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ArduinoZero

It’s a pleasure to announce the latest development board, Arduino Zero, expanding the Arduino family by providing increased creative opportunities to the maker community.

Arduino and Atmel unveil the Arduino Zero, a simple and powerful 32-bit extension of the platform established by Arduino UNO. It aims to provide creative individuals with the potential to realize truly innovative ideas especially for smart IoT devices, wearable technology, high-tech automation, crazy robotics, and projects not yet imagined.

The board is powered by Atmel’s SAMD21 MCU, which features a 32-bit ARM Cortex® M0+ core and one of its most important feature is Atmel’s Embedded Debugger (EDBG), which provides a full debug interface without the need for additional hardware, significantly increasing the ease-of-use for software debugging. EDBG also supports a virtual COM port that can be used for device programming and traditional Arduino boot loader functionality.

Massimo Banzi, Arduino co-founder and CEO said:

“The flexible feature set enables endless project opportunities for devices and acts as a great educational tool for learning about 32-bit application development.”

Reza Kazerounian, senior vice president and general manager, microcontroller business unit at Atmel added:

“Leveraging more than 15 years of experience since the inception of AVR, simplicity and ease-of-use have been at the core of Atmel’s technology, Atmel is pleased to see the continued growth of the global maker community stemming from the increasing access and availability to open source platforms such as Arduino. We enable makers, but the power lies within the makers themselves.”

The first prototypes of Arduino Zero will be on display at Maker Faire Bay Area 2014 in San Mateo on May 17 and 18 at the following booths:
Arduino Booth: #204
Atmel Booth: #205
ARM Booth: #405

See you there!

Arduino Zero-top

 

SRF_Shield

The Ciseco SRF shield instantly transforms any Arduino style board into a fully wireless device. There are no jumpers to worry about, no configuration to be done, simply plug in and begin coding. The shield utilises the world’s best value, secure wireless module, the SRF.

You can securely exchange data with all other Ciseco radio devices, including the ultra-long range ARF. Designed for ease of use, the shield uses normal ASCII when transferring data, requiring no library or complex software. This means all your memory space is for code, not to drive the radio. All settings can be accessed or changed via standard text based AT commands.

The shield has extra pads to allow for configurations such as; Over the Air Programming of your micro, low power sleep states and adding an external antenna to extend the range.

The SRF has flexible frequency and power settings, to cater for all global radio regulations; these are easily set in software.

Also available:

Ciseco SRF shield transforms any Arduino into a fully wireless device - [Link]

Turbo-gusli

Self-playing pianos are so last year. How about a robotic acoustic-gusli?

[Dmitry Morozov] calls it the Turbo-Gusli or Gusli-Samogudy. A Gusli is perhaps the oldest Russian multi-stringed instrument, which resembles a harp and whose exact history is not quite known. Add Samogudy to the name and you’ve got a “self-playing Gusli”.

The eerie sounding music is produced by six individual servo motors, a regular DC motor, a stepper motor, three solenoids, a handful of springs, and 38 strings. It’s all controlled by two Arduino Unos, with the software written in Pure Data, an open source visual programming language.

He’s made several videos of the exhibit, including a performance that sends shivers down our spines — stick around after the break for a listen!

As an artist-maker, [Dmitry] has made quite a few hack worthy instruments, like his dry ice Cryophone, or our favorite — the credit card swiping exhibit entitled Financial Risks.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, musical hacks

Turbo-gusli

Self-playing pianos are so last year. How about a robotic acoustic-gusli?

[Dmitry Morozov] calls it the Turbo-Gusli or Gusli-Samogudy. A Gusli is perhaps the oldest Russian multi-stringed instrument, which resembles a harp and whose exact history is not quite known. Add Samogudy to the name and you’ve got a “self-playing Gusli”.

The eerie sounding music is produced by six individual servo motors, a regular DC motor, a stepper motor, three solenoids, a handful of springs, and 38 strings. It’s all controlled by two Arduino Unos, with the software written in Pure Data, an open source visual programming language.

