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This is a quick start guide for the Four Digit Seven Segment Display Module and Enclosure from PMD Way. This module offers a neat and bright display which is ideal for numeric or hexadecimal data. It can display the digits 0 to 9 including the decimal point, and the letters A to F. You can also control each segment individually if desired. 

Each module contains four 74HC595 shift registers – once of each controls a digit. If you carefully remove the back panel from the enclosure, you can see the pin connections:

four-digit-seven-segment-display-with-enclosure-from-pmdway

If you’re only using one display, use the group of pins at the centre-bottom of the board. From left to right the connections are:

  1. Data out (ignore for single display use)
  2. VCC – connect to a 3.3V or 5V supply
  3. GND – connect to your GND line
  4. SDI – data in – connect to the data out pin on your Arduino/other board
  5. LCK – latch – connect to the output pin on your Arduino or other board that will control the latch
  6. CLK – clock – connect to the output pin on your Arduino or other board that will control the clock signal

For the purposes of our Arduino tutorial, connect VCC to the 5V pin, GND to GND, SDI to D11, LCK to D13 and CLK to D12. 

If you are connecting more than one module, use the pins on the left- and right-hand side of the module. Start with the connections from your Arduino (etc) to the right-hand side, as this is where the DIN (data in) pin is located.

Then connect the pins on the left-hand side of the module to the right-hand side of the new module – and so forth. SDO (data out) will connect to the SDI (data in) – with the other pins being identical for connection. 

The module schematic is shown below:

four-digit-seven-segment-display-with-enclosure-from-pmdway

Arduino Example Sketch

Once you have made the connections to your Arduino as outlined above, upload the following sketch:

// Demonstration Arduino sketch for four digit, seven segment display with enclosure
// https://pmdway.com/collections/7-segment-numeric-leds/products/four-digit-seven-segment-display-module-and-enclosure
int latchPin = 13; // connect to LCK pin intclockPin = 12; // connect to CLK pin intdataPin = 11; // connect to SDI pin int LED_SEG_TAB[]={ 0xfc,0x60,0xda,0xf2,0x66,0xb6,0xbe,0xe0,0xfe,0xf6,0x01,0xee,0x3e,0x1a,0x7a,0x9e,0x8e,0x01,0x00}; //0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 dp . a b c d e f off void setup() { //set pins to output so you can control the shift register pinMode(latchPin, OUTPUT); pinMode(clockPin, OUTPUT); pinMode(dataPin, OUTPUT); } void displayNumber(int value, boolean leadingZero) // break down "value" into digits and store in a,b,c,d { int a,b,c,d; a = value / 1000; value = value % 1000; b = value / 100; value = value % 100; c = value / 10; value = value % 10; d = value; if (leadingZero==false) // removing leading zeros { if (a==0 && b>0) { a = 18; } if (a==0 && b==0 && c>0) { a = 18; b = 18; } if (a==0 && b==0 && c==0) { a = 18; b = 18; c = 18; } if (a==0 && b==0 && c==0 && d==0) { a = 18; b = 18; c = 18; d = 18; } } digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[d]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[c]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[b]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[a]); digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH); } void allOff() // turns off all segments { digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0); digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH); } void loop() { for (int z=900; z<=1100; z++) { displayNumber(z, false); delay(10); } delay(1000); for (int z=120; z>=0; --z) { displayNumber(z, true); delay(10); } delay(1000); digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[14]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[13]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[12]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[11]); digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH); delay(1000); digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[16]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[15]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[14]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[13]); digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH); delay(1000); digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[0]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[1]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[2]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[3]+1); digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH); delay(1000); digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[7]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[6]+1); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[5]); shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[4]); digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH); delay(1000); }

After a moment you should see the display spring into action in the same way as in the demonstration video:

How does it work? 

First we define which digital output pins are used for latch, clock and data on lines four to six. On line eight we have created an array which contains values that are sent to the shift registers in the module to display the possible digits and letters. For example, the first – 0xfc – will activate the segments to display a zero, 0x7a for the letter C, and so on. 

From line 20 we’ve created a custom function that is used to send a whole number between zero and 9999 to the display. To do so, simply use:

void displayNumber(value, true/false);

where value is the number to display (or variable containing the number) – and the second parameter of true or false. This controls whether you have a leading zero displayed – true for yes, false for no. 

For example, to display “0123” you would use:

displayNumber(123, true);

… which results with:

four-digit-seven-segment-display-with-enclosure-from-pmdway-0123

or to display “500” you would use:

displayNumber(500, false);

… which results with:

four-digit-seven-segment-display-with-enclosure-from-pmdway-500

To turn off all the digits, you need to send zeros to every bit in the shift register, and this is accomplished with the function in the sketch called 

allOff();

What about the decimal point? 

