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With all the Flappy Bird clones floating around in the ether after the game’s unexpected success, there are some that are better than others. And by better, we mean, hacked together from misc hardware. If you’ve got an Arduino on hand, then you’re half way to making your own:

The “Minimalist” Version

[aron.bordin] created his own Flappy Bird game with a short list of parts some of us likely have lying around on our bench. An Arduino loaded with the appropriate code is wired to a 16×16 LED matrix, which apparently displays the minimal amount of visual information you’d need to play the game. The only other parts required are a single pushbutton and resistor tethered on a breadboard to control your flapping. With the wire hookup laid out by convenient diagrams and the libraries required for the code all found on the same page, this is easily something one could bang out in an afternoon. If afterwards you still find yourself with more time to kill than you can stand to play Flappy Birds, there is always the option of fashioning a humorously-sized cell phone case to squeeze it all into… which we’d like to see.

The “Fancy” Version

If you want more resolution than solid colored LEDs, or you just have a fondness for the terrifying bird abstraction the game is known for, you can switch out the 16×16 matrix for a Nokia LCD screen. [Huy’s] rendition of this build over on Hackaday.io will deliver a “more detailed” graphic for the game, and is still roughly just as easy to assemble. Similarly, an Ardunio is loaded with the smarts required to generate the game, along with a single pushbutton tacked on for control. The code and the daunting (/sarcasm) two steps needed to wire the Arduino to the screen can be found on his project’s page.

If you must kill boredom playing Flappy Bird, there is no excuse not to do so on something you made yourself.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Arduino Tutorial: GSM/GPRS SHIELD (SIM900) SMS Send and Receive Tutorial on Arduino Uno

In this video we are going to see, how easy it is to send and receive SMS messages using the Arduino GSM/GPRS shield (with SIM900 chip) from Tinysine. The shield is capable of sending and receiving SMS messages as well as making and receiving phone calls. It can also connect to the Internet using the GPRS network. But we will take a look at this later on in another video.

In this video, we connect to the GSM network of COSMOTE in Greece and we send an SMS message to a cell phone. Then we reply to Arduino and read the message in the Serial Monitor in the computer.

How to send and receive SMS messages with Arduino - [Link]

win_bean_loader_1

SAN FRANCISCO and MINNEAPOLIS, January 26, 2015 — Punch Through Design, a hardware and software development firm that brings Bluetooth Low Energy hacking to the masses, has released the Windows Bean Loader, the first-ever wireless Arduino programming app for Windows users. Using the loader app, Windows-based developers and hobbyists can easily upload code to their LightBlue Bean and experience the power of Bluetooth Low Energy, without cables or a physical connection to the LightBlue Bean.

“The LightBlue Bean represents a new method of wirelessly interacting with prototypes and projects; says Colin Karpfinger, founder and CEO, Punch Through Design. Previously, only Mac OS X and iOS users could program their Beans, and now we are extending that functionality to Windows users.

The full-featured app, available from the Windows Store, fills a void for Windows-based developers and DIYers looking to create smartphone-controlled devices.

Windows Bean Loader Enables Wireless Arduino Programming from Surface Pro Tablets - [Link]

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Arduino Laser Trip Wire

alarm, arduino, laser Commenti disabilitati 

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by ronnietucker @ instructables.com:

So, first thing I did was to get the LCD and keypad working together.

For this I pretended that it was some sort of arm/disarm (or entry/exit) thing.

My code for this part is at: http://pastebin.com/YndLneqm.

Getting the LCD wired up was tricky as most wiring diagrams for it don’t show the last two pins wired up and these are required for the back light. Check my snazzy Fritzing wiring diagram to see how I wired up my LCD screen, pot (for adjusting brightness) and keypad. The pins for them all are also mentioned in my code.

Arduino Laser Trip Wire - [Link]

beeuno

Maker Faire Rome video interviews – “What have you built with Arduino?” – A couple of new protagonists for our short series:

  • Bee Uno – Arduino-controlled DJ midi controller, interview with the makers

 

  • ITIS-LS – F. Giordani students’ quad ambient controller

Explore playlist on Youtube >>

Materiatut7

This week we are presenting you a new tutorial on 3d printing of Lego-compatible pieces with Materia 101. Kristoffer designed a brick with the parametric 3d modeler FreeCAD that can hold a small servo. Following the 10-step instructions  you can easily add wheels to robots built in LEGO and  use specific servos with different sizes.


Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

materiatut7-3

vlcsnap-2015-01-23-15h12m16s206Just for fun, I designed my own variation of a treasure hunt game

Read more on MAKE

[Nikhil] has been experimenting with human interface devices (HID) in relation to security. We’ve seen in the past how HID can be exploited using inexpensive equipment. [Nikhil] has built his own simple device to drop malicious files onto target computers using HID technology.

The system runs on a Teensy 3.0. The Teensy is like a very small version of Arduino that has built-in functionality for emulating human interface devices, such as keyboards. This means that you can trick a computer into believing the Teensy is a keyboard. The computer will treat it as such, and the Teensy can enter keystrokes into the computer as though it were a human typing them. You can see how this might be a security problem.

[Nikhil’s] device uses a very simple trick to install files on a target machine. It simply opens up Powershell and runs a one-liner command. Generally, this commend will create a file based on input received from a web site controlled by the attacker. The script might download a trojan virus, or it might create a shortcut on the user’s desktop which will run a malicious script. The device can also create hot keys that will run a specific script every time the user presses that key.

Protecting from this type off attack can be difficult. Your primary option would be to strictly control USB devices, but this can be difficult to manage, especially in large organizations. Web filtering would also help in this specific case, since the attack relies on downloading files from the web. Your best bet might be to train users to not plug in any old USB device they find lying around. Regardless of the methodology, it’s important to know that this stuff is out there in the wild.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, security hacks

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by micahmelnyk @ instructables.com:

In short: I developed a portable, battery powered device that sounds an alarm when your bag or purse is moved. Once armed, can only be turned off by your secret code.

The device is built off an Arduino compatible Trinket Pro, using an off-the-shelf project box with PCB.

Bag movement alarm for theft prevention - [Link]

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TinyCompass

arduino, ATmega328, compass Commenti disabilitati 

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by TinyCircuits @ instructables.com:

In this Instructable, we will be building a compass using the TinyShield Compass as well as the Circle Edge Led shield.

After getting your boards and battery, the Arduino IDE will be the first thing to download if you have not done so already. When the IDE has been loaded go to tools, board, and select Arduino Pro or Pro Mini (3.3V, 8MHz) w/ ATmega328.

TinyCompass - [Link]



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