He’s made several videos of the exhibit, including a performance that sends shivers down our spines — stick around after the break for a listen!

As an artist-maker, [Dmitry] has made quite a few hack worthy instruments, like his dry ice Cryophone, or our favorite — the credit card swiping exhibit entitled Financial Risks.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, musical hacks

tooth

[Zenios] and [Raivis] are building a small balancing robot, and for communications to the outside world, they’re using a small, extremely cheap Bluetooth adapter. They figured uploading code to the microcontroller over Bluetooth would be a good idea, but their adapter, a cheap HC-06 module, had no way of resetting the microcontroller; it just provided Tx and Rx the serial port. They did notice a LED blinked when a device wasn’t connected to the adapter, so with a simple circuit they kludged a reset circuit where it wasn’t intended.

The small LED on the HC-06 module blinks when nothing is connected, and remains on when a connection is established. Figuring a new connection would be a good time to upload new code, the guys needed to design a circuit that would stay low when the LED was blinking, and switch to high when the LED was on.

A simple RC filter took care of the blinking LED, keeping the line low until a device connected. Bringing the logic level high when the LED stayed solid required digging through a part drawer, eventually finding an LM741 p differential amplifier.

After a few small changes to the bootloader, the guys had a reliable means of flashing new firmware without the need of programming adapters or wires draped over their workspace, all with a Bluetooth adapter that shouldn’t have this capability. Video below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

makerfaire rome 2014

Come and join the biggest European gathering of Makers, full of amazing people who enjoy learning and love sharing projects and inventions from the 3rd to the 5th of October in Rome.

If you have an awesome project and want to show off to an international community, remember that the Call for Makers will be open until the 25th of May. Click here to submit your project.

There are a number of different types of maker applications you can do. You can apply as:

Maker : Individuals, groups, schools and organizations that would like to demonstrate what they make and/or how it works; interactive exhibits are encouraged. No fee to exhibit for Makers in a standard setup.

Light-Talk speaker: Individuals and groups who would like to talk about an idea or project of interest to the Maker community, OR makers who are interested in demonstrating what they make and how it works in a stage setting. Presentations are typically 15 or 40 minutes, with some time for Q&A.

Hands-On Workshop: If your passion is in inspiring the public into Making, we invite you to propose activities and workshops. The organization can provide materials and components for activities (please be specific in your proposal). Activities has to be guided and Maker facilitated. Each Activity should have a duration of 2 hours and half or the whole day and should be accessible for younger audience to make with parental guidance.

This year the venue will be the Parco della Musica Auditorium, the multi-functional complex designed by Renzo Piano (Viale Pietro Coubertin 30), in the Flaminio area of the city.

ohs2014

And just some days before on  September 30 and October 1 , the same venue will host the fifth edition of the  Open Hardware Summit, the annual conference organized by the Open Source Hardware Association and the world’s first comprehensive conference on open hardware.

Keynotes cover a wide range of subjects from electronics and mechanics to related fields such as digital fabrication, fashion technology, self-quantification devices, and DIY bio. Confirmed speakers until now are Becky Stern from Adafruit, Gabriella Levine COO of Protei Inc, manufacturing robotic biomimetic sailboats, Phoenix Perry - Adjunct Professor at NYU teaching Gaming, Design and more to come. They are seeking submissions for talks and workshops from individuals and groups working with open hardware and related areas. Submit your proposal (Accepted contributors will have airfare PAID by the organization)!

 

HC-SR04-ultrasonic-range-finder

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

Ultrasonic range finder using 8051 microcontroller has been already published by me in this website. This time it is an ultrasonic range finder using arduino. HC-SR04 ultrasonic range finder module is used as the sensor here. The display consists of a three digit multiplexed seven segment display. This range finder can measure up to 200 cm and has an accuracy of 1cm. There is an option for displaying the distance in inch also. Typical applications of this range finder are parking sensors, obstacle warning system, level controllers, terrain monitoring devices etc. Lets have a look at the HC-SR04 ultrasonic module first.

