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If you want a way to measure magnetic fields on the go, then look no further than this tiny device from Instructables user “rgco.”

The portable magnetometer was made using just a couple of common parts, including an SS49E linear Hall effect sensor, an Arduino Nano, a 0.96” OLED screen, and a push button.

All the electronics are concealed inside a Tic Tac box, which holds the components together and provides a window for the display. The SS49E itself is isolated from the rest of the unit via a ballpoint pen tube, which allows it to be placed in narrow openings without interference. 

For increased accuracy, the sensor was calibrated using a cylindrical electromagnet, and the project was prototyped using an Uno before being stuffed into its rather small enclosure.

Board games can be fun, but what happens when you need more than six, 12, or even 20 possibilities to decide your character’s fate? One could of course use several dice, or an online simulator, but creator “Rehaan33” built something much more elegant in the form of a dedicated dice terminal.

This device takes user input from a pair of rotary switches to the dice high limit, then uses an Arduino Nano to generate a random value when its “roll” button is pressed. Limit and result values are shown on their own seven-segment LED displays. 

The enclosure for the unit is beautifully constructed out of ash wood and black acrylic, which should fit in nicely with a variety of games, including Warhammer 40,000 for which it was designed.

Apparently not content with simply brewing his coffee to perfection, Alex Campbell can actually take control of the roast itself thanks to his beautiful fluid bed roasting rig.

His DIY device is constructed using a variety of stainless steel and aluminum components, along with a transparent roasting chamber. A spa blower is employed to suck waste out and agitate beans during the process.

The machine’s heating element is driven by a solid-state relay and a thermocouple provides feedback. An Arduino board is tasked with controlling the system, while user interface and higher-level control are handled via a laptop linked to it over serial. 

It’s an amazing design as seen in the two videos below — all to get that perfect cup!

Adnan.R.Khan recently decided to give his room’s sliding door latch an upgrade by designing a mechanism to open and close it, using little more than an Arduino Uno and Bluetooth module. 

His automated device is operated via a smartphone app written in MIT App Inventor, and it employs a shield to control a small DC motor. The motor then pulls a cable wrapped around two pulleys in order to move the simple barrel latch in or out.

It’s an amazing display of what can be done with parts at hand and basic tools, and could certainly inspire other home security hacks. Be sure to check out the build process and the setup in action below! 

Using an Arduino Nano 33 IoT, Jithin Sanal designed a home monitoring system capable of detecting noxious gases with an MQ2 sensor as well as sensing temperature, pressure, humidity, and ambient light via a BME280 sensor and an LDR. All of this is mounted onto a custom PCB that’s powered by a 9V battery, or one could also use a 9-12V adapter if more convenient.

Data is passed on to Ubidots over WiFi, which provides a configurable dashboard for viewing the readings anywhere in the world. The system can also send notifications via SMS, email, or Telegram to let you know if anything is awry.

For enthusiasts, the Fundamentals Exam is the first tier in the Arduino Certification Program (ACP), designed to test entrants knowledge in Arduino-related electronics, programming, and physical computing.

The exam is available for everyone interested in officially certifying their skills and knowledge on Arduino, that could, for example, be referred to in a resume for academic or professional purposes.

Get your students, colleagues and friends certified!

The Fundamentals Exam is now also open to schools, academic institutions, universities, and companies that are interested in getting their students and employees officially certified!

The Fundamentals Certification offers the right balance of academic excellence and real world skills to give students the confidence and motivation they need to succeed both in educational and professional environments.

It is a great opportunity for companies who are interested in certifying their employees to refresh and add new skills to their repertoire.

Want to learn more? Additional information can be found here.

El examen de Certificación Fundamentals, está ahora disponible en Español e Italiano

Para entusiastas, el examen de Certificación Fundamentals, es el primer nivel del Programa de certificación Arduino (ACP), diseñado para evaluar el conocimiento de los participantes en electrónica, programación y computación física relacionadas con Arduino.

El examen está disponible para todos los interesados ??en certificar oficialmente sus habilidades y conocimientos en Arduino, que podrían, por ejemplo, mencionarse en un currículum con fines académicos o profesionales.

¡Certifica a tus estudiantes, colegas y equipo de trabajo!

