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Kaleb Clark really enjoys flight simulators, but when attempting to fly a helicopter, a normal keyboard or even a joystick isn’t quite optimal for controlling its vertical movement. Real helicopters use a lever assembly called a collective to adjust downward thrust, and he decided to build his own with an Arduino Micro and GPIO expander.

To read the main lever action, he’s using a gear and encoder setup, which allows him to lift and descent in a much more natural way than afforded normal computer controls. There’s also has a bunch of buttons attached that can be programmed for various actions as needed. 

Game interface is taken care of by the Micro’s ATmega32U4 chip, giving it HID functionality as an auxiliary input device.

After picking up a free arcade machine, YouTuber “Another Maker” has naturally been considering what to do with it. One of the more interesting components included is the 1/5/10/20 U.S. dollar bill acceptor, which he outlines in the video below.

The cash reader is powered by a 12V supply, and “emulates” quarter inputs to the machine by sending multiple signals for each bill. Meaning, a dollar would be output as four quarters, five times that for a five dollar bill, and so on. This functionality is shown at the end of the clip on an Arduino Mega with an LCD keypad shield. The machine also has a 5V input, which can activated by an Arduino to make it flash LEDs and reject all bills when “business is closed.”

The code that enables it to read the device can be found on GitHub. And in case you’re wondering what Another Maker ended up building…

Combating COVID-19 Conference: A Collaborative Arduino Community Initiative will take place today, April 2nd starting at 5pm CEST.

The online event will be streamed via Zoom. From 5:00 to 5:30pm, there will be only one streaming channel (LINK HERE). After that, we’ll break out into two different rooms (LINK TO ZOOM ROOM 1, LINK TO ZOOM ROOM 2).

There are different ways to participate: presenting an Arduino-based solution to tackle COVID-19 (the call for projects is now closed), supporting other community projects, providing expert advice, or asking the Arduino team for some support.

This conference schedule is as follows:

5:00 – 5:30pm CEST – Plenary Introductory Session – LINK TO ZOOM ROOM 1

  • David Cuartielles, “The Arduino Community Response to the COVID-19 Outbreak.”
  • Robert Read (https://www.pubinv.org/), “Open Source Hardware for the Emergency”

5:30 – 7:00pm CEST – Session 1: Arduino-Based Ventilators and Medical Devices

7:00 – 8:30pm CEST – Session 2: Legal and Technological Challenges

There are different channels to join the discussion with the Arduino team and community:


Giovanni Carrera has created a capable power monitor, dubbed the ArduINA226, using an Arduino Nano and an INA226 IC. 

This chip measures the current and voltage, and calculates power, which is then read by the Arduino board and sent to an LCD display. The unit also features a micro SD card for storage and later analysis, letting you track stats such as energy consumption over time.

Nearly any sort of Arduino board can be used for this setup, but the Nano was chosen as it makes things nice and compact and has an included USB adapter. The electronics are mounted on a PCB and housed in a professional-looking enclosure. 

A full schematic for the ArduINA226 is available in Carrera’s project write-up, along with code if you’d like to make your own.

With the current coronavirus situation, we’ve been encouraged to wash our hands regularly for 20 seconds – or approximately how long it takes you to hum “Happy Birthday” from beginning to end twice. That sounds easy enough, but do you really do this every time? What you need is some sort of automatic timer, perhaps with a dial gauge for easy visual reference. 

As it just so happens, Gautam Bose and Lucas Ochoa built such a device with an Arduino Uno. The aptly named Wash-A-Lot-Bot detects a person’s hands in front of it via an ultrasonic sensor, then ticks a dial timer from 0 to 20 (or rather 20 to DONE!) using a micro servo. 

This simple setup can be made with little more than scissors and tape, making it a great way to learn about Arduino and programming while you’re stuck indoors.

What does one do with over 1,000 LEDs, white acrylic, and 288 IR sensors? If you’re Redditor “jordy_essen,” you create an interactive light panel.

In one mode, the user pull a reflective tool across the sensors to draw a paths, with potentiometers implemented to select the color. It can also be set up to play a sort of whack-a-mole game, where one has to activate the sensor in the same area where it illuminates.