Ultrasonic range finder using arduino - [Link]

Printoo’s flexible modules provide the ideal form factor to quickly create first product concepts for smart wearables devices. BITalino (http://www.bitalino.com/) is revolutionizing DIY health tracking by making physiological sensors to measure the body’s biosignals accessible to all. Combine the two and it has never been easier to create revolutionary smart wearable concepts to life.

With Printoo, a number of inputs were already available: accelerometer, temperature sensor, capacitive and light sensors. BITalino’s modules for Electromyography (EMG), Electrodermal Activity (EDA) and Electrocardiogram (ECG) can be easily connected to Printoo through a flexible coupling board. Combine these inputs with flexible LEDs (in strip or matrix form), electrochromic displays, a sound buzzer, as well as Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity, and the possibilities are endless.

BITalino – Create projects with physiological sensors - [Link]

 

RFID Garage Door Opener

[Jason] really wanted to build an RFID controlled garage door opener and decided to turn to Arduino to get the job done. For someone who’s never worked with an Arduino before, he really seemed to know what he was doing.

The Arduino acts as the brains of the operation while an off-the-shelf NFC/RFID reader module is used to read the RFID tags. To add new keys to the system, [Jason] simply swipes his “master” RFID key. An indicator LED lights up and a piezo speaker beeps, letting you know that the system is ready to read a new key. Once the new key is read, the address is stored on an EEPROM. From that point forward the new key is permitted to activate the system.

Whenever a valid key is swiped, the Arduino triggers a relay which can then be used to control just about anything. In this case, [Jason] plans to use it to control his garage door. The system also has a few manual controls. First is the reset button. If this button is held down for two seconds, all of the keys from the EEPROM are erased. This button would obviously only be available to people who are already inside the garage. There is also a DIP switch that allows the user to select how long the relay circuit should remain open. This is configurable in increments of 100ms.

For now the circuit is wired up on a couple of breadboards, but it might be a good idea to use something more permanent. [Jason] could always take it a step further and learn to etch his own PCB’s. Or he could even design a board in Eagle CAD and order a real printed board. Don’t miss the video description of the RFID system below.

[via Reddit]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

ArduinoTRE-DE

We are excited to announce that starting today a limited batch of 50 Arduino TRE Developer Edition boards is  available in the Arduino Store.

The Arduino TRE Developer Edition (see other pics) is a pre-production board. Its release kicks off our redesigned Beta Testing Program: anyone in the community who purchases the board will be able to give us feedback and suggestions in a new, direct way.

After buying the board you’ll receive an invitation to join the beta-testing program, as a beta-tester you will be able to contribute to the development of the board by signing up for tasks and projects. You’ll be working alongside the Arduino and BeagleBoard.org teams on tasks such as writing examples, testing libraries and external hardware, and making projects. Completed tasks will be rewarded with a special program of benefits, including the possibility of featuring your project on the Arduino blog and receiving a coupon for the same value of the TRE Developer Edition you purchased. We will be beta-testing the board for about three months.

As many of you already know, the Arduino TRE is not a typical Arduino board. It’s a Linux computer running on a Sitara processor, plus a full Arduino Leonardo. It builds upon the experience of both Arduino and BeagleBoard.org, combining the strengths of both.

When using Arduino TRE  you’ll see a new editor (IDE) that has been specifically developed for this board. The TRE IDE comes pre-installed with the onboard Linux and is accessible via a web browser. It builds upon the simplicity of the Arduino software experience, while adding a few new powerful features (such as uploading sketches from the onboard Linux) and a refreshed UI.

TREapp_Light

[click to enlarge]

Please keep in mind that the final release could differ to any degree from this one. By being part of the beta program you will be notified in realtime of any change in the hardware or software so that your product or application will be fully compatible with the release version.

The Arduino TRE final board will be available later this year, pending results of Beta Testing Program.

TREapp_Dark

[click to enlarge]

Arduino TRE Developer edition will be also at Maker Faire Bay Area next weekend! Come and visit us at the Arduino booth (#204).



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