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SmartOutlet

by embedded-lab.com

Infrared remote control for home appliances is a popular project among hobbyists and students. Smart Outlet is a similar project that provides an infrared controlled AC outlet to connect any electric appliance and has an integrated timer in it. The appliance can be turned on and off from several feet away using an IR remote. The device is Arduino-controlled and has a LCD display to provide a menu based interface to the user for its operation and settings.

Infra-red controlled smart AC outlet - [Link]

arduinoPlant

Next 21st of September Arduino Tour is finally landing in London for a one-day workshop, starting at 10am at The Maker Works London, UK. (max. 18 people).

This edition of the official Arduino workshop is focused on the world of the Internet of Things and will allow participants to experiment with a botanical kit including an Arduino YÚN, plants and sensors. The workshop teaches you how to turn your plants and virtually any object into connected, responsive elements using Arduino YÚN.

Arduino YÚN is the combination of a classic Arduino Leonardo and a small Linux computer, able to connect to a network or Internet via Ethernet or WiFi. Arduino boards are able to read inputs – light on a sensor, a finger on a button, or even a Twitter message – and turn it into an output – activating a motor, turning on an LED, publishing something online.

Check the program and book your participation >>

toot02

Toot is an interactive and sound-active toy designed for children aged between 3 and 6 years old that wants to enhance their auditory, music and language skills. It was developed by Federico Lameri as his thesis project of Master of Interaction Design at Supsi and prototyped using Arduino Leonardo.

The toy is composed by eight little cubical speaker boxes:

On each speaker children are able to record a sound. In order to listen back to the recorded sound the speaker must be shaken as if the sound was physically trapped into a box. After having recorded sounds on them, the speakers can be placed in a sequence after Mr.toot, and by tapping on his head it is possible to trigger the playback of the speakers in a sequence. toot is also matched with a mobile application that offers different kind of interactions and experiences. it allows to play some exercise that will teach children to listen, understand and catalog sound and melodies.

toot

The app expands the possibilities of interaction, offering different exercises created with the help of musicians and educators from different areas of expertise,  some of them are also inspired by a Montessori sensorial activity.

Take a look at the video interview with Montessori educator Fanny Bissa:

 

[Tony’s] $60 Bluetooth Head Mounted Display is compatible with Android and LinuxThe $80 Head Mounted Display was made with 3D printed frames and component housing modules with the optics bought from eBay. They are fully adjustable and function with Android or Linux-based mobile devices.

Read more on MAKE

Rune wirelessly rocking Maker Faire TrondheimOriginally prototyped using an Arduino, Aalberg Audio's guitar delay pedal and Bluetooth LE remote control now looks like a product, not a prototype.

Read more on MAKE

nepchune3Chuck Stephens is an artist, musician, hardware hacker and small boat builder who specializes in the use of recycled, repurposed and salvaged materials. Exhibiting at Maker Faire Orlando as Nepchune’s Noise Circus, Chuck says noise circuits provided his Eureka! moment in electronics.

Read more on MAKE

Electric long boards with Arduino-powered remote controlsA group of electronics students from HiST brought two very different projects to the faire—an underwater ROV and a bunch of electric long boards.

Read more on MAKE

Arduino-Simple-Wav-Player-2

How to make a simple wav player using Arduino? This method  is smarter than “Simple Wav Player Using Arduino 1″. which actually should not be given the name “wav player” because it’s not flexible at all for the limitation from Arduino flash. This tutorial and set of kits, is complementary to that. By contrast, it gets greatly improved in the flexibility and sorts out the limitation problem by storing the converted music file into a SD card. Makers can build better music player on this basis.

How to make a simple wav player using Arduino - [Link]

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Heidi Røneid with an Arduino Ethernet microprocessor. (Photo: Tore Zakariassen, NRK)

When The Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK) planned the television broadcast of the Chess Olympiad 2014 in Tromsø, Norway, they encountered a challenge: how to mix video, graphics and the results of many ongoing chess games simultaneously, requiring 16 cameras for the games going on at the same time?

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On their blog you can find a long and nice post about how they found the solution using Arduino Uno, Arduino Ethernet Shield and the library for Arduino to control such Atem switchers written by Kasper Skårhøj:

At first, the idea was to use a computer with a webcam for each of the 16 games, then mix video images, background animation and results in software on each of them.

Afterwards the finished mix of images would be streamed to separate channels in our web player, so that the online audience would be able to choose which game they wanted to follow. This solution would also provide our outside broadcasting van (OB van) with 16 finished video sources composed of video, graphics and results. This would make the complex job of mixing all video signals much easier.

After thorough thinking we came to the conclusion that for our web-audience, it would be better to skip the stream of individual games, and spend our resources on building websites that could present all games in the championship via HTML in real time. This would also give the audience the opportunity to scroll back and forth in the moves and recall all the previous games in the championship. We started working on it immediately, and you can find the result on our website nrk.no/sjakk.

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Customizable, hackable real-time display used to inform you of notifications, tasks, metrics, emails and many more! by Jack Trowbridge:

Noteu is one of the first customizable, hackable real-time displays that keeps you updated in life, social media and business. Instead of needing to check multiple websites, apps or open any windows Noteu tells you what you need to know at a glance all in one place. With its easy to use Java application compatible on Windows, Mac and Linux you can choose amongst a wide range of updates and alerts with huge customization. Noteu being Open Source, based on the Ardunio platform, interfaceable with Java API’s and a simple serial protocol allows for infinite hacking.

Noteu: USB Hackable Real-Time Display - [Link]



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