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nov
07

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor

arduino, ATmega328P, monitor, moteino, temperature Commenti disabilitati su Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor

collage-600x332

Colin over at CuPID Controls writes:

We want to put our remote sense and control modules out into the wild and read and aggregate them as it makes sense.
Our basic system layout is as below. We’ve got multiple wireless nodes that broadcast data periodically, and a controller/aggregator that will log this data, acknowledge receipt, and do something useful with it. Eventually, we may have intermediate powered nodes that serve to mesh the grid out, but for now, our nodes just send data to the controller.
We’re currently using these awesome little RF units, called Moteinos. They are an Arduino clone that can use the standard IDE with their bootloader. They’ve got the ever-so-popular ATMega328P chip that is familiar to anybody working with an Arduino Nano or Uno.

[via]

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor - [Link]

nov
07

Using Router SoCs as WiFi Modules (Yet Again)

arduino hacks, Microcontroller, microcontrollers, uart, USR WIFI232-T, wifi, wireless, wireless hacks Commenti disabilitati su Using Router SoCs as WiFi Modules (Yet Again)

module

8-bit AVRs and 32-bit ARMs do one thing, and one thing well: controlling other electronics and sensors while sipping power. The Internet of Things is upon us and with that comes the need for connecting to WiFi networks. Already, a lot of chips are using repackaged System on Chips to provide an easy way to connect to WiFi, and the USR-WIFI232-T is the latest of the bunch. It’s yet another UART to WiFi bridge, and as [2XOD], it’s pretty easy to connect to an AVR.

The module in question can be had through the usual channels for about $11, shipped straight from China, and the only purpose of this device is to provide a bridge between a serial port and a wireless network. They’re not that powerful, and are only meant for simple tasks,

[2XOD] got his hands on one of these modules and tested them out. They’re actually somewhat interesting, with all the configuration happening over a webpage served from the device. Of course the standard AT commands are available for setting everything up, just like the ESP8266.

With a month of testing, [2XOD] has found this to be a very reliable device, logging temperatures every minute for two weeks. There’s also a breakout board available to make connection easy, and depending on what project you’re building, these could be a reasonable stand-in for some other popular UART -> WiFi chips.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Microcontrollers, wireless hacks
nov
06
e-traces-shoes-2See the big picture when it comes to dance moves with an ingenious piece of wearable electronics by designer Lesia Trubat González called E-Traces.

Read more on MAKE

nov
06

Battery Shield Mounts Underneath The Arduino

arduino, arduino hacks, arduino shield, battery Commenti disabilitati su Battery Shield Mounts Underneath The Arduino

Undershield, DIY Arduino Battery Shield

So, what do you do when your Arduino project needs to operate in a remote area or as a portable device? There are LiPo battery shields available, and although they may work well, recharging requires access to a USB port. You can also go the 9v battery route plugged into the on-board regulator of the Arduino but the low mAh rating of a 9v won’t allow your project to stay running for very long. [AI] needed a quick-change battery option for his Arduino project and came up with what he is calling the AA Undershield.

As the name implies, AA sized batteries are used in the project, two of them actually. Yes, two AA batteries at 1.5v each would equal only 3 volts when connected in series. The Arduino needs 5v so [AI] decided to use a MAX756 DC-to-DC step-up regulator to maintain a steady stream of 5v. This article has some nice graphs showing the difference in performance between a 9v battery being stepped down to 5v verses two AA’s being bumped up to 5v.

The ‘under’ in Undershield comes from this shield being mounted underneath the Arduino, unlike every other shield on the planet. Doing so allows use of a standard 0.100″-spaced prototype PCB and is an easy DIY solution to that odd-sized space between the Arduino’s Digital 7 and 8 pins. The Arduino mounts to the Undershield via its normal mounting holes with the help of some aluminum stand offs.

[AI] did a great job documenting his build with schematics and lots of photos so that anyone that is interested in making one for themselves can do so with extreme ease.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
nov
06

Capacitive Sensor Design

arduino, capacitive, Sensor Commenti disabilitati su Capacitive Sensor Design

FMFOE1OI236UGEL.MEDIUM

by ohneschuh @ instructables.com:

Capacitive sensors are an elegant way to control an Arduino using the Capacitive Sensing Library. But the sensitivity and error tolerance depend strongly on the hardware (sensor) design. I found a design guideline here and tested different setups which mostly work well if the Arduino was powered by battery. But the sensor signal changes dramatically if I connect the Arduino to a power supply.

Actually I found a design for five (and more) sensors which works well powered with battery and power supply.

Capacitive Sensor Design - [Link]

nov
06

Multi-tasking the Arduino

arduino, multitasking Commenti disabilitati su Multi-tasking the Arduino

microcontrollers_IMG_5471

Make your Arduino walk and chew gum at the same time.

