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18

Nokia 5110 graphics tutorial

arduino, LCD, nokia, Nokia 5110 Commenti disabilitati su Nokia 5110 graphics tutorial

FRYI55QI9SBRB4E.MEDIUM

by samuel123abc @ instructables.com:

Okay, here’s the deal. There are some tutorials on youtube showing how to get graphics to show on the nokia 5110 and that’s great. If you just want a simple way to do that, go and watch them instead but there are a few problems I see,

1. There are none for mac. I am using a mac and everyone in the videos are using a windows.

2. Sometimes I just wanna go to the computer and search up how to make some graphics. When searching “Nokia 5110 graphics” on google, I found nothing but some libraries and some text.

In this tutorial I will show you how to connect the display, use the code and use some web-based and downloaded tools to create some awesome graphics YOU can customize however you want. Now, enough of me speaking, let’s just begin.

Nokia 5110 graphics tutorial – [Link]

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16

Arduino Announces Manufacturing Partnership with Adafruit

Announcements, arduino, Featured, GEMMA, Made in Usa, manufacturing, Partnership Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Announces Manufacturing Partnership with Adafruit

ArduinoAdafruit
Today, May 16th, 2015 Massimo Banzi, CEO and co-founder of Arduino, announced at Maker Faire during the “State of Arduino” keynote that Adafruit is manufacturing Arduino’s for Arduino.cc in New York, New York, USA! 

Limor “Ladyada” Fried said:

“Adafruit and Arduino.cc have been working together on open-source software and hardware for almost 10 years in a variety of ways, this is expanded partnership and manufacturing is part of our collective goal to make the world a better place through the sharing of ideas, code and hardware with our communities –

We’re currently manufacturing the Arduino  Gemma with Arduino.cc right here in New York City at the Adafruit factory, it instantly became a top seller and we’re looking forward to bringing our manufacturing expertise and processes to start shipping Arduinos right here from the USA as soon as possible!”

Take a look at this video interview of Massimo by Make directly from Maker Faire Bay Area and containing other important announcements:

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16

Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display

arduino, display, gauge, OLED, vacuum Commenti disabilitati su Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display

4pBaMEP

Initial testing. Ignore the humidity sensor, that was for something else.
The vacuum gauge outputs 0-10VDC. This had to be changed to a 0-5VDC range using a potential divider so it was compatible with the Arduino. Initial build used a 10k pot in place of a vacuum gauge to make it simpler.

Arduino Vacuum Gauge Display – [Link]

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16

Affordable Opensource Arduino Laser Engraver for Everbody

arduino, engraver, laser, ZelosLaser Commenti disabilitati su Affordable Opensource Arduino Laser Engraver for Everbody

blog-aufmacher

The ZelosLaser Engraver is affordable, with a compact design and the perfect entry for the Daily Hobbyist.

What are the characteristics of the ZelosLaser Engraver?

  • Work area *Normal* 300mm x 200mm
  • Housing dimensions Normal 440mm x 350mm x 220mm
  • Work area *BIG MAMA* 660mm x 650mm
  • Housing dimensions *BIG MAMA* 800mm x 800mm x 220mm

Affordable Opensource Arduino Laser Engraver for Everbody – [Link]

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15

Celebrate with us a decade of Making at Maker Faire Bay Area

Arduino Gemma, atmel, bay area, Booth, Featured, Maker Faire, MakerFaire Commenti disabilitati su Celebrate with us a decade of Making at Maker Faire Bay Area

MF15_Flier_0215

The Maker Faire Bay Area is celebrating 10 years of making! The weekend is starting  and we’ll be there celebrating t0o. We invite makers, artists, designers, teachers, educators and passionate DIYers to visit our team at the Arduino booth (#2223) right next to Atmel! We’ll be showcasing cool demos of Arduino Create, Arduino Materia 101, Arduino at Heart Primo and you’ll be able to have a close look to some of the new boards like Arduino Gemma.

On Saturday at 12:30PM  Massimo Banzi will be on the Center Stage for his traditional keynote on the State of Arduino. You are welcome to attend and learn about the latest developments in Arduino open-source microcontroller ecosystem.