For this amazing device, jordy_essen uses not one, or even two, but six Arduino Mega boards to drive the LEDs directly — in turn controlled by a webpage running on a Raspberry Pi. If that wasn’t enough hardware, an Uno is tasked with taking inputs from the color potentiometers. 

It’s a brilliant project in any sense of the word!

For the latest update regarding Arduino’s response to the Covid-19 outbreak please click here.

Priority Service for the Design & Production of Essential Medical and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

As companies around the globe rapidly react to governments’ calls to produce critical medical equipment like ventilators and PPE, Arduino is prioritizing stock allocation for these urgent needs.

If your company urgently requires any Arduino hardware or software to facilitate the prototyping and production of any equipment or solution to lessen the impact of Covid-19 please contact us.

A dedicated team will work to ensure we support your needs through ensuring the fastest possible delivery (either directly or via sub-distribution) and/or expediting production as required. We will also provide increased levels of design support and help for those designing such critical equipment. 

We’re just hours away from (virtually) celebrating Arduino Day! Join us on Saturday for our official livestream, starting at 2pm CET. We’ll connect with community events from all around the world as well as hear from Arduino team members like Fabio Violante, Massimo Banzi, and David Cuartielles.

Be sure to set a reminder and tune in!

To help individuals work remotely and share their designs with team members, we’re providing a free three-month upgrade to the Arduino Create Maker plan to all 1.4 million users of Create as well as new subscribers to the service. With Arduino Create everything is ready to go; there is no need to install libraries and you can quickly share your sketch with teammates via just a URL. 

To gain your free three-month upgrade* all you need to do is go to Arduino Create choose the “Maker” plan with the default monthly option and enter the voucher code “CREATE4FREE” during the purchase process.

Arduino Create enables users to write code, access content, configure boards and share projects. Features such as an always up-to-date online IDE and the ability to share builds and receive feedback from other facilities means you can work from home efficiently and effectively. If you don’t want to start a project from scratch there’s always the option to tap into the power of the community on the Arduino Project Hub by browsing projects and making them your own. 

The ‘Maker’ plan comes with the added benefits of up to 250 sketches allowed in your sketchbook along with 200MB space to store those sketches and libraries. You can manage more connected objects (five ‘things’) with up to 20 properties per ‘thing,’ enabling the development of complete IoT solutions. Automating processes remotely is further enabled by the Maker plan including access to set up and remotely control 5 of each cloud enabled Arduino board, three cloud-enabled Linux devices, and one cloud-enabled generic third-party board.

Find out more details about Arduino Create and all the features included in the Maker plan here.

*The ‘free 3-month upgrade to Create Maker is applicable to the monthly plan and is limited to new subscribers only. Voucher code “CREATE4FREE” expires June 30th, 2020. 

Please note the first monthly payment will start three months after you purchase the plan, and you are able to cancel your subscription at any time.

Researchers from the University of Auckland in New Zealand’s are exploring a new way to construct interactive touch surfaces using finger-mounted audio transducers. 

VersaTouch — which works on everyday surfaces — uses one or more receivers to measure sound waves emanating from the wearer’s “augmented” fingers, allowing it to calculate their positions and/or movements. The plug-and-play system can also sense force based on a changing audio signature and track individual digits by alternating each one’s sonic outputs. 

Importantly, VersaTouch can be configured without permanent modification to the newly interactive surface. The setup includes an Arduino Due to receive signals, a Teensy 3.6 to control the transducers, and a MacBook to process the data and calculate the touch positions with a Java program.

More information on the project can be found in the team’s research paper, and you can see it demonstrated in the video below. 

VersaTouch is a portable, plug-and-play system that uses active acoustic sensing to track fine-grained touch locations as well as touch force of multiple fingers on everyday surfaces without having to permanently instrument them or do an extensive calibration. Our system is versatile in multiple aspects. First, with simple calibration, VersaTouch can be arranged in arbitrary layouts in order to fit into crowded surfaces while retaining its accuracy. Second, various modalities of touch input, such as distance and position, can be supported depending on the number of sensors used to suit the interaction scenario. Third, VersaTouch can sense multi-finger touch, touch force, as well as identify the touch source. Last, VersaTouch is capable of providing vibrotactile feedback to fingertips through the same actuators used for touch sensing.



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