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Arduino sound to Laser

arduino, laser, servo, sound, Turnigy Commenti disabilitati su Arduino sound to Laser 


Kingduino Uno R3 Compatible Microcontroller - Atmel ATmega328

Turnigy TGY-SM-3317SR 360? Analog Robot Servo 2.2kg / 86RPM / 19g

Took the electronics from two of these and connected them to the servo motors to control the mirrors
Turnigy TGY-SM-3317SR 360? Analog Robot Servo 2.2kg / 86RPM / 19g


Kingduino Compatible 5V 650nm PCB Laser Diode Module

Microphone Sound Input Module

Russian blue cat
I found this cat really helped with the programming 







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04

Arduino Stepper Motors

arduino, motor, Stepper Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Stepper Motors 

F3OCNRXIBL62HLA.MEDIUM

by cornelam @ instructables.com:

When we need precision and repeatability, a stepper motor is always the solution. With the way it is designed, a stepper can only move from one step to the next and fix in that position. A typical motor has 200 steps per revolution; if we tell the motor to go 100 steps in one direction, it will turn exactly 180 degrees. It gets interesting when we only tell it to go one step and it turns exactly 1.8 degrees.

Arduino Stepper Motors – [Link]

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Arduino Uno assembled in US now available in the Store

adafruit, arduino, Arduino Store US, arduino uno, Assembled in USA, Featured, uno, USA Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Uno assembled in US now available in the Store 

ArduinoUno

We are proud to share with you the link to purchase the first batch of Arduino Uno ($24.95) assembled in US by Adafruit and created by #TeamArduinoCC.

The partnership started last May when Massimo announced it during Maker Faire San Mateo. Right after our team at Arduino and Adafruit team did all the best they could the make it happen on July the 4th, Independence Day! Now, it’s real! Arduino Uno can be back in your hands allowing you to create amazing interactive projects and, at the same time, supporting the open source community!

adafruitArduino

The partnership started last May when Massimo announced it during Maker Faire San Mateo. Right after that day, our team at Arduino and Adafruit team did all the best they could the make it happen on July the 4th, Independence Day! Now, it’s real! Arduino Uno can be back in your hands allowing you to create amazing interactive projects and, at the same time, supporting the open source community!

If you take a close look at the back of the board, you’ll find the “Assembled in USA” tag and also the new Genuino logo, Arduino sister-brand. We are adding the Genuino logo to make it easier for the Arduino community to spot original boards and we are going to include this logo to all genuine Arduino boards from now on (like we did for the recently-released Arduino Zero).
ArduinoUnoBack

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Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial

arduino, clock, display, vfd Commenti disabilitati su Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial 

FP770N2IBL0P092.MEDIUM

by Kesselwagen @ instructables.com

Vacuum fluorescent displays look really kinda fancy and cool to me, I really love the blue-breen color. That’s why I decided to write this Instructable about a clock based on this technology. This is my first instructable here, showing you how I have designed built my clock and how you can build yourself exactly the same or a similar clock that utilizes the VFD display. I’m not a native speaker – just for you to know if you’re wondering why some sentences might make no sense at all.

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial – [Link]

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03

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial

arduino, clock, display, vfd Commenti disabilitati su Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial 

FP770N2IBL0P092.MEDIUM

by Kesselwagen @ instructables.com

Vacuum fluorescent displays look really kinda fancy and cool to me, I really love the blue-breen color. That’s why I decided to write this Instructable about a clock based on this technology. This is my first instructable here, showing you how I have designed built my clock and how you can build yourself exactly the same or a similar clock that utilizes the VFD display. I’m not a native speaker – just for you to know if you’re wondering why some sentences might make no sense at all.

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial – [Link]

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Arduinos (and other AVRs) Write To Own Flash

arduino, arduino hacks, AVR, bootloader, flash memory, optiboot, Programming Commenti disabilitati su Arduinos (and other AVRs) Write To Own Flash 

In this post on the Arduino.cc forums and this blog post, [Majek] announced that he had fooled the AVR microcontroller inside and Arduino into writing user data into its own flash memory during runtime. Wow!

[Majek] has pulled off a very neat hack here. Normally, an AVR microcontroller can’t write to its own flash memory except when it’s in bootloader mode, and you’re stuck using EEPROM when you want to save non-volatile data. But EEPROM is scarce, relative to flash.

Now, under normal circumstances, writing into the flash program memory can get you into trouble. Indeed, the AVR has protections to prevent code that’s not hosted in the bootloader memory block from writing to flash. But of course, the bootloader has to be able to program the chip, so there’s got to be a way in.

