Posts | Comments

Planet Arduino

Archive for the ‘arduino’ Category

Instructables

We featured Nikodem’s bike tachometer last September on this blog. He’s now sharing with us another DIY project called DIY Arduino controlled Egg-Bot. It’s a DIY version of the original Egg-bot created by Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories.

You can follow the step-by-step tutorial on Instructables and here’s a preview of the bill of materials you’ll need to make the project at home:

– Stepper motor with 200 steps per revolution (x2)  / I use 12V and 0,33A but you can use other.
– Stepper motor driver A4988 (x2)
Arduino Uno
– Power supply for stepper
– Micro servo
– Plastic plate, wood
– 40cm screws x3 and 12 nuts for it’s
– Two Lego wheels
– Markers in different colors
– Drill, knife, saw, screwdriver, double sided tape, wood glue, wire, soldering iron, rubber bands
– Everything you need to make PCB

Instructables2

 

He started off making an AVR synthesized guitar, but [Erix] ended up with much more: a complete six-voice AVR wavetable synthesis song machine that’ll run on an ATMega328 — for instance, on an Arduino Uno.

If you’re an AVR coder, or interested in direct-digital synthesis or PWM audio output, you should have a look at his code (zip file). If you’d just like to use the chip to make some tunes, have a gander at the video below the break.

It’s pretty sweet to get six channels of 31.25 kHz sampled 8-bit audio running on a 16MHz chip. The code underlying it works through some tricky optimization in the sample update routine (UpdateVoiceSample() in play.c if you’re reading along) and by carefully prioritizing the time critical elements.

For instance, the pitch is updated once every two PWM samples, I/O and other auxiliary player tasks every eights samples, and the sound’s dynamic volume envelope is only recalculated every 48 samples. Doing the slow math as infrequently as possible lets [Erix] make his timing.

And to round out the tools, [Erix] also provides wavetable editors and song generators in Lua to compile the tables of music data that the AVR routines need to run.

If you’re not impressed by this bit of AVR C coding, then you’ve not tried to implement something similar yourself.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, musical hacks

The most fascinating project you can build is something with a bunch of blinky hypnotic LEDs, and the easiest way to build this is with a bunch of individually addressable RGB LEDs. [Ole] has a great introduction to driving RGB LED matrices using only five data pins on a microcontroller.

The one thing that is most often forgotten in a project involving gigantic matrices of RGB LEDs is how to mount them. The enclosure for these LEDs should probably be light and non-conductive. If you’re really clever, each individual LED should be in a light-proof box with a translucent cover on it. [Ole] isn’t doing that here; this matrix is just a bit of wood with some WS2812s glued down to it.

To drive the LEDs, [Ole] is using an Arduino. Even though the WS2812s are individually addressable and only one data pin is needed, [Ole] is using five individual data lines for this matrix. It works okay, and the entire setup can be changed at some point in the future. It’s still a great introduction to individually addressable LED matrices.

If you’d like to see what can be done with a whole bunch of individually addressable LEDs, here’s the FLED that will probably be at our LA meetup in two weeks. There are some crazy engineering challenges and several pounds of solder in the FLED. For the writeup on that, here you go.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, led hacks
apr
24

Arduino Bike Speedometer

arduino, speed, speedometer Commenti disabilitati 

FTAIXO8H3NN9MP6.MEDIUM

by amandaghassaei instructables.com:

Monitor your road speed using the Arduino. This project uses a magnetic switch (also called a reed switch) to measure the speed of one of the bike’s wheels. The Arduino calculates the mph, and send this information out to the LCD screen on the handlebars as you ride. It is compatible with any kind of bike/wheel, simply enter the radius of the wheel in the firmware to calibrate the device for your setup.

Arduino Bike Speedometer – [Link]

Hourly_Builds_post

The Arduino IDE is a collection of modules written in different programming languages and available for three operating systems: Windows, Mac OSX and GNU/Linux.

Every time you download the Arduino IDE, you are actually downloading the result of a careful packaging process, intended to make the download as small as possible and to give you the easiest possible out-of-the-box user experience.

The process is fully automated and it’s repeated every time we publish a new feature, or we fix a bug you helped us find, or we merge code you contributed.

The resulting IDEs are called Nightly Builds: they contain the latest and greatest (and, possibly, buggiest) from the Arduino IDE.

We started delivering Nightly Builds about two years ago as a way to ease your life in giving us feedback: you don’t need to be a developer to try a Nightly.
You may have read replies to github issues saying something like “Your issue has been fixed. It will be available with the next nightly build“.

But sometimes nightly is just not enough, because you can’t wait to try what we coded following your suggestions or to see your contribution becoming available to everyone.

So welcome Hourly Builds!

By the time we push new code for the Arduino IDE, it will take at most an hour for the build to be ready to be downloaded and tried. This will allow a much more fluent conversation and prompt feedback when solving issues and implementing new features.

UDOO_NEO

Wireless, Credit-Card sized, Android + Linux + Arduino™, Embedded Sensors, starting from $49. What else?

