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Electric Arduino Go-kart

arduino, go-kart Commenti disabilitati 

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by gizzmotronics @ instructables.com:

Hello everyone! As the title says, I built an electric go kart which is powered by arduino! Here’s a quick video to make you certain that this is the next thing you’re going to build.

Electric Arduino Go-kart - [Link]

P1010049-600x450

µVolume USB volume control project by Rupert Hirst of RunAwayBrainz:

µVolume T-32 USB Volume Control update, featuring infra red media control

Features:
-Arduino Compatible (Atmel Atmega32u4)
-Manual volume adjustment using the rotary encoder
-(IR) Infra red remote control of volume and multimedia controls
-Apple remote or user defined
-Visual and audible Feedback
-RGB Lighting Customization’s

[via]

uVolume T-32 USB volume & media control - [Link]

barmixvahIf you’d like a “cool refreshing drink,” but don’t really feel like mixing it yourself, why not just build a robot to do it for you? It might not save time in the long run (I seriously hope not), but as creator Yu Jiang Tham notes, “It’s great fun at […]

Read more on MAKE

digioxide-1In an effort to raise public awareness of environmental pollution, artist Dmitry Morozov has created a device called that makes digital prints from the pollutants it detects.

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screenshot

by dzzie @ github.com

The Dht22 sensor is installed in the humidor.

The arduino takes a reading every 20 minutes, and uploads the data to your webserver.

The PHP script will record the data to the database. If the temp or humidity is out of desired range, it will send you an email alert.

Alerts must be manually cleared latter by logging into the web site, so you are not spammed, before you get a chance to fix it.

When you add water, push the select button on the LCD sheild to record it. This will be saved to the db as well. Power resets will also be recorded to the database.

See screen shot for example web report.

Temperature controlled humidor with web logging, monitoring and alerts - [Link]

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Edashboard

by R-B @ embedded-lab.com:

This electronic dashboard for a bicycle uses an Arduino and a few other parts to create a light control system and an LED speedometer. It is powered with eight 1.5V batteries connected in series. Six LEDs on the dashboard indicates how fast are you going on your bicycle.

Electronic dashboard for a bicycle - [Link]

arduino powered go cart

Oh how times have changed. Back in the 30’s the VW Beetle was designed to be cheap, simple and easy for the typical owner to maintain themselves. Nowadays, every aspect of modern cars are controlled by some sort of computer. At least our go-carts are spared from this non-tinkerable electronic nightmare…. well, that’s not completely true anymore. History is repeating itself as [InverseCube] has built an electronic go-cart fully controlled by an Arduino. Did I forget to mention that [InverseCube] is only 15 years old?

The project starts of with an old gas-powered go-cart frame. Once the gas engine was removed and the frame cleaned up and painted, a Hobbywing Xerun 150A brushless electronic speed controller (ESC) and a Savox BSM5065 450Kv motor were mounted in the frame which are responsible for moving the ‘cart down the road. A quantity of three 5-cell lithium polymer batteries wired in parallel provide about 20 volts to the motor which results in a top speed around 30mph. Zipping around at a moderate 15mph will yield about 30 minutes of driving before needing to be recharged. There is a potentiometer mounted to the steering wheel for controlling the go-cart’s speed. The value of the potentiometer is read by an Arduino which in turn sends the appropriate PWM signal to the ESC.

In addition to the throttle control, the Arduino is also responsible for other operational aspects of the vehicle. There are a bunch of LED lights that serve as headlights, tail lights, turn signals, brake lights and even one for a backup light. You may be wondering why an Arduino should be used to control something as simple as brake or headlights. [InverseCube] has programmed in some logic in the code that keeps the break lights on if the ESC brake function is enabled, if the throttle is below neutral or if the ESC enable switch is off. The headlights have 3 brightnesses, all controlled via PWM signal provided by the microcontroller.

There is also an LCD display mounted to the center of the steering wheel. This too is controlled by the Arduino and displays the throttle value, status of the lights and the voltage of the battery.

 

via reddit

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, transportation hacks
Fig. 13: Rounded polycarbonate acoustic deflection encasementBuilding an 8'-long robotic arm with a chainsaw on the end is no small feat. Here's how it was done.

Read more on MAKE

DSC_1570

David Cuartielles held a worshop at Campus Party Berlin introducing  Arduino and the cool things you can do with it. Some months later, on of the students, Sanjeet Raj Pandey, wrote him to reveal that the event was a life changing moment.

After that Sajeet decided  to share his knowledge and experience organising workshops in a rural city called Janakpur in Nepal. In that occasion a 100 participants got introduced to Arduino. They learnt how to blink LEDs, work with a temperature sensor, light sensor, ultrasound sensor and also to make a DIY Arduino:

Most of it was financed by myself and a bit of donation from Telecommunication department -Technical University of Berlin and Berlin Promotion Agency.

I like to make things which are real and can be put to work for society . Making things, one just cannot see but also touch is awesome.

Hope you will share Janakpur (Nepal) as one more place with Arduino. I would be keeping up pace and will be doing more such projects, workshops, seminars, remote sessions, etc for students in Nepal.

These are some pictures from the workshops:

DSC_1509 DSC_1512 DSC_1513 DSC_1514 DSC_1516 DSC_1570 DSC_1578 DSC_1582 DSC_1584 DSC_1599 DSC_1613 DSC_1630

Do you have a similar story to share? Submit it to our blog!

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by MakerSpark Industries @ instructables.com:

This Instructable is about how to create an Arduino PIR motion sensor for your room or office, using parts available from your local Radio Shack! Whether you’re looking for a cool and easy-to-build security sensor, or an awesome first project to dive into the world of Arduino, Microcontrollers, and electronics, this project is for you. (This project really is easy. Take it from me, I’m 12, and I’ve only had my Arduino for a week and a half.)

Arduino PIR Motion Sensor - [Link]



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