Once you have mastered the basic blinking leds, simple sensors and sweeping servos, it’s time to move on to bigger and better projects. That usually involves combining bits and pieces of simpler sketches and trying to make them work together. The first thing you will discover is that some of those sketches that ran perfectly by themselves, just don’t play well with others.

The Arduino is a very simple processor with no operating system and can only run one program at a time. Unlike your personal computer or a Raspberry Pi, the Arduino has no way to load and run multiple programs.

That doesn’t mean that we can’t manage multiple tasks on an Arduino. We just need to use a different approach. Since there is no operating system to help us out, We have to take matters into our own hands.

Multi-tasking the Arduino - [Link]

spikyWheel1

When robots take over the earth, it will be important that they maneuver across various types of terrain quickly and effectively. Bipedal motion is a tricky feat to accomplish for machines, so [Carter Hurd] decided, why not invent a better wheel? Even wheels can be improved, right?

Making excellent use of the prototyping capabilities of a 3D printer, [Carter] designed a set of bulb-shaped mechanisms which act effectively to drive themselves around on a smooth surface. The bulb is split radially into a series of wedge slices which can articulate outward, transforming the robot into something of a spiky razor-beast, able to tear through piles of fall leaves or wakes of loose sand. In order to unfurl itself however, the shaft driving the central mounting plate of the wedges has to fight the robot’s own weight. To solves this, [Carter] modified his design so that the rest of the wedges would unfold around the one supporting the load, the wheels would then rotate to shift the weight, allowing the last piece to extend.

[Carter] shows a proof of concept from earlier this year, explaining his hinge design which stretches a tendon-like connector in order to tension the wedges in one state or the other. Since then it looks like his transforming wheel has evolved a bit. You can get a better view of his robot in action here :


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, robots hacks
nov
04

E-traces creates visual sensations from ballerinas

Accelerometer, arduino, dance, inspiration, Lilypad, pressure sensor Commenti disabilitati su E-traces creates visual sensations from ballerinas

etrace

Electronic Traces is an interactive project designed to allow ballet dancers to recreate their movements in  digital pictures using a customizable mobile application. It was prototyped by product-designer Lesia Trubat mixing technological, artisanal skills and using Arduino Lilypad, force sensitive resistors and accelerometer:

The concept of Electronic Traces is based on capturing dance movements and transforming them into visual sensations through the use of new technologies. To do this we focused on the ballet shoes themselves, which through the contact with the ground, and thanks to Lilypad Arduino technology, record the pressure and movement of the dancer’s feet and send a signal to an electronic device. A special application will then allow us to show this data graphically and even customize it to suit each user, through the different functions of this app.

The user can then view all the moves made in video format, extract images and even print them. Dancers can interpret their own movements and correct them or compare them with the movements of other dancers, as graphs created with motion may be the same or different depending on the type of movements execute.

e-traces-lesia-trubat-08_800

 

Img_9095bHow to make an basic electronic color sensor and how to use it to make a color activated lock box

Read more on MAKE

boy We’re well past the time when Halloween costume submissions stop hitting the tip line, but like ever year we’re expecting a few to trickle in until at least Thanksgiving. Remember, kids: documentation is the worst part of any project.

[Troy] sent us a link to his wearable Game Boy costume. It’s exactly what you think it is: an old-school brick Game Boy that [Troy] wore around to a few parties last weekend. This one has a twist, though. There’s a laptop in there, making this Game Boy playable.

The build started off as a large cardboard box [Troy] covered with a scaled-up image of everyone’s favorite use of AA batteries. The D-pad and buttons were printed out at a local hackerspace, secured to a piece of plywood, and connected to an Arduino Due. The screen, in all its green and black glory, was taken from an old netbook. It was a widescreen display, but with a bezel around the display the only way to tell it’s not original is from the backlight.

Loaded up with Pokemon Blue, the large-scale Game Boy works like it should, enthralling guests at wherever [Troy] ended up last Friday. It also looks like a rather quick build, and something we could easily put together when we remember it next October 30th.

[Troy] wasn’t the only person with this idea. A few hours before he sent in a link to his wearable Game Boy costume, [Shawn] sent in his completely unrelated but extremely similar project. It’s a wearable brick Game Boy, a bit bigger, playing Tetris instead of Pokemon.

[Shawn]‘s build uses a cardboard box overlaid with a printout of a scaled-up Game Boy. Again, a laptop serves as the emulator and screen, input is handled by a ‘duino clone, and the buttons are slightly similar, but made out of cardboard.

Both are brilliant builds, adding a huge Game Boy to next year’s list of possible Halloween costume ideas. Videos of both below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Holiday Hacks, nintendo gameboy hacks


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