If you are coming with kids, don’t miss Teach Physical computing to kids workshop, with sessions running the whole weekend!

IMG_5821-red

 

 

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15

Fixing A Product Design Flaw In A Misting System

arduino hacks, arduino nano, Humidity, lizard, microcontrollers, mist, misting system, reptile, terrarium Commenti disabilitati su Fixing A Product Design Flaw In A Misting System

[Xerxes3rd] works at a place where they raise reptiles in terrariums. Such enclosures require controlled lighting, temperature and humidity. Humidity is maintained using “misting” devices. These are usually water containers with a pump whose outlet ends in a series of very fine spray nozzles which create the mist. A timer controls the pump’s on and off cycles.

[Xerxes3rd] purchased an Exo Terra Monsoon RS400 misting system – a low-cost misting device and soon discovered that it had a serious design flaw. The built-in timer malfunctions, and it mists a hundred times more than it should! A lot of folks who buy a product and discover it has an inherent design flaw will return it back for a refund. Instead,  [Xerxes3rd] decided to break in and fix it instead –  “warranty void if tampered” be damned.

To start with, he needed to figure out what the problem was. He went about it in clinical fashion, eventually creating a slick document (PDF) outlining his observations and diagnosis. The timer controller board has a PIC micro, some buttons, potentiometers, LED’s and an IR receiver. The misting cycles are set using the two potentiometers – Off time and On time for the pump. His analysis and resolution makes for interesting reading.

What he found was that the PIC micro was reading inconsistent values from the potentiometers. More specifically, the software isn’t doing any smoothing on the analog values it reads from the potentiometers. Since the PIC that controls the system wasn’t easily re-programmable, he opted to replace it with an Arduino Nano. At the same time, he got rid of the potentiometers that were used to set the misting frequency and duration, and added a 16×2 LCD. Time setting is now done using the three on board buttons. He removed the PIC micro and replaced it with two female header sockets, onto which he plugged a small board containing an Arduino Nano and a few components. He also cut the original PCB in half, removing the potentiometers and crystal oscillator in order to make room for the 16×2 character LCD.

The lizards are now probably thanking him for their perfectly timed doses of moisture. Having done this, he could probably add in more features such as a temperature-humidity sensor, a water level sensor or maybe even throw in an ESP8266 module and have the Lizards tweet when they need to be hydrated. Because that’s another thing hackers love – feature creep.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Microcontrollers
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14

Vacuum Gauge Display; Arduino Replaces Industrial

3D Printer, arduino, arduino hacks, industrial, industry, rj45, vacuum Commenti disabilitati su Vacuum Gauge Display; Arduino Replaces Industrial

Arduinos! They’re a great tool that make the world of microcontrollers pretty easy, and in [cptlolalot]’s case, they also give us an alternative to buying expensive, proprietary parts. [cptlolalot] needed a gauge for an expensive vacuum pump, and rather than buying an expensive part, built a circuit around an Arduino to monitor the vacuum.

pressure-gauge-thumbThis project goes a little beyond simple Arduino programming though. A 12V to 5V power supply drives the device, which is laid out on a blank PCB. The display fits snugly over the circuit which reduces the footprint of the project, and the entire thing is housed in a custom-printed case with a custom-printed pushbutton. The device gets power and data over the RJ45 connection so no external power is needed. If you want to take a look at the code, it’s linked on [cptlolalot]’s reddit thread.

This project shows how much easier it can be to grab an Arduino off the shelf to solve a problem that would otherwise be very expensive. We’ve been seeing Arduinos in industrial applications at an increasing rate as well, which is promising not just because it’s cheap but because it’s a familiar platform that will make repairs and hacks in the future much easier for everyone.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
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13

Casa Jasmina and Bruce Sterling at Thingscon 2015

arduino, bruce sterling, CasaJasmina, Featured, iot, privacy, Security, Thingscon Commenti disabilitati su Casa Jasmina and Bruce Sterling at Thingscon 2015

hype

Bruce Sterling went to Thingscon conference with a keynote about Casa Jasmina and then published the following essay.