To turn on the decimal point for a particular digit, add 1 to the value being sent to a particular digit. Using the code from the demonstration sketch to display 87.65 you would use:

 digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW);

 shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[5]);

 shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[6]);

 shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[7]+1); // added one for decimal point

 shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, LED_SEG_TAB[8]);

 digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH);

… which results with:

four-digit-seven-segment-display-with-enclosure-from-pmdway-87p65

In-depth explanation of how the module is controlled

As shown in the schematic above, each digit is controlled by a 74HC595 shift register. Each shift register has eight digital outputs, each of which control an individual segment of each digit. So by sending four bytes of data (one byte = eight bits) you can control each segment of the display. 

Each digit’s segments are mapped as follows:

7segmentdisplaymap

And the outputs from each shift register match the order of segments from left to right. So outputs 0~7 match A~G then decimal point. 

For example, to create the number seven with a decimal point, you need to turn on segments A, B, C and DP – which match to the shift register’s outputs 0,1,2,8. 

Thus the byte to send to the shift register would be 0b11100001 (or 225 in decimal or 0xE1 in hexadecimal). 

Every time you want to change the display you need to re-draw all four (or more if more than one module is connected) digits – so four bytes of data are sent for each display change. The digits are addressed from right to left, so the first byte send is for the last digit – and the last byte is for the first digit. 

There are three stages of updating the display. 

  1. Set the LCK (latch) line low
  2. Shift out four bytes of data from your microcontroller
  3. Set the LCK (latch) line high

For example, using Arduino code we use:

  digitalWrite(latchPin, LOW);

  shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0b10000000); // digit 4

  shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0b01000000); // digit 3

  shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0b00100000); // digit 2

  shiftOut(dataPin, clockPin, LSBFIRST, 0b00010001); // digit 1

  digitalWrite(latchPin, HIGH);

This would result with the following:

4digit7segmentdisplaymoduletronixlabsbits

Note how the bytes in binary match the map of the digits and their position. For example, the first byte sent was for the fourth digit, and the segment A was turned on. And that’s all there is to it – a neat and simple display. 

This post brought to you by pmdway.com – everything for makers and electronics enthusiasts, with free delivery worldwide.

To keep up to date with new posts at tronixstuff.com, please subscribe to the mailing list in the box on the right, or follow us on twitter @tronixstuff.

 

[Mike Clifford] of [Modustrial Maker] had not one, not two, but five friends call him to announce that their first children were on the way, and he was inspired to build them a Bluetooth speaker with a unique LED matrix display as a fitting gift. Meant to not only entertain guests, but to audio-visually stimulate each of their children to promote neurological development.

Picking up and planing down rough maple planks, [Clifford] built a mitered box to house the components before applying wood finish. The brain inside the box is an Arduino Mega — or a suitable clone — controlling a Dayton Bluetooth audio and 2x15W amp board. In addition to the 19.7V power supply, there’s a step down converter for the Mega, and a mic to make the LED matrix sound-reactive. The LED matrix is on a moveable baffle to adjust the distance between it and a semi-transparent acrylic light diffuser. This shifts the light between sharp points or a softer, blended look — perfect for the scrolling Matrix text and fireplace effects! Check it out!

[Clifford]’s Arduino code is up on GitHub for anyone else out there with friends who are expecting. You never know when your own childhood Fisher-Price cassette players from back in the day might come in handy.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Musical Hacks

[Robin Reiter] needed a better way to show off his work. He previously converted an electric TV stand into a full 360-degree display turntable, but it relied on an external power supply to get it spinning. It was time to give it an upgrade.

Putting his spacial organization skills to work, [Reiter] has crammed a mini OLED display, rotary encoder, a LiPo 18650 battery and charging circuit, a pair of buck converters, a power switch, and an Arduino pro mini into the small control console. To further maximize space, [Reiter] stripped out the pin headers and wired the components together directly. It attaches to the turntable in question with magnets, so it can be removed out of frame, or for displaying larger objects!

When first powered on, the turntable holds in pause mode giving [Reiter] time to adjust the speed and direction. He also took the time to add an optical rotary encoder disk to the turntable and give the gearing a much needed cleaning. Check out the project video after the break!

[Reiter] is looking to add a timed stop feature, and — taking advantage of that rotary encoder — a rotate to target angle option, but it performs admirably at present.

We can see this display coming in handy for any 3D scanning needs too!


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Arduino Hacks

There’s building small computers — like the Raspberry Pi — and then there’s building small computers — like this Desktop Viewer from Star Trek.

[Monta Elkins] is using a Beetle for this project; it’s an Arduino clone, hosting the ATMega32U4 microcontroller, with a unique feature that allows you to twist connecting wires to secure them to the board. Instead, [Elkins] went with the logical choice of soldering them. For a display, he used a SPI serial OLED 128 x 64 monochrome screen which he has cycling through a number of iconic Star Trek TOS symbols and animations. The images were converted into PROGMEM  — which gets loaded into flash memory — before finally being uploaded to the Beetle.

