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The renaissance of Nixie tube popularity amid the nostalgia surrounding older tech has made them almost prohibitively expensive for individual projects. Seeing an opportunity to modernize the beloved devices, [Connor Nishijima] has unleashed this new, LED edge-lit display that he has dubbed Lixie.

We featured his prototype a few years ago. That design used dots to make up each character but this upgrade smooths that out with sleek lines and a look one would almost expect from a professional device — or at the very least something you’d see in a cyberpunk near-future. The color-changing Neopixel LEDs — moderated by a cleverly designed filter — allow for customization to your heart’s content, and the laser-cut acrylic panes allow for larger displays to be produced with relative ease.

The image above (and the video below) show two revisions of the most recent Lixie prototypes. There is a huge improvement on the right, as the digits are now outlines instead of single strokes and engraved instead of cut completely through the acrylic. The difference if phenomenal, and in our opinion move the “back to the drawing board” effect to “ready for primetime”. [Connor] and his team are working on just that, with a Tindie preorder in place for the first production-ready digits to roll off their line.

Considering that Nixie Tubes were originally considered too expensive for mass-produced items like clocks, it’s ironic they’re seeing a revival in hobbyist projects for just that purpose. Lixie, then, may fit the purpose for those seeing a cheaper solution without sacrificing on the quality of the result. The design is fully open-source, so get to hacking!

For a suitably cyberpunk application of a Nixie tube, check out this motorcycle speedometer. Oh, and lest you think we’re duplicating ourselves, there was another edge-lit Nixie-alike project featured here just a few weeks ago. Seems good ideas come in waves.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, led hacks

In preparation for Makerfaire, [hwhardsoft] needed to throw together some demos. So they dug deep and produced this unique display.

The display uses two synchronized peristaltic pumps to push water and red paraffin through a tube that switches back over itself in a predictable fashion. As visible in the video after the break, the pumps go at it for a few minutes producing a seemingly random pattern. The pattern coalesces at the end into a short string of text. The text is unfortunately fairly hard to read, even on a contrasting background. Perhaps an application of UV dye could help?

Once the message has been displayed, the water and paraffin drop back into the holding tank as the next message is queued up. The oil and water separate just like expected and a pump at the level of each fluid feeds it back into the system.

We were deeply puzzled at what appeared to be an Arduino mounted on a DIN rail for use in industrial settings, but then discovered that this product is what [hwhardsoft] built the demo to sell. We can see some pretty cool variations on this technique for art displays.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Lug
03

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial

arduino, clock, display, vfd Commenti disabilitati su Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial 

FP770N2IBL0P092.MEDIUM

by Kesselwagen @ instructables.com

Vacuum fluorescent displays look really kinda fancy and cool to me, I really love the blue-breen color. That’s why I decided to write this Instructable about a clock based on this technology. This is my first instructable here, showing you how I have designed built my clock and how you can build yourself exactly the same or a similar clock that utilizes the VFD display. I’m not a native speaker – just for you to know if you’re wondering why some sentences might make no sense at all.

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial – [Link]

Lug
03

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial

arduino, clock, display, vfd Commenti disabilitati su Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial 

FP770N2IBL0P092.MEDIUM

by Kesselwagen @ instructables.com

Vacuum fluorescent displays look really kinda fancy and cool to me, I really love the blue-breen color. That’s why I decided to write this Instructable about a clock based on this technology. This is my first instructable here, showing you how I have designed built my clock and how you can build yourself exactly the same or a similar clock that utilizes the VFD display. I’m not a native speaker – just for you to know if you’re wondering why some sentences might make no sense at all.

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial – [Link]

Mag
16

Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display

arduino, display, gauge, OLED, vacuum Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display 

4pBaMEP

Initial testing. Ignore the humidity sensor, that was for something else.
The vacuum gauge outputs 0-10VDC. This had to be changed to a 0-5VDC range using a potential divider so it was compatible with the Arduino. Initial build used a 10k pot in place of a vacuum gauge to make it simpler.

Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display – [Link]

Mag
07

Arduino measures heart beat rate from fingertip

arduino, display, Heart Rate, LED, SPI Commenti disabilitati su Arduino measures heart beat rate from fingertip 

PulseMeter1Title

In this article Raj over embedded-lab.com shows us how to measure our heart rate using Arduino UNO, his Easy Pulse Plugin and 4-digit SPI seven segment LED display module. It computes the heart rate by processing the analog pulse signal output from the Easy Pulse Plugin sensor and displays it on the seven segment display module.

Arduino measures heart beat rate from fingertip – [Link]

Apr
30

A Simple And Inexpensive GPS Navigation Device

arduino, arduino hacks, bitmap, BMP, display, geotiff, Github, gps, LCD, navigation, TFT, uno Commenti disabilitati su A Simple And Inexpensive GPS Navigation Device 

There are plenty of GPS navigation units on the market today, but it’s always fun to build something yourself. That’s what [middelbeek] did with his $25 GPS device. He managed to find a few good deals on electronics components online, including and Arduino Uno, a GPS module, and a TFT display.

In order to get the map images on the device, [middelbeek] has to go through a manual process. First he has to download a GEOTIFF of the area he wants mapped. A GEOTIFF is a metadata standard that allows georeferencing information to be embedded into a TIFF image file.  [middelbeek] then has to convert the GEOTIFF into an 8-bit BMP image file. The BMP images get stored on an SD card along with a .dat file that describes the boundaries of each BMP. The .dat file was also manually created.

The Arduino loads this data and displays the correct map onto the 320×240 TFT display. [middelbeek] explains on his github page that he is currently unable to display data from two map files at once, which can lead to problems when the position moves to the edge of the map. We suspect that with some more work and tuning this system could be improved and made easier to use, of course for under $25 you can’t expect too much.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Gen
21

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial

5110 LCD, arduino, display, LCD, Nokia 5110 LCD Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial 

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial #2 – Load Graphics on the display

In this tutorial we are going to learn how to load our custom made graphics into a Nokia 5110 lcd display.

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial - [Link]

Dic
11

Digital Code Lock using Arduino with LCD Display

arduino, code lock, display, LCD, lock Commenti disabilitati su Digital Code Lock using Arduino with LCD Display 

code-lock-using-arduino

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

We have published a digital code lock using arduino some weeks before. This one is a little different. The earlier version was based on a defined password, where the user can not change it. Moreover there was no LCD display interfaced with the project to output lock status. This project is a much improved version of the same digital code lock which comes with a user defined password and LCD display. The user will be prompted to set a password at installation. This password inputted at installation will continue to serve the lock until it is changed. The user can change the current password with a single key press. The program will check for current password and allows the user to change password only if the the current password is input correctly.

Digital Code Lock using Arduino with LCD Display - [Link]

Nov
27

DS3231 OLED clock with 2-button menu setting and temperature display

arduino, clock, display, DS3231, LCD, OLED, RTC, temperature Commenti disabilitati su DS3231 OLED clock with 2-button menu setting and temperature display 

FLNQVLCI2TR1IVC.MEDIUM

by df99 @ instructables.com:

This is an OLED clock I built using an Arduino Micro, a tiny OLED 128×64 display using the SSD1306 controller and I2C interface, and a precision DS3231-based real-time clock module with rechargeable battery backup. It features a menu system for setting the RTC (no serial port or USB required)

DS3231 OLED clock with 2-button menu setting and temperature display - [Link]



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