—————-

This is the third of my Casa Jasmina essays. It’s about the recent “ThingsCon” conference in Berlin, May 2015.

This remarkable event was the second “ThingsCon,” a new gathering which makes itself useful to the European hardware startup scene, especially “connected products” designers and builders from Berlin and London. “ThingsCon” took place in Berlin’s “Culture Brewery,” which is a huge, defunct beer factory, currently re-zoned for theaters, bars, restaurants and design retail.

Anybody who has seen the Garrone Foundry (which houses Toolbox Co-Working, Fab Lab Torino and Casa Jasmina), would surely recognize the “Culture Brewery.” It’s the same European story: the old industrial hulk remade for today’s culture-industry. So we found the ThingsCon venue to be pretty cozy, even though the stairs are of odd sizes, the huge, lofty rooms don’t fit together properly, the events and workshops are on different floors and mysteriously distant from one another, and there was excellent beer everywhere and tiny, crooked bathrooms stuck nowhere in particular. There’s something fun about this steampunk disorganization — if you’ve built a weird open-source Internet-of-Things device out of glued plywood and steel rods, it really fits that atmosphere.

ThingsCon is not a Maker Faire for the general public, and attending it is not cheap. ThingsCon is aimed at designers, developers, engineers, entrepreneurs and similar stakeholder-types from the technology ecosystem. The presentations were full of practical wisdom about commercial tech-product development: scaring up funding money, allocating time and resources, packaging, promotion, marketing, founder exit-strategies, angel investment, the issues common to people who might like to sit down for a serious talk with, say, Intel.

The organizers of ThingsCon are Peter Bihr, Simon Hoher, Emanuel Schwarz, Max Kruger, Sonja Heinen, Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino, Brady Forrest, Louisa Heinrich, and Marcel Schouwenaar. As conference organizers go, they won’t win any prizes for sleek efficiency. However when it comes to the Internet of Things, these activists know plenty. At ThingsCon you can learn a lot in a hurry.

So: now that we understand what ThingsCon is about and who ThingsCon is meant to please, let’s confront some of their native ThingsCon problems, because they have lots of interesting issues.

The guy who delivered the first ThingsCon opening keynote, Warren Ellis, really understands their pains. Warren Ellis is pretty well known as a comic book writer, film scriptwriter and novelist, but he was also in the brain-trust of BERG,the legendary and now-dead London interaction-design firm. Warren Ellis grasps the many thorny difficulties of modern connected-product design.

Ellis delivered a sardonically funny rant, warning designers, engineers and manufacturers about the fierce wrath of genuine consumers. Consumers — (they’re the people who are supposed to buy Internet-of-Things products) — are a fickle and treacherous group. Consumers are never grateful for the hard work of designers and technicians. On the contrary, consumers are suspicious, endlessly demanding of customer support, and they resent most things they buy. The Internet-of-Things is even worse than traditional consumer capitalism, because interactive products don’t just sit there, they are invasive and intimate. People treasure their homes as a safe space in a harsh, competitive world, and they feel emotionally wounded when anything in their house betrays them.

Warren Ellis is an intelligent and erudite man, and he was telling the crowd the truth, but they were all laughing nervously because they can’t really believe what he says. It’s all true, but it’s important to understand this and still have some courage about it. If you invent and manufacture something, and it’s a commercial success and ten million people buy the product, of course your life is going to change. You won’t be a “Maker” alone in a garage any more, you’ll be an Internet multimillionaire with customer-support issues. Warren Ellis is right to urge people to think these things through: you shouldn’t dabble in technology and business unless you’re ready to face the consequences of getting what you want.

Barriers to entry in manufacturing are collapsing, so the old lines between a do-it-yourself Maker and a commercial industrialist are blurring. But this doesn’t solve old problems, it just creates interesting new ones. This was the lesson conveyed by Tina Aspiala. Before ThingsCon 2015, I had never heard of Tina Aspiala. Thanks to ThingsCon, I will pay attention to Tina Aspiala from now on.