Following some fine 3D print work in ABS plastic which rendered the Desktop Viewer’s case, [Elkins] used acetone to solvent-weld the pieces together and applied a quick coat of paint to finish it off. This little replica would make a great desktop gadget as it requires a micro-USB to power the device.

While this little display ornaments your workspace, you can further dazzle any visitors with a pneumatic door and your LCARS-inspired home automation system.


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Arduino Hacks

The renaissance of Nixie tube popularity amid the nostalgia surrounding older tech has made them almost prohibitively expensive for individual projects. Seeing an opportunity to modernize the beloved devices, [Connor Nishijima] has unleashed this new, LED edge-lit display that he has dubbed Lixie.

We featured his prototype a few years ago. That design used dots to make up each character but this upgrade smooths that out with sleek lines and a look one would almost expect from a professional device — or at the very least something you’d see in a cyberpunk near-future. The color-changing Neopixel LEDs — moderated by a cleverly designed filter — allow for customization to your heart’s content, and the laser-cut acrylic panes allow for larger displays to be produced with relative ease.

The image above (and the video below) show two revisions of the most recent Lixie prototypes. There is a huge improvement on the right, as the digits are now outlines instead of single strokes and engraved instead of cut completely through the acrylic. The difference if phenomenal, and in our opinion move the “back to the drawing board” effect to “ready for primetime”. [Connor] and his team are working on just that, with a Tindie preorder in place for the first production-ready digits to roll off their line.

Considering that Nixie Tubes were originally considered too expensive for mass-produced items like clocks, it’s ironic they’re seeing a revival in hobbyist projects for just that purpose. Lixie, then, may fit the purpose for those seeing a cheaper solution without sacrificing on the quality of the result. The design is fully open-source, so get to hacking!

For a suitably cyberpunk application of a Nixie tube, check out this motorcycle speedometer. Oh, and lest you think we’re duplicating ourselves, there was another edge-lit Nixie-alike project featured here just a few weeks ago. Seems good ideas come in waves.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, led hacks

In preparation for Makerfaire, [hwhardsoft] needed to throw together some demos. So they dug deep and produced this unique display.

The display uses two synchronized peristaltic pumps to push water and red paraffin through a tube that switches back over itself in a predictable fashion. As visible in the video after the break, the pumps go at it for a few minutes producing a seemingly random pattern. The pattern coalesces at the end into a short string of text. The text is unfortunately fairly hard to read, even on a contrasting background. Perhaps an application of UV dye could help?

Once the message has been displayed, the water and paraffin drop back into the holding tank as the next message is queued up. The oil and water separate just like expected and a pump at the level of each fluid feeds it back into the system.

We were deeply puzzled at what appeared to be an Arduino mounted on a DIN rail for use in industrial settings, but then discovered that this product is what [hwhardsoft] built the demo to sell. We can see some pretty cool variations on this technique for art displays.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Lug
03

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial

arduino, clock, display, vfd Commenti disabilitati su Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial 

FP770N2IBL0P092.MEDIUM

by Kesselwagen @ instructables.com

Vacuum fluorescent displays look really kinda fancy and cool to me, I really love the blue-breen color. That’s why I decided to write this Instructable about a clock based on this technology. This is my first instructable here, showing you how I have designed built my clock and how you can build yourself exactly the same or a similar clock that utilizes the VFD display. I’m not a native speaker – just for you to know if you’re wondering why some sentences might make no sense at all.

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial – [Link]

Lug
03

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial

arduino, clock, display, vfd Commenti disabilitati su Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial 

FP770N2IBL0P092.MEDIUM

by Kesselwagen @ instructables.com

Vacuum fluorescent displays look really kinda fancy and cool to me, I really love the blue-breen color. That’s why I decided to write this Instructable about a clock based on this technology. This is my first instructable here, showing you how I have designed built my clock and how you can build yourself exactly the same or a similar clock that utilizes the VFD display. I’m not a native speaker – just for you to know if you’re wondering why some sentences might make no sense at all.

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial – [Link]

Mag
16

Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display

arduino, display, gauge, OLED, vacuum Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display 

4pBaMEP

Initial testing. Ignore the humidity sensor, that was for something else.
The vacuum gauge outputs 0-10VDC. This had to be changed to a 0-5VDC range using a potential divider so it was compatible with the Arduino. Initial build used a 10k pot in place of a vacuum gauge to make it simpler.

Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display – [Link]

Mag
07

Arduino measures heart beat rate from fingertip

arduino, display, Heart Rate, LED, SPI Commenti disabilitati su Arduino measures heart beat rate from fingertip 

PulseMeter1Title

In this article Raj over embedded-lab.com shows us how to measure our heart rate using Arduino UNO, his Easy Pulse Plugin and 4-digit SPI seven segment LED display module. It computes the heart rate by processing the analog pulse signal output from the Easy Pulse Plugin sensor and displays it on the seven segment display module.

Arduino measures heart beat rate from fingertip – [Link]



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