UDOO Neo embodies a new concept: a single board computer suitable for the Post-PC era:

  • Like a Raspberry Pi, you can program it in any language and run a full Linux environment with graphic interfaces.
  • You get all the simplicity of an Arduino-compatible board, thanks to the Cortex-M4 and the Arduino UNO pinout layout, with the possibility of adding most Arduino™ shields, actuators and sensors, both analog and digital.
  • An incredible, smoothly-running Android 4.4.3, it gives you the possibility to build new Android-based smart devices.
  • You get a wireless module: Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n + BT 4.0 (Classic Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low Energy), because we hate cables.
  • 9-axis motion sensors are embedded, to build your perfect drone/robot/3D printers/whatever or create new kinds of interactions with the real world.
  • Open-source hardware: because we love to let you hack things or create new devices from scratch!
  • Starting from $49!

UDOO Neo = Raspberry Pi + Arduino + Wi-Fi + BT 4.0 + Sensors - [Link]

temboo-streaming-screenshot-arduino-sms-2

Our friends at Temboo just introduced a new way to log data from an Arduino Yún to the cloud. Called Streaming, it lets you visually select the sensors attached to your Arduino that you have gathering data, and then stream that data to the cloud IoT platform of your choice.

temboo-streaming-graphic-arduino

Streaming also makes it easy to switch where you’re sending your data once your application is running, without requiring any hardware or software updates. Right now, Streaming works with Microsoft’s Power BI and Google’s BigQuery, but Temboo will be continuing to add more platforms in the future. As with Temboo’s other Arduino programming tools, Streaming lets you generate all the code you need for your application right in your browser, and tailors that code to the parameters that you specify. It makes it much easier to store sensor data from your Arduino in the cloud, and to analyze the datasets that you build.

This video shows you how it works:

temboo-streaming-ide-arduino

iphone-and-bean-side-by-side

The LightBlue Bean is a low energy Bluetooth Arduino microcontroller. Using Bluetooth 4.0, it is programmed wirelessly, runs on a coin cell battery, and is perfect for smartphone controlled projects.

SAN FRANCISCO and MINNEAPOLIS April 20, 2015 Punch Through Design, a hardware and software development firm making it easier to develop Bluetooth Low Energy products, announced that the company?s popular LightBlue Bean has been used to create the winning device at the Bluetooth World Hack Challenge.

LightBlue Bean – Zero wires. Infinite uses - [Link]

[vtol] is quickly becoming our favorite technological artist. Just a few weeks ago he graced us with a Game Boy Camera gun, complete with the classic Game Boy printer. Now, he’s somehow managed to create even lower resolution images with a modified typewriter that produces ASCII art images.

As with everything dealing with typewriters, machine selection is key. [vtol] is using a Brother SX-4000 typewriter for this build, a neat little daisy wheel machine that’s somehow still being made today. The typewriter is controlled by an Arduino Mega that captures an image from a camera, converts it to ASCII art with Pure Data and MAX/MSP, then slowly (and loudly) prints it on a piece of paper one character at a time.

The ASCII art typewriter was recently shown at the 101 Festival where a number of people stood in front of a camera and slowly watched a portrait assemble itself out of individual characters. Check out the video of the exhibit below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

600x400_call4maker

Last year Maker Faire Rome welcomed 600 projects, 200 performances, 90.000 visitors coming from all over the world.  Maker Faire Rome – The European Edition recently announced its third edition scheduled from the 16th to the 18th of October 2015 and will take place at  “La Sapienza” University in Rome, exceptionally “closed” for three days to host this international event.

The Curators of the Faire, Massimo Banzi, co-founder of Arduino and Riccardo Luna, italian Digital Champion, are inviting makers of all kinds and ages to showcase their amazing work and embrace the do-it-yourself (or do-it-together) spirit with a great and appreciative audience.

Are you a Maker, an Innovator, a digital Craftsman? The MakerFaireRome’s Call4Makers is out!

There are many ways to participate:

  • you can exhibit your project: we’ll give you a booth with table and chairs inside the halls, which will be filled with visitors who are curious and interested in meeting you
  • you can give a presentation in public: we’ll give you a room or a stage where you can talk about your project or tell your story or deal with the issues that you want to propose
  • you can hold a workshop: we’ll give you a workshop area where you can do interactive demonstrations and engage participants -adults and / or children- in practical activities
  • you can perform in public: we’ll give you a space or a stage for you to perform in your creative, technological, robotic, musical, pyrotechnic performance…

The proposals regarding the exposure of projects, if accepted, will lead to the allocation of a booth, free of charge. Presence is required at this booth while Maker Faire Rome 2015 is open to the public (three days). It will also be possible to sell products or gadgets.

Accepted projects will be valorized on the MakerFaire Rome website. Besides, Maker Faire Rome press & media team will diffuse info about participants to the newspapers, radio and television stations, which in the past years have devoted a lot of attention to the projects and performers.

We expect creative, innovative, fun, interactive projects, showing the process by which the achievements enrich visitors, communicating passion and ingenuity.

Are you thinking about participanting? In the meanwhile:

  • spread the word! #MFR15
  • help us to involve all the makers you know (and especially those who still do not know they are makers!)
  • subscribe to our newsletter to keep informed about news, events and discounts!

We are looking forward to seeing you all in Rome in October!

Submit your project now! (By May 31)



  • Newsletter

    Sign up for the PlanetArduino Newsletter, which delivers the most popular articles via e-mail to your inbox every week. Just fill in the information below and submit.

  • PlanetArduino is powered by WordPress. Design by Jasone.it. Valid XHTML   •   Valid CSS
    51 queries. 9,473 seconds.