Tina, who achieved some success with a product of hers, has become a Kickstarter patroness. Tina Aspiala spends a lot of time on Kickstarter and likes to give people some crowdfunding money just to see what happens. She told the crowd that results were mixed. Kickstarter is a funding platform, but some people on Kickstarter are crooks, they’re Kickstarter embezzlers. Other people want to be honest, but they flee in terror when they realize what the real world expects from real design and manufacturing. Others just have bad luck with their Kickstarter: they really wanted to do the work, but they broke a leg, or Dad died, or there was a divorce… that mishap wouldn’t stop FIAT or General Electric, but it does stop the Kickstarter team because they are few in number, while FIAT and General Electric have thousands of personnel.

Many Kickstarter projects get built, despite the host of problems in shipping, supply chains, material costs and manufacturing — but that doesn’t end the story. The product might be workable, but just not much good. The product might do what is promised, but the thing that the product does is only interesting once or twice, not useful in daily life. It’s a “gonzo product” (in the term created by Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino), because it physically works and it does something, but the thing it does is eccentric and weird, so it has no commercial potential or mass appeal.

Why do we have “gonzo products” nowadays? It’s because (as Tina Aspiala pointed out), cheap electronic components make new combinations easy. Projectors, motors, sensors, cameras, processors and various wireless connectivity chips are all drastically cheaper, so product development becomes like a card game, when any gambler can connect X with Y and add some Z, then hope for a jackpot payoff.

In the case of the Internet of Things, there are many possible inputs — dozens of sensors of all kinds — but very limited outputs, because most IoT gizmos can only do very limited things to get any human attention: they blink, or beep, or vibrate. Blinking, beeping, vibrating things that demand human attention can get pretty annoying. Clearly this is a major IoT problem. Tina Aspiala recommends trying to think this situation through with some design perspective, instead of just hacking more components and attaching them to breadboards with soldering irons. That’s a point of view that makes some sense, though, let’s face it, people are gonna want to do it the easy way.

ThingsCon abounded in talks and workshops, more than I can describe here, but the most interesting thing on offer at Thingscon 2015 was the “IOT Design Manifesto”.  That’s why I’m placing the manifesto here in this post.

iotmanifesto-big
A manifesto is a sign of creative health. It’s not that I agree with the “IoT Design Manifesto” — on the contrary, if everybody agrees with a manifesto, then the manifesto is vapid and useless and hasn’t really said anything. Even a manifesto that’s completely wrong can be useful, because it motivates people to rebel and try something else. This manifesto is pretty good, in my opinion, because it’s kindly in tone and well-mannered, it confronts quite a few of the IoT’s real problems.

Even the first declarations, one and two, “We don’t believe the hype, we design useful things,” singles out the ThingsCon crowd as people who are skeptical and yet also trying to get something done. It’s a good attitude for a young industry. The other declarations are about about participation, security, privacy, data collection, association, personal agency, sustainability and humanity. These are some big, hairy issues which aren’t going to get solved in anybody’s lifetime. However, if you spend your life with the Internet of Things you’re going to be dealing with situations of that kind all the time. So, might as well get used to that prospect now.

The authors of this IoT Manifesto are Andrew Spitz, Ruben van der Vleuten, Marcel Schouwenaar, Harm van Beek, Kevin Verelst, Anner Tiete, Jan Belon, Marcel van Heist and Holly Robbins. Before I went to ThingsCon I’d never heard of any of those people, but they were right to do what they did, and I’ll be watching them with a lot more interest from now on. People tend to grow by the size of their chosen problems. These people have some pretty big problems.

I closed the ThingsCon event by asking the people there to help us with our house.

It’s a bit scary to open the faucet in this way: we don’t know if we’ll get a huge flood, or just a groan in the pipe and some dripping. If we get a lot of interest, Casa Jasmina will be crowded and noisy; if interest is more modest, we’ll try to concentrate on a few core issues. In our Internet-of-Things house, we’ll have to acquire some things, accept some things, build some things and maybe commission some things, too. The project has started deliberately, we have paced ourselves, but as the months pass, Casa Jasmina will slowly become a unique and interesting place, a true place of difference.