La certificación también está disponible para escuelas, instituciones académicas, universidades y empresas que estén interesadas en certificar oficialmente a sus estudiantes y equipo de trabajo.

La Certificación Fundamentals ofrece el equilibrio adecuado entre excelencia académica y habilidades del mundo real, para brindar a los estudiantes la confianza y la motivación que necesitan para tener éxito tanto en entornos académicos como profesionales.

También es una gran posibilidad para compañías que están interesadas en certificar a su equipo de trabajo para actualizar y agregar nuevas habilidades a su repertorio.

Para saber más visita: https://store.arduino.cc/digital/cert_fundamentals.

Siamo lieti di annunciare che l’esame per la certificazione Arduino Fundamentals è da adesso disponibile anche in spagnolo e italiano! 

Desideriamo rendere accessibile la Certificazione alle scuole, alle istitutuzioni, università e aziende che siano interessate a certificare ufficialmente i propri studenti e dipendenti! La certificazione Arduino Fundamentals offre il giusto equilibrio fra l’acquisizione di abilità accademiche e lavorative, fornendo agli studenti la sicurezza e la motivazione necessarie per riuscire nel mondo accademico e professionale. E’ inoltre un increndibile possibilità per le aziende interessate ad aggionarne, migliorare e/o accrescere le capacità dei propri dipendenti.

Per saperne di più, visitate: https://store.arduino.cc/digital/cert_fundamentals.

Home automation is a popular project to undertake but its complexity can quickly become daunting, especially if you go further than controlling a few lights (or if you’re a renter). To test the waters you may want to start with something like this home safety monitor, which is an IoT device based on an Arduino. It allows remote monitoring of a home for things such as temperature, toxic gasses, light, and other variables, which is valuable even if you don’t need or want to control anything.

The device is built around an Arduino Nano 33 IOT which has WiFi and Bluetooth capabilities as well as some integrated security features. This build features a number of sensors including pressure/humidity, a gas/smoke detector, and a light sensor. To report all of the information it gathers around the home, an interface with Ubidots is configured to allow easy (and secure) access to the data gathered by the device.

The PCB and code for the project are all provided on the project page, and there are a number of other options available if Ubidots isn’t your preferred method of interfacing with the Internet of Things. You might even give Mozilla’s WebThings a shot if you’re so inclined.

In his latest video, Will Cogley has created an animatronic heart so realistic that you might wonder if it’s the actual thing. 

The device is made out of molded silicon with fake blood poured on top to enhance the effect, and inside a trio of servo motors push the lower and upper sections of the prop out in a very lifelike pattern. 

Control is via an Arduino Micro along with an I2C servo controller, while power is provided by an external tether. A potentiometer on the back is used to vary heartbeat speed. 

He also made a simpler — and less potentially terrifying — version with a cloth exterior. This one is battery-operated and runs on a motor and linkage system, perhaps making it good for a nice portable joke!

[Adnan.R.Khan] had a sliding door latch plus an Arduino, and hacked together this cool but simple app controlled door lock.

Mechanically the lock consists of a Solarbotics GM3 motor, some Meccano, and a servo arm. A string is tied between two pulleys and looped around the slide of a barrel latch. When the motor moves back and forth it’s enough to slide the lock in and out. Electronically an Arduino and a Bluetooth module provide the electronics. The system runs from a 9V battery, and we’re interested to know whether there were any tricks pulled to make the battery last.

The system’s software is a simple program built in MIT App Inventor. Still, it’s pretty cool that you can get functionally close to a production product with parts that are very much lying around. It also makes us think of maybe keeping our childhood Meccano sets a little closer to the bench!

[Adnan.R.Khan] had a sliding door latch plus an Arduino, and hacked together this cool but simple app controlled door lock.

Mechanically the lock consists of a Solarbotics GM3 motor, some Meccano, and a servo arm. A string is tied between two pulleys and looped around the slide of a barrel latch. When the motor moves back and forth it’s enough to slide the lock in and out. Electronically an Arduino and a Bluetooth module provide the electronics. The system runs from a 9V battery, and we’re interested to know whether there were any tricks pulled to make the battery last.

The system’s software is a simple program built in MIT App Inventor. Still, it’s pretty cool that you can get functionally close to a production product with parts that are very much lying around. It also makes us think of maybe keeping our childhood Meccano sets a little closer to the bench!



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