‘Em All, With An Arduino 

PKMN

For every pokemon you encounter on your adventure to become the world’s greatest trainer, you have about a 1 in 8000 chance of that pokemon being ‘shiny’, or a different color than normal. Put an uncommon event in any video game, and of course a few people will take that feature to the limits of practicality: [dekuNukem] created the Poke-O-Matic, a microcontroller-powered device that breeds and captures shiny pokemon.

We’ve seen [dekuNukem]‘s setup for automatically catching shiny pokemon before, but the previous version was extremely limited. It only worked with a fishing rod, so unless you want a ton of shiny Magikarp the earlier setup wasn’t extremely useful.

This version uses two microcontrollers – an Arduino Micro and a Teensy 3.0 – to greatly expand upon the previous build. Now, instead of just fishing, [dekuNukem]‘s project can automatically hatch eggs, search patches of grass for shiny pokemon, and also automatically naming these new shiny pokemon and depositing them in the in-game pokemon storage system.

The new and improved version works a lot like the older fishing-only automated pokemon finder; a few wires soldered on to the button contacts control the game. The Teensy 3.0 handles the data logging of all the captured pokemon with an SD card and RTC.

What did [dekuNukem] end up with for all his effort? A lot of shiny pokemon. More than enough to build a great team made entirely out of shinies.

Video below, with all the code available through a link in the description.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, nintendo ds hacks
Nov
06

Pokemon X and Y: a Fully Automatic Shiny Finder made with Arduino Micro

arduino, Arduino micro, game, Gaming, Hacks, micro, nintendo, pokemon Commenti disabilitati su Pokemon X and Y: a Fully Automatic Shiny Finder made with Arduino Micro 

Pokemon Nintendo

How to enhance performance in gaming from an engineering point of view? dekuNukem created a hands-free finder  built using Arduino Micro to accomplish the task of chaining fishes at full speed and without fail at a touch of a button:

The fishing keeps going without human input until a shiny shows up, at which point it stops and sound a buzzer to notify the user.

It took 81 chains to catch a shiny in this case, but during my other tests it’s usually around 50, and sometimes even less than 20 chains get you one.

Watch the detailed video below and check the code:

 

 



  • Newsletter

    Sign up for the PlanetArduino Newsletter, which delivers the most popular articles via e-mail to your inbox every week. Just fill in the information below and submit.

  • Like Us on Facebook