I wondered, in starting this project, who would ever really want to stay in such a place, and, having been to ThingsCon, I now have a much better idea about that. ThingsCon had about 300 people attending it — the “new hardware movement” are not a mass movement of millions — but those three hundred people are real people. They are bright and committed, and they really exist. If we understand them as our natural guests and we try to please them, I think we’ll do well.

Bruce Sterling

casajasmina

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13

Arduino IDE Becomes More Open, Less Snarky

arduino, arduino hacks, AVR, board manager, ESP8266, IDE Commenti disabilitati su Arduino IDE Becomes More Open, Less Snarky

Version 1.6.4 of the Arduino IDE has been out for a little while now, and it has a couple of notable changes. To our eyes, the most interesting change makes adding support for non-standard boards and their configurations within the Arduino IDE a lot simpler. We’ll get into details below.

unnamedBut before that, it’s time to bid farewell to the cheeky little popup window that would deliver a warning message when using a board bearing the USB IDs of their former-partner-turned-competitor. We absolutely agree with [Massimo] that the issues between Arduino SRL / Smart Projects and Arduino LLC are well-enough known in the community, and that it’s time for the popup to fade away.

Now on to the meat of this post. The new “Board Manager” functionality makes it significantly easier for other non-Arduino products to be programmed within the Arduino IDE. Adafruit has a tutorial on using the Board Manager functionality with their products, and it basically boils down to “enter the right URL, click on the boards you want, download, restart Arduino, bam!”

The list of unofficially supported third-party boards is still a bit short, but it includes some stellar entries. For instance, Adafruit has provided the files needed for the ESP8266, which recently received the Arduino treatment. This means that you can simply point your IDE at Adafruit’s URL, and it’ll set you up with everything needed to develop for the ESP8266 from within the comfy Arduino IDE.

Another standout, from our perspective, is this link that simplifies programming bare AVR chips from the Arduino IDE. While programming your Arduino code into a simple AVR ATmega168 has always been possible, it’s never been as easy as it is now.

How it Works

Under the hood, the new board manager system is pretty straightforward. Clicking on one of the links leads to a JSON file with any number of board architecture definitions. Each entry provides text descriptions of the target board that are used for generating menu entries in the Arduino IDE’s pulldown menus, and a link to a zip file. This zip file contains everything necessary to adapt the Arduino libraries to the target board or chip.

For instance, with something simple like the bare-AVR modifications, the zip file simply includes the boards.txt and platform.txt files that the Arduino IDE uses to fill in a lot of board-specific parameters like the CPU clock speed, fuse bit settings, and AVRDUDE command options for flashing new code. For something more involved, like porting Arduino to the ESP8266, the zip file additionally includes the ported Arduino core and library functions, as well as the uploader tools that make Arduino work on that target.

It’s a very interesting experiment to open up the Arduino IDE so transparently to third-party devices. It’ll surely win points with both hackers and retailers of *duinos, and we’re guessing it’ll only encourage porting the Arduino libraries to more platforms. Let’s see where the community takes this one. What do you want to see Arduino ported to next?


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
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13

Samsung Announces Their Entry into the Arduino Family

arduino, Artik, Samsung Commenti disabilitati su Samsung Announces Their Entry into the Arduino Family

SamsungARTIK

by Matt Stultz @ makezine.com:

When you think about Samsung, the first products that come to mind are probably phones or televisions, not Maker-focused electronics. Today, with their announcement at Internet of Things World, Samsung has entered the Maker world with their ARTIK platform, an Arduino compatible family of devices targeted towards Internet of Things applications.

Currently there are three ARTIK devices: The ARTIK 1, ARTIK 5, and ARTIK 10. All are multi-core ARM processors with built in Bluetooth Low Energy. The ARTIK 5 and 10 also include Wi-Fi, BT, Zigbee, and Thread wireless connections.

Samsung Announces Their Entry into the Arduino Family – [Link]



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