The trick is that [Majek] has carefully modified the Arduino’s Optiboot bootloader so that it exposes a flash-write (SPM) command at a known location, so that he can then use this function from outside the bootloader. The AVR doesn’t prevent the SPM from proceeding, because it’s being called from within the bootloader memory, and all is well.

The modified version of the Optiboot bootloader is available on [Majek]’s Github.  If you want to see how he did it, here are the diffs. A particularly nice touch is that this is all wrapped up in easy-to-write code with a working demo. So next time you’ve filled up the EEPROM, you can reach for this hack and log your data into flash program memory.

Thanks [Koepel] for the tip!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
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Keyboardio joins Arduino At Heart Program

arduino, ArduinoAtHeart, Featured, keyboard, kickstarter Commenti disabilitati su Keyboardio joins Arduino At Heart Program 

Keyboardino_post

After two and a half years of work and dozens of prototypes, Kaia Dekker and Jesse Vincent have launched Keyboardio Model 01 on Kickstarter: an heirloom-grade mechanical keyboard designed for serious typists.

As you’ll see from the video presentation below, the Model 01 is not just a keyboard. Kaia and Jesse actually re-envisioned the way we type to make it feel great. On top of that it has a beautiful hardwood enclosure and it ships with source code and a screwdriver. The Model 01’s firmware is a regular Arduino sketch you can explore and change yourself.

The project reached its target in the first few hours and you have a few more days to get one!

In the meantime they also joined the Arduino at Heart Program to make it fully customizable with the Arduino IDE:

We’ve built the Model 01 around the same ATmega32U4 microcontroller that Arduino uses in the Arduino Leonardo. Early on, we figured we’d eventually switch away to a cheaper ARM microcontroller, but then we fell in love with just how easy Arduino makes it for a new programmer to get up to speed. For all intents and purposes, the Model 01’s brain is a regular Arduino. You can update your keyboard from the Arduino IDE. If you want to make your keyboard do something special, there are thousands of Arduino resources online to help you out.

 

Learn more about Keyboardio on Kickstarter, where you can pre-order it and support Jesse & Kaia, who made it with love (and just a bit of obsession).

keyboardio

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48 Solenoids Transform This 1960s Typewriter into a Computer Printer

arduino, Computers & Mobile, Corona, Midi, pcb, Retro, solenoid, Tufts, typewriter, vintage Commenti disabilitati su 48 Solenoids Transform This 1960s Typewriter into a Computer Printer 

typewriter-solenoidsSeveral years ago, Chris Gregg, a Tufts University lecturer and computer engineer, received a letter from his friend Erica. This wouldn’t be so unusual, except that it was typed on an actual typewriter, not a printer. Gregg is a fan of vintage typewriters, but, as with myself, makes many mistakes, […]

Read more on MAKE

The post 48 Solenoids Transform This 1960s Typewriter into a Computer Printer appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

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ESP8266 WiFi Shield for Arduino and other micros

arduino, ESP8266, wifi Commenti disabilitati su ESP8266 WiFi Shield for Arduino and other micros 

FJMAB9BIBGCQ2Z8.MEDIUM

by drmpf @ instructables.com:

This ESP8266-01 WiFi Shield is an alternative to the Very Cheap/Simple Wifi Shield for Arduino and other micros. The Very Cheap/Simple Wifi Shield for Arduino and other micros uses an Adafruit HUZZAH ESP8266 module and is the simplest to wire up. However if you already have an ESP8266 module, you can use these instructions to make a WiFi Shield using it.

This instructable uses the ESP8266-01 module, if you have one of the other ESP8266 bare modules, provided the module has GPIO0 and GPIO2 available, then you can use these instructions. If the module makes GPIO15 accessible YOU MUST connect it to GND via a resistor with a value between 3K3 and 10K.

ESP8266 WiFi Shield for Arduino and other micros – [Link]

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ESP8266 WiFi Shield for Arduino and other micros

arduino, ESP8266, wifi Commenti disabilitati su ESP8266 WiFi Shield for Arduino and other micros 

FJMAB9BIBGCQ2Z8.MEDIUM

by drmpf @ instructables.com:

This ESP8266-01 WiFi Shield is an alternative to the Very Cheap/Simple Wifi Shield for Arduino and other micros. The Very Cheap/Simple Wifi Shield for Arduino and other micros uses an Adafruit HUZZAH ESP8266 module and is the simplest to wire up. However if you already have an ESP8266 module, you can use these instructions to make a WiFi Shield using it.

This instructable uses the ESP8266-01 module, if you have one of the other ESP8266 bare modules, provided the module has GPIO0 and GPIO2 available, then you can use these instructions. If the module makes GPIO15 accessible YOU MUST connect it to GND via a resistor with a value between 3K3 and 10K.

ESP8266 WiFi Shield for Arduino and other micros – [Link]



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